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Dr. Clay Moltz, Friday, 4-11-14 April 12, 2014

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Dr. Clay Moltz, Friday, 4-11-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2226-BWB-2014-04-11.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Clay Moltz.  Topics: We discussed our guest’s new book, “Crowded Orbits: Conflict and Cooperation in Space,” plus numerous related topics.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back Dr. Clay Moltz to the show to discuss his new book “Crowded Orbits: Conflict and Cooperation in Space.”  Please remember to buy this book through the OGLF/The Space Show Amazon portal so Amazon will contribute to The Space Show.  Our Amazon instructions are in every archive summary and on each Space Show blog entry.  During the first segment of our 90 minute discussion, Dr. Moltz told us why he wrote the book which was to address orbital crowding, possible conflict in space and to bring these issues and others to the attention of the general public as space impacts everyone everyday.  A major topic for our discussion was space debris.  Using this field as an example, Dr. Moltz  made a very strong case for rules of the road, space traffic control issues, and responsible behavior by both governments and the private sector.  We talked about entrepreneurs and private groups resisting a more regulated environment and he made the case for the need for cooperation to avoid conflicts.  Early in his book, he outlined three significant points of view regarding the debate over space policy, ranging from conflict & the military use of space was inevitable so prepare for it to avoiding problems by piecemeal global engagement to increasing the use of international space projects through international governance.  Dr. Moltz received many email questions challenging a regulated environment and the need for more controls on space businesses and operations.  We talked about the cubesat technology and growth of the industry, the lack of registration, & as the industry grows, possible crowding problems.  We also discussed the U.N. treaties that seem to cover what we were talking about so why the need for more agreements & regulations?

In our second segment, we continued our human spaceflight discussion from the end of the first segment, plus we looked at space in other countries.  We mostly focused on China, India, Iran, and North Korea among others.  We talked about large scale industries that may develop over time such as SSP.  GPS was an example, then a listener asked about cyberwarfare & the impact on space policy.  Toward the end of the program, I asked about space interest among students at the Naval Postgraduate School. Students are very interested space and the subjects discussed in Clay’s book and on today’s show.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach Dr. Moltz through me.

Mark Bray, Tuesday, 2-11-14 February 12, 2014

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Mark Bray, Tuesday, 2-11-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2185-BWB-2014-02-11.mp3

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Guest:  Mark Bray.  Topics:  Huntsville area space update, SLS from the inside, U.S. space policy, leadership issues. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed back Mark Bray for a Huntsville space area update and a unique view from the inside on SLS and U.S. space policy.  In the first segment of our 1 hour 49 minute discussion, Mark shared his personal assessment of the Huntsville area space economy, the moods of contractors and NASA workers, & the space IQ for the Huntsville general population.  For the most part, Mark reported stability but lots of uncertainty.  In contrast, the last time Mark did an area update for us, there were still layoffs happening, lots of uncertainty and personal stress, and stability was far from the scene.  We then switched to SLS which was a topic through most of the show because Mark is a contractor working on SLS.  Its important to note that Mark was speaking for himself on the program, not for his employer, NASA, or his fellow workers and area space employees.  Mark works in the SLS materials lab so we asked him all sorts of questions about the big rocket.  For example, I drilled him on the mood of SLS workers given they certainly had to know about the hate-love war going on over SLS within the space community.  Mark answered all these questions for us, including questions about possible competitive pressure from SpaceX.  We talked extensively about commercial space development and the need for commercial markets.  Mark spent some time on the issue of markets because without them, one has no viable commercial activity.  Mark then honed in on the problem of political leadership regarding space saying that NASA and related organizations were not the problem. This opened the door for multiple discussions during the balance of the program going after what Mark and I both thought was an absence of quality political leadership in the country and the partisan warfare between the two main parties preventing workable solutions for many if not all the nation’s problems.  Before the segment ended, I asked Mark about the Chinese lunar lander & robot and what people thought about it.  He said most were frustrated that we (the U.S.) was not doing more as we were not operating even close to our potential.

In the second segment, Doug called to ask about public/private partnerships, COTS like programs, and he talked about his Lunar Cots ideas.  Doug asked about reducing costs.  Mark seized the opportunity to again state that engineering technology & NASA management were not the real problems but that leadership issues in Washington were at the center of the problems.  John then called from Ft. Worth.  He wanted to talk about SLS cost numbers & asked Mark why it was so expensive given the assumption that much of it came from already developed projects including Ares components and more. Don’t miss what Mark had to say about this.  John then asked Mark for his personal thoughts on the news that SpaceX will build a rocket larger than the Saturn V in about ten years.  Again, don’t miss his answer.  Near the end of the show, in summary mode, Mark repeated that the biggest challenge was a market challenge.  What is the market? Is there a long term market? How big is the market?  As the show was ending, we asked Mark about the viability of human spaceflight.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Mark Bray through me.

