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AIAA California Space Day, Monday, 2-25-13 February 25, 2013

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AIAA California Space Day, Monday, 2-25-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1958-BWB-2013-02-25.mp3

Guests:  Duane Hyland, John Rose.  Topics:  AIAA California Space Day and the California aerospace industry.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We welcomed back to the show Duane Hyland of AIAA and John Rose of Boeing to discuss the AIAA California Space Day scheduled for March 12-13, 2013 at the Capitol in Sacramento, CA.  Our guests went over the agenda which includes models of Curiosity on the Capitol lawn and more, plus meetings with members of the California Assembly and Senate.  If you want more information or are planning to attend, email Duane at duaneh@aiaa.org.  The schedule is for panel discussions and other meetings on Tuesday, a Tuesday evening reception with members of the California legislature and their staffs, and then the following morning, Wednesday, March 13, we will visit legislative offices to talk California space and the AIAA focus.  During our one hour program, Duane and John talked about the AIAA space agenda, both for their national lobby efforts with Congress as well as the state space day meetings.  Listeners wanted to know if AIAA was only traditional aerospace or if it included NewSpace and the emerging space companies.  Our guests had much to say about this as did I.  We also talked about the importance of the California aerospace industry to the entire aerospace industry in the U.S. and even globally.  We talked about disturbing trends in our national aerospace industry as well as in the California aerospace industry and the importance of events such as Space Day.  We talked about sequestration and its potential impact on space, both for DOD and NASA.  Our guests were asked about AIAA educational outreach to schools and different grades and near the end of our discussion, I asked if there was a process to undertake an outcome evaluation for the effectiveness of California Space Day and similar programs across the country.

If you have questions or comments, you can post them on The Space Show blog but if they pertain specifically to Space Day this year from March 12-13, please email Duane Hyland using duaneh@aiaa.org.

Dr. Michael Simpson & Langdon Morris, Sunday, 12-9-12 December 10, 2012

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Dr. Michael Simpson & Langdon Morris, Sunday, 12-9-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1910-BWB-2012-12-09.mp3

Guests:  Dr. Michael Simpson, Langdon Morris.  Topics:  International space cooperation & the new ATWG book, “International Cooperation For The Development of Space.” Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. We welcomed Dr. Michael Simpson and Langdon Morris to the program to discuss the new & important book, “International Cooperation For The Development of Space.” The book is available on Amazon.com at www.amazon.com/International-Cooperation-Development-Space-1/dp/1478186232/ref=onegiantlea20 and via Kindle @ www.amazon.com/International-Cooperation-Development-Technology-ebook/dp/B00941YBAG/ref=onegiantlea20. If you purchase this book through Amazon, a donation will be made to The Space Show/OGLF.  As you will hear me say throughout our program, this book helps make a very strong case, especially to those outside the space community, for why space development is so important.  I strongly urge you to read this book and to share it with as many as possible.  As we started our discussion, Langdon Morris provided us with an overview of the book, including the purpose behind it, and the global mix of authors and viewpoints supporting international cooperative space development.  We talked with Dr. Simpson about his Chapter 2:  “Broadening The Base: Cooperation As A Springboard For New Participants In the Space Sector.”  We learned about new countries being involved in space development, their requirements for getting involved in space which include economic growth, and the niche specialty areas being pursued by these new players.  I asked about the absence of human spaceflight in the international cooperation discussion.  This prompted a most interesting exchange with our guests on the subject, one you do not want to miss.  Our guests provided us with great examples of real benefits flowing from international cooperative space development, including emergency services for disasters such as Katrina.  We took listener calls suggesting international financial participation in cooperative space projects might make high ticket items more plausible such as SLS or a Mars mission.  There was general agreement on this theory but as our guest pointed out, there still needs to be international agreement on the project and its management.  Another benefit of international cooperation points to project stability over time.
      In our second segment, Doug called in to ask about a two track system consisting of a public sector track and a second track for public/private partnerships.  Our guests suggested the public/private direction would be more viable. Don’t miss their explanation for this approach.  We talked about competition as compared to international cooperation. Our guests were also asked about the impact of ITAR on U.S. international cooperation.  We talked about the Chinese space program and our guests were asked about the NewSpace segment.
      Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email our guests through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Tim Pickens, Thursday, 8-2-12 August 2, 2012

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Tim Pickens, Thursday, 8-2-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1827-BWB-2012-08-02.mp3

Guest:  Tim Pickens.  Topics:  Pickens Innovations, commercial space, space economics & policy.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed Tim Pickens back to the program to tell us about his new company Pickens Innovations.  As Tim explained, he has left Dynetics and formed his own consulting business.  Learn more about his new consultancy and activities by visiting www.timpickens.com.  We started our discussion by my asking Tim about some of the comments I made yesterday in a USA Today telephone interview regarding commercial/private space development.  Since I forgot to record the interview (something I have learned to do for my own protection given edit rights are seldom permitted re the articles or programs), I bounced some of my comments off Tim to see if I was drinking my own Kool Aid about the state of the private space industry, its potential, the positive changes I see happening, and more.  Tim confirmed that I was on the right track so now I await the USA Today article.  In the process of this discussion, Tim had much to say about the emerging commercial space industry, the companies involved, the economics and the markets.  We talked about how things have changed for the better over time and in recent years.  I then asked Tim about Rocket City Space Pioneers, his Google Lunar X Prize entry, for which he remains the team leader.  Tim was quite frank in discussing the program with us, the Google Lunar X Prize in general & many of the critical issues facing the contest & all the contestants.  Do listen carefully to what he said as it goes right to the heart of issues facing the broader commercial & private space development efforts/industry.  Part of our discussion focused on the value chain available for sustainable lunar business, the problems with ride sharing at this time to the Moon and much more. We also talked about essential time lines for the contest.  He said many times that affordable systems were needed, viable and sustainable business models were needed, and he was thinking about a merger or joint venture with other contestants to make it happen.  Tim fielded many questions about his new consultancy, Pickens Innovations. We learned that he was getting involved in other areas than space, specifically medical devices.  He described two such devices and why his company was pursuing their development.  How about market size and potential as compared to space?  In fact, cash flow & revenue from these successful non-space businesses are expected to fund many of his space development activities.  Also in this segment, our guest talked about space hardware issues.

In the second segment, he defined the Man Cave which he talks about on his website.  Tim responded to a listener question about the potential of a Netscape Moment re investing in space businesses, plus he talked about the need to have more fun and be less nerdy, referencing conference presentations and similar things space people engage in from time to time.  As an example, he cited the Big Bang Theory TV show and a new show about to start, Top Engineer.  Later, we talked about SLS and its future, its mission, and its likelihood of being funded to completion.  Suborbital space and vehicle issues were a discussion topic followed by Tim talking about the Space & Missile Defense Conference in Huntsville (www.udreg.com/SMD) later this month. His closing comments were positive & upbeat for our future, especially by using disruptive technologies which he talked about at great length throughout the interview.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.

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