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Brian Altmeyer, Friday, 10-24-14 October 25, 2014

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Brian Altmeyer, Friday, 10-24-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2343-BWB-2014-10-24.mp3

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Guest:  Brian Altmeyer.  Topics:  We discussed the guest’s article posted on the Oct. 6, 2014 issues of The Space Review:  “The Strange Contagion Of a Dream.”  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Brian Altmeyer to the program to discuss his Oct. 6, 2014 Space Review article, “The Strange Contagion of a Dream: How Space Visionaries Hijack Governments to Change the World (see http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2611/1). During the first segment of our 1 hour 27 minute discussion, Mr. Altmeyer introduced us to the background behind writing this article, how he got the idea for it, plus he explained the overall impact space visionaries have had on him and his interest in space development.  Our guest took us back in time to the V2 program, Von Braun, and the politics of beating the Soviet Union to the Moon.  He made the case that both the Soviet Union’s and the US space program fed off each other in the form of competition to not only develop military space resources and ICBMs, plus our civil space programs as well.  I then asked our guest if he thought competition with China over their lunar and long range plans would result in a similar push for civil and commercial space.  His response was very interesting.  Ellen in Portland sent an email suggesting we did not have inspirational or effective leaders today like we had with Von Braun and others.  Brian disputed that and made reference to Elon Musk at SpaceX several times during our discussion.  Gerald Driggers called to talk about the impact of the International Geophysical Year on our early program.  Gerald worked in the early space program & had much to say about the main space personalities of the time along with the early rockets.  Our guest was asked about vision and Mars One, again he brought up SpaceX, and then he talked about exoplanets.  I asked him about the second to last paragraph in his paper regarding leadership issues and many waiting or expecting a new leader to come on the scene in a future election.  Don’t miss his comments on this issue.

In the second segment, Brian was asked about space budgets serving as a limiting factor & if SpaceX was carrying too much of the burden for our moving forward with space development.  Listeners asked him about sustainable space projects inspired & pushed by advocacy.  Do the projects continue or eventually die off?  Allison sent in a note asking our guest why we even needed HSF.  For his response, he cited reasons often provided by Elon Musk when he gets this question or one like it.  Near the end of the program, Ron emailed our guest to challenge his visionary outlook by asking if he had considered the reality of applying  human medical factors, engineering realities, orbital mechanics, & the known science for rockets & human spaceflight regarding the type of visionary statements made by Brian during the show.  This proved to be an interesting discussion as Brian said there were two ways to resolve such issues.  One way would be through testing and incremental progress to resolve or mitigate problems and the other way would be to just do the flight and sort of learn on the job, realizing there would be lots of casualties but at least we would be flying and learning.  I asked our guest if he was dismissing the known engineering &science including medical science.  He said he was not but clearly he preferred the second approach to problem solving. What do you think?

Please let us know by posting your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach our guest through me or the email address he provided at the end of his Space Review article.

Bruce Pittman, Monday, 10-13-14 October 14, 2014

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Bruce Pittman, Monday, 10-13-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2335-BWB-2014-10-13.mp3