Rick Tumlinson, Sunday, 2-9-14 February 10, 2014

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Rick Tumlinson, Sunday, 2-9-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2183-BWB-2014-02-09.mp3

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Guest:  Rick Tumlinson.  Topics:  Commercial space ventures, space advocacy, DSI, Orbital Outfitters & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Rick Tumlinson back to the show for this 1 hour 53 minute program to discuss Rick’s commercial space ventures, space advocacy, NASA, space development and exploration challenges & methods for moving the “revolution” forward.  In the first segment, Rick opened up with updates for Deep Space Industries (DSI), asteroid mining, NEO defense, and more.  We also talked about Rules of the Road and possible industry regulation that the FAA is now talking about.  Much time was spent on possible NEO impacts.  We also started discussing the “opposition” to commercial space and new space directions over traditional aerospace programs and directions.  Following our discussion regarding DSI, we turned to another of Rick’s entrepreneurial companies, Orbital Outfitters.  Rick talked about their new & advanced spacesuit design version IS3, their opening R&D offices in Midland, Texas, plus he mentioned upcoming news with which the company will soon take public.  I asked Rick about modern day advocacy hurdles as compared to when the Space Frontier Foundation was first started.  This provoked lots of interesting comments and discussion points that crossed over into the second segment of our program.  However, he did say it was harder now so don’t miss the discussion and talking points.

In the second segment, we talked about the overall Texas commercial space development strategy, possible new spaceports for Texas, and their understanding of how the space industry is changing and becoming profitable.  We also talked about his most recent Huffington Post Op-Ed which will appear within a few days which was a reply to a Slate.com article by NYU Journalism Professor Charles Seife titled “What Is NASA For.”  You can see the article at
www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/mysteries_of_the_universe/2014/02/nasa_s_mission_its_search_for_meaning_has_limited_its_science_and_damaged.html.  While Rick pointed out the problems with the article, he also talked about the author’s perspective being valid.  Don’t miss this discussion.  We also talked about public/private partnerships with Doug & the need to be commercially profitable. Lots was said about HSF to Mars and Deimos, plus returning to the Moon.  Rick also talked science & robotic missions along with HSF missions.  As the program was ending, Rick talked Big Picture with us and being caught up in space advocacy battles & the path forward.  He talked about culture, space exploration & development benefits for all of humanity, benefit sharing, and more.  He repeated many times that we are at the cusp, a turning point, a paradigm change moment.

Please post your comments on TSS blog.  Rick provided his email address for contact during the show or you can reach him through me.

Michael Listner, Sunday, 12-1-13 December 1, 2013

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Michael Listner, Sunday, 12-1-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2133-BWB-2013-12-01.mp3

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Guest:  Michael Listner.  Topics:  Space law Review for 2013.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Michael Listner back to the program for this space law review for 2013.  On The Space Show blog at the end of the summary, you will find two presentations uploaded at Michael’s request.  In the first segment of this 1 hour 57 minute discussion, Michael said it was a fruitful year for space law and policy.  He suggested that the paradigm changer was private space development, at both the state and the federal legal picture.  He talked much about the Outer Space Treaty (OST) which provides the legal basis for the U.S. to exercise control over its citizens launching anything to space anywhere in the world.  This subject came up in reference to Mars One and some statements Michael made regarding there wanting to go elsewhere to avoid Dutch law.  Michael explained how the OST presents the Dutch government with the same obligation for its citizens around the world as is the case with the U.S.  Michael then brought us current with the European Code of Conduct, current modifications, and the impact it might have on U.S. space entrepreneurs and launchers such as SpaceX.  He talked about how regulations get enforced as law & how they would make the voluntary code legally binding in our country.  We talked about the need to get an FAA launch license for private companies and how that might be unavailable depending on regulations and political issues.  For a government mission, there is no launch license requirement.  This point was stressed when using SLS for Inspiration Mars came up for discussion.

