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Dr. Clay Moltz, Friday, 4-11-14 April 12, 2014

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Dr. Clay Moltz, Friday, 4-11-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2226-BWB-2014-04-11.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Clay Moltz.  Topics: We discussed our guest’s new book, “Crowded Orbits: Conflict and Cooperation in Space,” plus numerous related topics.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back Dr. Clay Moltz to the show to discuss his new book “Crowded Orbits: Conflict and Cooperation in Space.”  Please remember to buy this book through the OGLF/The Space Show Amazon portal so Amazon will contribute to The Space Show.  Our Amazon instructions are in every archive summary and on each Space Show blog entry.  During the first segment of our 90 minute discussion, Dr. Moltz told us why he wrote the book which was to address orbital crowding, possible conflict in space and to bring these issues and others to the attention of the general public as space impacts everyone everyday.  A major topic for our discussion was space debris.  Using this field as an example, Dr. Moltz  made a very strong case for rules of the road, space traffic control issues, and responsible behavior by both governments and the private sector.  We talked about entrepreneurs and private groups resisting a more regulated environment and he made the case for the need for cooperation to avoid conflicts.  Early in his book, he outlined three significant points of view regarding the debate over space policy, ranging from conflict & the military use of space was inevitable so prepare for it to avoiding problems by piecemeal global engagement to increasing the use of international space projects through international governance.  Dr. Moltz received many email questions challenging a regulated environment and the need for more controls on space businesses and operations.  We talked about the cubesat technology and growth of the industry, the lack of registration, & as the industry grows, possible crowding problems.  We also discussed the U.N. treaties that seem to cover what we were talking about so why the need for more agreements & regulations?

In our second segment, we continued our human spaceflight discussion from the end of the first segment, plus we looked at space in other countries.  We mostly focused on China, India, Iran, and North Korea among others.  We talked about large scale industries that may develop over time such as SSP.  GPS was an example, then a listener asked about cyberwarfare & the impact on space policy.  Toward the end of the program, I asked about space interest among students at the Naval Postgraduate School. Students are very interested space and the subjects discussed in Clay’s book and on today’s show.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach Dr. Moltz through me.

Alan Steinberg, Friday, 2-1-13 February 2, 2013

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Alan Steinberg, Friday, 2-1-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1941-BWB-2013-02-01.mp3

Guest:  Alan Steinberg.  Topics;  Protecting our space assets, weapons in space, space policy and public opinion.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.  We welcomed Alan Steinberg to the program to discuss both is latest Astropolitics article, “Weapons in Space: The Need to Protect Space Assets,” and his 2011 Space Policy article, , “Space policy responsiveness: The relationship between public opinion and NASA funding.”  Both of these articles are available for purchase by using Google the full title of the article.  During the first half of the program, we focused on Alan’s Astropolitics article.  As you will hear, the issue of protecting our space assets is not an easy one to address or solve.  Furthermore, as Alan and listeners suggested, the response the U.S. might make to an attack on space assets is unclear, especially if the attacking party or nation had an excuse, said it was an accident, or denied intentionally doing the deed.  Alan and listener Michael defined the term space weapon and Michael provided us with the PPWT proposed treaty language defining space weapons.  Alan had much to say about protecting space assets and weapons in space in the context of the U.N. treaties.  We talked about U.S. as well as international enforcement here and in other countries.  Space debris was discussed, especially in light of the difficulty in diplomatic action leading to tangible action against a debris causing country or party.  Also discussed was government being responsible for commercial space assets under its flag.

     In the second segment, we mostly talked about Alan’s 2011 Space Policy article, “Space policy responsiveness: The relationship between public opinion and NASA funding,” although many listeners via email and the phone kept returning to the space weapons topic.  Alan took lots of questions about the role and impact on policy of space advocacy and as you will hear, its not easy or clear to pin down.  Alan had much to say on how best to influence members of congress but was clear in pointing out that space advocacy does not have the numbers of the larger and more powerful lobbying groups that are far more effective in influencing policy than is the space community.  Another of his points focused in on the significant influence of the aerospace industry as compared to space advocates and enthusiasts.  We also learned from his concluding paragraph that when researching this issue, “research on what influences space policy attitudes and even space policy public opinion is in short supply.” In addition, we learned that while Americans like our space program and NASA, they don’t have a good understanding of it, the actual amount of funding NASA gets in relationship to the budget, and that their liking of the space program simply does not translate to more funding and more programs.

     Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  If you want to contact Alan Steinberg, you can do so through drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Tom Olson, Monday, 12-31-12 January 1, 2013

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Tom Olson, Monday, 12-31-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1921-BWB-2012-12-31.mp3

2012 Year End Review & Analysis for Space Development

Guest:  Tom Olson.   Topics: The year 2012 is reviewed from the space perspective and we look forward to space development in 2013.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.  We welcomed back Tom Olson for his annual Space Show year in review analysis with a look forward to 2013 for space development.  We started our discussion by remembering those in our space community that are no longer with us. We specifically mentioned three dear friends though we know that others have also left us.  Our program was dedicated to Neil Armstrong, Jesco von Puttkamer, and Reda Anderson.  We certainly miss our friends but space development marches on like everything else in life.  A few of the early issues Tom brought up in the 2012 annual overview of space included the Falcon 9 launches and Dragon missions.  He also talked about ISDC and birthing of Dragon during the keynote by NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden.  While on the subject of SpaceX and its mission to the ISS, Paul sent in a question asking if SpaceX dropping out of the Stratolauncher project indicated that perhaps they had “bitten off more than they could chew.”  Tom and I have no inside information about SpaceX and Stratolaunch but we both thought that Paul’s comment was reasonable as SpaceX is certainly busy enough with game changing projects & technology.  Cubesats were discussed given their rise in popularity and importance in 2012. It seems as if their potential is more than on the rise!  Cubesat growth also cuts across many diverse space industry segments and niche markets.  Bev asked about the future of 3-D printing and its potential impact on future human spaceflight (HSF). 3-D printing is certainly experiencing space industry growth & there will soon be a small 3-D printer on the ISS.  Heavy lift came up and much was said about the Falcon Heavy and SLS, both looking back over 2012 & forward to 2013.

In our second segment, I asked if fuel depots would evolve from the Power Point & rhetoric stage to something more tangible in 2013.  We talked about depots as many of the projects announced in 2012 use depot technology to enable their plan.  Tom talked about warp drive becoming more possible due to the 2012 work of Dr. Sonny White.  Dr. White will be a guest on The Space Show Friday, January 4, 2013.  Tom next brought up NASA budget issues & possible cuts.  He talked about science mission cuts, the JWST, and on the HSF side, SLS eating up much of the budget with commercial crew still needing funding.  I asked Tom how he thought space advocacy made out during 2012.  Mixed was a one word summary of this discussion.  Next, we talked about space settlement being made part of the U.S. space policy in 2013.  Tom went over the pros & cons surrounding this effort. Doug called in about space settlement & I referred him to earlier programs with Steve Wolfe who authored the Space Settlement Act of 1988 which is part of public law.  Tom said space settlement was SLS dependent & that makes the potential policy controversial to many space enthusiasts since many oppose SLS.  Tom said 2012 was a good year for new commercial space grandiose missions such as Golden Spike, Planetary Resources, Mars One, a lunar base, Shackleton Energy, even EML2 missions.  He kept asking the questions regarding objectives, who pays, the reasons for the missions, and more. He said most of these missions rely on some form of large launcher, either the Falcon Heavy SLS.  Tom talked about ITAR reform that has been signed by both houses of Congress & is applicable to the U.S. satellite industry.  Human rating of the Atlas came up for a 2012 progress report, then Dave in San Antonio inquired about cyber warfare & the space industry in 2012 & the future.  2012 marked the year the space shuttles went on display in museums & Tom talked about the Russian space program investments for modernization over the coming decade. He also talked about other national space programs.  Near the end of our program, we brought up the Spaceport America liability issue & the risks facing the New Mexico spaceport.  Tom updated us for 2013 on the NewSpace Business Plan Competition & his work with the Exodus Group for space business consulting.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email Tom through drspace@thespaceshow.com.

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