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Guest:  Bruce Pittman.  Topics:  The emerging commercial space industry and related topics.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Bruce Pittman back to the show to discuss the emerging commercial space industry. During the first segment of our 90 minute program Bruce said this was the most exciting time every for commercial space, certain in his 30 plus year career.  He talked about there being a paradigm shift underway, NASA challenges and the progress made in just five short years.  He cited examples with COTS, commercial payloads to the ISS, SpaceX, and lots of smaller companies working with small satellites.  Other examples included the 3D printer on the ISS, the growth of spaceports, the industry spreading out into multiple states, and investment capital coming to the industry.  I asked about human spaceflight (HSF) and he said it was more challenging and demanding but was optimistic that launch costs would come down, especially if reusability enters the market.  Reusability would greatly assist in bringing more commercial options to the table even for HSF.  Jerome in the UK emailed to ask about a commercial space industry outside the U.S.  Both Bruce and I commented on Jerome’s question.  Harry emailed Bruce to inquire if going public was essential for pushing the emerging commercial space industry forward.  Bruce was also asked what excited him the most in the industry.  Listen to his choices. I asked our guest if he saw SLS as an asset to the emerging commercial space industry, being neutral, or being a detriment.  He believes there will be synergistic enhancements for both SLS and the commercial space industry through the development of SLS.  Don’t miss his full comments. Bruce was asked about commercial space ventures being able to finally close a business case and having more than just government as the customer.  Allison emailed us asking Bruce to define paradigm shift.  This also proved an interesting discussion.  Near the end of the segment, our guest was asked bout NEOs and commercial opportunities.  We also talked about two NASA papers in this segment.  The first, “Pioneering Space: NASA’s Next Steps on the Path to Mars” from May 29, 2014 can be downloaded at http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/Pioneering-space-final-052914b.pdf.  The second paper, “Emerging Space:  The Evolving Landscape of 21st Century American Spaceflight,” can be downloaded at http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/Emerging_Space_Report.pdf.  Just before the break, Paul asked about fuel depots for the commercial space industry.

In our second segment, we started talking about space settlement, pioneering, and space exploration.  Bruce explained the differences with pioneering making it possible to have a permanent presence in space by getting in place needed infrastructure and the basics for living in space.  Space settlement would be established after pioneering.  Exploring goes forth to find out what is out there and to return to tell about it.  A listener asked if going to the Moon was a pioneering step on the way to Martian settlement.  Later, Bruce said that pioneering will be driven by economics. In this segment, we also talked about property rights and benefit sharing plus the impact these two issues might have on the emerging commercial space industry.  Risk averseness came up as well.  As we were drawing to a close, Bruce mentioned how all of the industry was in a transitional period, including traditional aerospace.  He suggested things to look for over the coming months included more commercial activities on the ISS, the upcoming Bigelow module for the ISS, & the Google Lunar XPrize.  In closing, we talked about Silicon Valley and the industry as well as the lowering of barriers to entry for emerging commercial space companies.  Bruce also mentioned the Next Giant Leap Conference in Hawaii, Nov. 9-13, 2014.  For more information, see http://2014giantleap.aerospacehawaii.info.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Bruce Pittman through me.

Rod Pyle, Friday, 9-26-14 September 27, 2014

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Rod Pyle, Friday, 9-26-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2325-BWB-2014-09-26.mp3

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Guest:  Rod Pyle.  Topic:  We discussed Rod’s latest book, “Curiosity: An Inside Look at the Mars Rover Mission and the People Who Made It Happen.” Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed author Rod Pyle back to the show to discuss his current book, “Curiosity: An Inside Look at the Mars Rover Mission and the People Who Made It Happen.”  Find out more about Rod and his books at his websites, http://www.rodpylebooks.net and http://www.rodpylemedia.com.  During the first segment of this 1 hour 27 minute program, Rod explained his long time interest in Mars and why he decided to write this excellent book.  I asked if NASA & JPL were cooperative with him in writing it and he said yes.  I asked him what impressed him the most about the Curiosity project and he said the Sky Crane to which he has devoted a full chapter in his book.  Rod then told us about the NASA Curiosity Mission Review Panel headed by Clive Neal at Notre Dame which suggested that mission management had enabled problems including getting a poor science return for the money and its lack of scientific focus and detail.  You can read about this review panel by visiting http://astronomyaggregator.com/exploration/nasa-panel-curiosity-planning-lacks-scientific-focus or simply Google Notre Dame Curiosity Mission Review Panel for additional panel commentary on Curiosity.  Listeners asked Rod about HSF to Mars and if after researching the mission, did he think the money spent on the project was worth it.  Rod provided some interesting budgetary comparisons and did say that he thought it was a good investment & program. He talked about the Curiosity mission goals, sedimentary rocks and Martian geology.  Future missions based on Curiosity were brought up, especially Mars 2020.  Another listener asked about using humans for Martian exploration instead of rovers.  He cited compelling financial facts between rovers and HSF which supported the use of Rovers, at least for now.  Another listener asked if he thought Curiosity was the best ever Mars mission.  His response might surprise you.  Prior to the break, he addressed a question about missions to the Martian moons.

In the second segment, Paula asked about ongoing mission operating costs and wanted to know if they were roughly equal for all the robotic missions.  Later, I asked if JPL had reviewed his manuscript. He said he sent it to them for fact checking but not content editing.  He also mentioned JPL reviewed it from an ITAR compliance perspective but did not “muzzle” anything.  A listener asked about the life expectancy of a rover team at JPL before moving on to another project or even leaving JPL.  Questions came in about SpaceX and its Mars plans, the both the SLS and F1 engine project came up for discussion.  Later, Rod said based on website hits, Pathfinder was probably the most popular of the Mars rover missions.  Another listener asked Rod to compare rovers from other nations to those built by JPL and NASA. As we were ending, he was asked about the Indian MOM mission and Maven.  His book “Curiosity” is packed with information such as we discussed plus much more in 32 chapters.  Remember, if you buy the book on Amazon, use the OGLF Amazon Portal so that Amazon will make a contribution to The Space Show. Instructions are on all website & blog archives plus both websites or just email me.

Please post questions/comments on The Space Show blog above.  You can reach Rod through his websites or me.

 

Dr. Mike Griffin, Tuesday, 9-16-14 September 17, 2014

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Dr. Mike Griffin, Tuesday, 9-16-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2317-BWB-2014-09-16.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Mike Griffin.  Topics: Human spaceflight policy, political choices, space technology, Mars, Moon, Asteroids and more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back to the program Dr. Mike Griffin.  During the first segment of our 90 minute discussion, Mike talked about human spaceflight (HSF) and the commercial space market.  He said exploration would be a government project or at least with government in the lead, especially if the commercial market was not there.  He threw water on the argument that our space policy was budget driven.  Instead, he talked about it being based on choices we make. It was not and is not about the money.  His comments throughout or discussion on this topic supported his argument.  He even said the cost of space for the U.S. taxpayer was around 15 cents/day.  This discussion evolved to one on the importance of leadership which we agreed was in short supply today.  Included in this discussion was Mike’s vision for our space policy & program, plus he explained its importance and value to our nation both today and for the future.  He spoke to the issue of what society wants and the choices it makes that shape our future.  Space should be part of our national policy debate and hopefully such a debate would enable quality choices to be made that keep us on the leadership edge with all nations.   Mike was asked who he thought would be next on the Moon and he said China.  We also talked about the private sector taking us back to the Moon with HSF.  He said that the private sector could do this, capital was not an issue, but for the private sector to do it there needs to be a closing of the business case which he did not see at this time.  SLS John called in & asked about space advocacy diversity which he said seemed to be at war with NASA & whatever the program of record might be.  Mike had much to say about this, especially about inefficiencies in government organizations and projects.  He also said if the private venture or industry cannot make money, then it should be a federal project. Many times during our discussion he said that there are things that a society should do just because they are hard & they don’t have to look good on the balance sheet.  John also asked about the RD-180 engine, Mike offered us his conclusion as to why we should be a new version of the RD-180 so that we do not continue being dependent on Russia for space related hardware, etc.  Later, he was asked about cislunar space development which he said should be a public enterprise.  He cited many examples and models supporting the public development of this important space infrastructure.  SLS was discussed.  Mike very clearly articulated the case for SLS today and again repeated that SLS future missions are about choices, not the budget.  Don’t miss his comments.  As the segment ended, Randy emailed a question asking for the rational & silver bullet for HSF.  In my opinion, Mike gave an excellent response to this question so don’t miss it.

In the second segment, Mike got some questions about NASA doing more R&D and even forming a NACA-like division or program.  We talked about NASA R&D, the need for a NACA-like program and more.  Dave, our caller, commented on leadership, then Bill in Denver emailed in a question about using fuel depots and smaller launch vehicles rather than heavy lift vehicles like SLS.  Again, Mike had much to say about heavy lift, including that while possible to do smaller vehicle launches., the numbers don’t pan out for efficiency.  You need to listen to this full discussion which also addressed some bogus assumptions regarding inefficient heavy lift decision making.  Nuclear propulsion and Vasimr came up, , then we again focused on vision that takes on big challenges because we can!  More was said on lunar colonies evolving to longer BLEO missions plus cislunar commerce, especially cislunar cargo missions.  Another listener asked about being dependent on the Russians for HSF to the ISS and if shuttle was retired too early.  Mike talked about having wanted to fly shuttle at a minimum rate annually until a new vehicle was operational.  We talked about the role of the congress and White House as compared to the role of the NASA Administrator.  Later, we talked about the role of public support and individuals petitioning congress on space policy.  Listen to his story about the Hubble repair mission.  I even asked if poorly written and fantasy driven letters to informed staffers helped or hurt the cause.  Listen for Mike’s response. In summary, Mike said his wish was that people would share is view that there are important things for society to do but that don’t look good on a balance sheet.  In the end, he said he was optimistic that his positive views on space would prevail and that when policy makers realized that China was going to put people on the Moon and what that would mean for the US, it would not be allowed to happen.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.

James (Jim) Faist, Tuesday, 9-2-14 September 3, 2014

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James (Jim) Faist, Tuesday, 9-2-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2308-BWB-2014-09-02.mp3

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Guest:  James (Jim) Faist.  Topics:  Military space, commercial space, NASA, launches, military use of cubesats & UAVs.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Jim Faist to the program for this 63 minute discussion.  We started our first and only segment by inquiring about military space and possible synergies with commercial space.  Mr. Faist cited communication satellites of all types including Direct TV, high bandwidth space communications platforms and infrastructure, plus the push to deep space.  Our guest talked about the new optical coms with much higher bandwidth.  I asked Jim about the time lags from R&D to military space operations to NASA and civil space, then to commercial space companies.  Jim estimated about 5-8 years to military space and about ten years to civil space.  An email listener asked about DoD launches being able to serve as drivers for NASA and commercial space to increase by increasing the launch rate to drive down launch costs.  We then talked about priorities for military space.  Here, we learned that DOD is very concerned with costs but the priority is the mission.   Costs are just one part of the mission priorities..  In general, DOD likes and wants competition and lower prices are important.  One of the points our guest made was that other space nations can spend more on R&D and new projects than we do as a percentage of their budgets since we have to maintain older technology & infrastructure while others that are newer to space don’t have the legacy issues to support & finance.  This brought up a question by Carl who wanted to know if satellite on orbit servicing was worth it or would it be better to go for the new hardware.  The DOD usage of cubesats came up and we compared cubesats to smallsats and finally to the use of UAVs.  You will find the comparisons interesting.  A listener asked about the SpaceX-Air Force lawsuit.  Here, Jim talked about the process for DOD requirements for confidence in launchers and at one point suggested it might be a ten year long process.  I also asked our guest about our building a new rocket motor to replace the RD-180.  Another question focused on the possible DOD use of SLS and heavy lift.  AF Space Command came up as did responsive space and a comparison of that to UAVs.  We talked about DOD public/private partnerships or joint partnerships with civil/commercial space.  Lunar outposts and cislunar space were mentioned as well as the concept of a Space Guard modeled after the Coast Guard. Near the end, I asked about suborbital space tourism/science missions.  Jim mentioned using sounding rockets to test & flight qualify space hardware.  He thought the suborbitals would be good for that.  TRLs came up again & we talked about the role of the Schafer Corp in military space plus their current need for people & their current hiring needs.  Cubesats came up again, especially concerning enough launches and what it might mean for cubesats if they carry propulsion with them as that makes it hard to fly as a secondary payload.  In response to launch issues, he said it was not enough to just focus on the cubesats, the launch side of the business must also be considered & addressed.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can contact Mr. Faist through me or the Schafer Corp website (www.schafercorp.com).

Jim Plaxco, Monday, 7-14-15 July 15, 2014

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Jim Plaxco, Monday, 7-14-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2279-BWB-2014-07-14.mp3

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Guest:  Jim Plaxco.  Topics:  The ASS ISS science platform, R&D, commercial space, SLS & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.    For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Jim Plaxco to the program. During the first segment of our 96 minute discussion, Jim initially talked about the recent American Astronautical Society (ASS) conference which had a focus on ISS research.  Jim provided us with a quality discussion about science in space and aboard the ISS.  We addressed many important issues including ISS crew limitations, the probable life expectancy of the ISS, the type of science done on station, & payload size limitations, including returning to Earth.  We talked about private sector experiments, especially those with NanoRacks.

In the same segment, we talked about suborbital science missions which seem to be just around the corner.  Jim sees much that is positive coming from these suborbital science missions.  Suborbital space tourism was also a topic in this segment.  So was the possibility of Bigelow space stations.  As the segment ended, we honed in on the need to lower the cost of space access.  In our second segment, we started off with SLS as our topic.  Jim said he was pro space and cautious at best regarding SLS.  We talked about markets for space projects and both of us suggested an absence of markets for SLS though Jim did reference the Data Purchase Act.  Bigelow Aerospace habs came up for more discussion.  Doug called in and discussed the idea of a separate NASA for science and HSF.  Jim had much to say about this concept.  Near the end of the program, I asked Jim where he thought HSF would be in five years.  We also talked about the suborbitals going orbital (if possible).  Jim suggested the industry faced three challenges including financing, the economy, and the regulatory risks.  Note that technical challenges were not among his top challenges.  Our final topic addressed international partnership for both public and private space ventures.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach Jim Plaxco through me.

Mike Gold, Tuesday, 7-1-14 July 2, 2014

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Mike Gold, Tuesday, 7-1-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2272-BWB-2014-07-01.mp3

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Guest:  Mike Gold.   Topics:  Office of Commercial Space Transportation (COMSTAC) Advisory Committee & Bigelow Aerospace updates.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back Mike Gold, particularly in his new position as the Chair of the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (COMSTAC) Advisory Committee, as well as for Bigelow Aerospace updates in the second half of our program.  During the first segment of our one hour discussion, Mr. Gold talked about the Office of Commercial Space Transportation, the COMSTAC which is the Advisory Committee of which he is the new Chair. He also explained the relationship of the COMSTAC with the FAA AST and let us know that their meetings are open to the public.  Announcements, archived videos and other important COMSTAC information can be found on their website at http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/ast/advisory_committee.  ITAR reform was also a big part of our discussion.

In the second segment, Mr. Gold provided us with Bigelow Aerospace updates.  We started with Tony’s email about the Landis Land orbit in the Venusian Atmosphere in which in which he inquired if Bigelow or anyone had any plans to put a habitat in that orbit.  Mile’s response seemed to leave some openings there for a future down the road.  We talked more about ITAR, a subject that was discussed in both segments.  Mr. Gold talked about the upcoming ISS Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), which is scheduled to arrive at the space station in 2015 for a two-year technology demonstration (www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/news/beam_feature.html).  Mike mentioned that an astronaut would actually board the module.  We talked about government regulations, going BLEO and space property rights.  In fact, Mike suggested that the absence space property rights or legal processes for investment by private space companies is at least a partial explanation for why we have done so little in space development over the past several decades.  In the context of space based property right, we discussed the Outer Space Treaty (OST), benefit sharing issues, and the Moon Treaty.  Mike talked about an important first step in property right which would be to make sure that companies who operate and engage in space development can do so in an exclusive non-interference zone.  Near the end of the discussion we talked about the frustration in waiting for progress to be made, the earlier Bigelow successes including Genesis 1 & 2 and the BA 330 full service/size habitat.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach Mike Gold through COMSTAC or me.

Greg Cecil, Friday, 6-27-14 June 28, 2014

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Greg Cecil, Friday, 6-27-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2269-BWB-2014-06-27.mp3

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Guest:  Greg Cecil.  Topics: STEM for Middle School students, human spaceflight, Mars & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Greg Cecil back to the program for this 1 hour 37 minute discussion.  During our first segment, Greg summarized his space shuttle experience when working on the thermal protection system at KSC, talked about keeping in touch with former shuttle employees and letting us know that in his opinion, shuttle was retired too early.  After the shuttle program was closed down, Greg began consulting and teaching science to middle school students.  He talked about the difference in a public inner city school as compared to teaching in a private school.  His observations are important, especially about parent involvement  & support in the student’s education.  Greg devised space related projects for the students & created scientific experiments to fly with the J.P. Aerospace high altitude balloon flights.  Greg described some of the experiments and the benefits in working with John Powell of J.P. Aerospace.  We talked about the impact of the flights and making the payloads.  I asked if the impact will remain with them as they go through school, possibly in selecting a space or science education and career.  Greg also attended the recent Explore Mars Humans2Mars Conference and here he offered us many valuable observations.  Listen to what he had to say about NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden’s talk, then later the talk given by NewSpace advocate and co-founder of the Space Frontier Foundation, Rick Tumlinson.  The differences between the two talks and approaches led to Greg’s conversion to being a NewSpace proponent.  Greg talked about SpaceX and suggested it was risky for any one company to be the face of NewSpace, either intentionally or by chance.

In the second segment, Greg talked about the movie, “I want To Be An Astronaut.”  Doug emailed in a comment based on our first segment discussion given Greg’s comment about NASA budgets being tight & being a show stopper for grandiose HSF missions such as those to Mars & as reported in the NRC Pathways HSF study.  Greg responded to Doug, then I let got with one of my infamous rants directed not just at Doug but we space enthusiasts in general for having lousy communication skills.  In this instance, my rant was about Doug focusing on technology and never ever making the case for the WHY or the need to do what he suggested in his question.  Greg then spoke to the importance of knowing your customer, congressman, market, and effectively communicating the WHY & the NEED.  Later, after the rant and aftermath of the volcanic eruption, Greg spoke to how best to approach members of congress and state legislatures.  We then talked about the RD-180 engine, SLS, & HSF spaceships.  As our discussion was ending, Greg pointed out the risks associated with putting all our HSF eggs in one basket and one company.  He closed by saying never give up plus he provided his email address at the end of the show.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach Greg through me or the address he gave out on air as the show was ending.

Rand Simberg, Monday, 6-9-14 June 10, 2014

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Rand Simberg, Monday, 6-9-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2259-BWB-2014-06-09.mp3

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Guest:  Rand Simberg.   Topics:  HSF safety, risk taking, our space dependency on Russia, and much more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back Rand Simberg for a 1 hour 36 minute discussion regarding our HSF dependency on Russia, risk taking space safety, and more.  In our first segment, Rand talked about his book, “Safe Is Not An Option” (see http://www.safeisnotanoption.com), as well as his pointing out that what he said in his book about our growing dependence on Russia for our HSF is coming to pass.  This led to a discussing of the Sen. Shelby language in the proposed NASA funding appropriations bill to account for fixed costs in a similar way such costs are accounted for in the FAR.  Rand summarized his HSF safety comments by repeating one of his better known statements that many of us agree with, that is HSF is not important!  He discussed his meaning of this statement throughout today’s program.  Rand talked about HSF being worth the risk, 16 years of ISS and only now starting to do useful things, one of which he identified as an important drug project for curing MSRA.  This discussion prompted several listener emails including one from Jim asking if we were seeing the end of NASA/government HSF?  Tony asked Rand what he would favor were he the supreme space dictator of the country.  Rand suggested returning to the old NACA model.  Later, he said HSF is not a mature industry and compared to the 1920s airplane design as that is where spaceflight design is today.  He had much to say about safety as a priority and safety regulations.

In the second segment, Ben asked him about SpaceX being qualified for AF spy satellite launches.  I asked Rand about the Dragon V2 as he was present at the unveiling.  He went inside the capsule and shared his perspectives with us.  Space settlement came up and Rand received many email questions referring to it.  He was asked about SpaceX fast tracking Dragon V2 depending on what happens with the Russians.  We talked about influencing congress and Rand suggested writing to members of congress as the count is totaled by the members.  Given the overall low numbers for the space advocacy community, getting letters to congress is important.  Near the end of the segment, he was asked about Inspiration Mars and Mars One, he talked about the serious need for a gravity lab to determine the minimal gravity prescription.  Before our discussion ended, we talked about the NRC Pathways study on HSF and Mars.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  You can contact Rand through his book website, Transterrestrial Musings (www.transterrestrial.com), or me.

Clay Mowry, Tuesday, 6-3-14 June 4, 2014

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Clay Mowry, Tuesday, 6-3-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2255-BWB-2014-06-03.mp3

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Guest:  Clayton (Clay) Mowry.  Topics:  Arianespace, launch industry, reusability, launch price and satellite capacity.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.  We welcomed back Clay Mowry to the program to discuss Arianespace and the launcher industry.  During the first segment of our 90 minute discussion, we took on the subject of the upcoming last EASA ATV 5 flight to the ISS.  Mr. Mowry explained why this program to the ISS was ending and that after this last flight, there would be only one vehicle capable of boosting the ISS.  He talked about U.S. priorities in building up cargo capability to the ISS without boost capability over commercial crew.  We also talked about the life expectancy of the ISS amid the current controversies with Russia and the US.  I asked Clay for a brief history of the launcher Ariane 5 and we learned that they now have 59 successful launches for this rocket.  Our guest talked about Ariane 5 performance capabilities plus upgrades that are in progress for an Ariane 5 ME.  We talked about launch price/cost and its relationship to how customers determine what launcher to use.  As he said the last time he was on the show, customers need launcher reliability and the ability to launch on schedule.  Launch costs are an overall factor of the total risk of the launcher, the value of the satellite, opportunity costs, infrastructure costs, and more.  This is a very informative discussion and it continued into the second segment.  Our guest also said that human spaceflight poses different issues than launching telecommunications satellites and is more sensitive to launch costs.  Listeners asked about government subsidies to Arianespace and their not turning a profit despite their commercial success. This opened up a discussion about all forms of government subsidies, including the methods used in the U.S. to subsidize and support our launcher industry.  We talked about the planned new Ariane 6 rocket and its differences with Ariane 5.  We also talked about rocket development time lines.  Rocket reusability came up and this proved to be a great discussion topic that continued into the second segment.  Clay provided us with very important perspectives regarding reusability.  Dr. Jurist called to go deeper into the issue of launch pricing, insurance, and related items. Don’t miss it.  Clay referenced several studies on this subject including the Futron NASA Ascent Study which examined launch costs among other things.  Our guest talked about ways the satellite industry is working to reduce launch costs by making satellites more powerful and lighter.  They are also starting to use ion propulsion which can cut up to 40% of the mass of the satellite which makes launches lower in cost. With more efficient satellites, longer life spans, and other advancements, its possible to see launch cost improvements up to around 20%.

In the second segment, I asked Clay what it would take to human rate the Ariane 5.  After he explained the requirements, he said their company focus was on satellites.  He mentioned Liberty Rocket, then John from Ft. Worth called in to talk about costs, depots, reusability, & just how many flights can a reusable rocket make, plus insurance risk evaluation for reusability.  Clay talked about reusability economics and risks in depth in this segment, explaining the variables and unknowns. This is an important discussion so don’t miss it.  Later by email, Jim asked about increased satellite efficiency & advanced capabilities lowering the launch rate.  Clay did not think so due to content advances and increases that offset the satellite advancements.  Again, another important discussion topic. In fact, we spent most of the balance of the program on this subject.  In concluding, Clay said the business was even more exciting today than when he joined the industry and later Arianespace.  The final listener comment asked about the launchers being the unsung heroes of our modern society.  Clay summarized that reusability had many market, technical, & economic unknowns, that HSF probably was better suited for it than satellites, & that commercial communication satellite customers need reliability & on time launches as part of their business models.

Post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach Clay Mowry through me.

 

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