In the second segment (note we had a phone interruption so there was a short additional break though most of it was edited out), there were several email questions and comments regarding Tito’s recent Inspiration Mars congressional testimony and what it might mean for space law issues if the mission became a NASA project.  Allen asked a question about state law, specifically in California.  Michael explained the relationship between state and federal law in space matters.  During the discussion, Michael referenced many papers by different authors applicable to our discussion. Here are the links to those papers:  Henry Hertzfeld & Scott Pace: http://science.time.com/2013/11/28/hands-off-our-lunar-landing-sites-not-so-fast; National Space Transportation Policy:
www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/national_space_transportation_policy_11212013.pdf; Established Practices for Human Spaceflight Occupant Safety www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/national_space_transportation_policy_11212013.pdf; Space Review article on commercial spaceflight self-regulation: www.thespacereview.com/article/2252/1; FAA decision: www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-02/html/2013-28405.htm.  Our guest talked about these items during both segments of our show, stressing the geopolitical component.  Near the end of the program, we talked about laws to protect the lunar Apollo landing sites and artifacts.  In his concluding remarks, our guest stressed the need to play by the rules.  Such rules may consist of state, federal, and international laws and regulations. Michael also talked about Bigelow Aerospace and his lunar cots like program suggested with NASA.

If you have questions/comments for Michael, post them on The Space Show blog. You can reach Michael through his website at www.spacelawsolutions.com.

Relationship of space law with traditional law

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Dr. Roger Launius, Friday, 11-29-13 November 30, 2013

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Dr. Roger Launius, Friday, 11-29-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2132-BWB-2013-11-29.mp3

Guest:  Dr. Roger Launius.  Topics:  We discussed Roger’s new book, “Space Shuttle Legacy: How We Did It and What We Learned,” space shuttles lessons learned, HSF & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed back Dr. Roger Launius to discuss his new book, “Space Shuttle Legacy: How We Did It and What We Learned.”  During the first segment of this 1 hour 25 minute discussion, Dr. Launius provided us with the background behind this book which Dr. Launius and two other co-edited as a result of a suggestion Dr. Vigor Yang, chair of the School of Aerospace Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and James Craig, emeritus professor the school.  Dr. Launius took us through the book’s contents including the title, subject, and authors of the contributions to this book. Our guest talked about the time we spent in LEO, that it was frustrating to many but it did create the situation where LEO is no longer a space frontier.  We also talked about how the shuttle paved the way for development of NewSpace and the emerging commercial industry.  This pertains to the Washington Post article we discussed. See the URL for this article at the end of this summary.  Listeners asked him questions about the Constellation program, the use of shuttle derived architecture for Constellation rockets, and capsules versus winged spacecraft.  We also talked about commercial opportunities emerging in LEO.  A listener asked about the cost of the Soyuz for American astronaut rides to the ISS and that it was still cheaper than launching a shuttle.  Roger brought up other concerns regarding the use of the Soyuz for transport to the station.  John from Ft. Worth called and said he thought shuttle was a creation of compromise. Dr. Launius was then asked about SLS & Orion which took us into human spaceflight and the difficulty in identifying a compelling reason for HSF.  We talked about inspiration as a compelling reason but our guest said it did not hold up as there were other ways to inspire students and people.  We spoke about the Inspiration Mars mission and Mr. Tito’s recent congressional testimony.  We then talked about Dr. Zubrin’s plan to partner up with Russia for a manned mission to Mars.

In our second segment, we talked about the ISS, NANORACKS and its success, emerging ISS commercial opportunities.  However, the possible retirement of the station around 2020 is worrisome.  John emailed in wondering if the Chinese landed humans on the Moon if it would make a difference in our space program.  I asked our guest for a few of the Lessons Learned from the shuttle and we talked more about it having been an experimental aircraft and what that meant.  We got questions about new technology, advancing using new technology, and then more comments about capsules and winged spacecraft.  Roger was asked to speculate on what would happen with a subcortical accident with injury or death and an orbital accident causing crew injury or death.  As the show was nearing its end, we talked about space advocacy, its effectiveness, and the lack of a unified voice in the space community. Finally, I asked our guest for specific positive and negative lessons learned from the shuttle years.  Note that the WaPo article referred to in the discussion comparing old space with NewSpace is at www.washingtonpost.com/sf/national/2013/11/23/which-way-to-space.

Post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog per above.  You can email Dr. Launius through me.

William (Bill) Harwood, Sunday, 11-24-13 November 25, 2013

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William (Bill) Harwood, Sunday, 11-24-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2128-BWB-2013-11-24.mp3

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Guest: William (Bill) Harwood.  Topics:  SpaceX Falcon 9 GEO Launch, space policy, suborbital issues and more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Bill Harwood, the CBS News space consultant to the show.  During the first segment of our 90 minute program, Bill told us about his press conference and briefing with Elon Musk, the CTO from SES, the company sending the first GEO bird to orbit on the Falcon 9 on Monday afternoon, 11-25-13, and Ms. Shotwell of SpaceX.  Most of the first segment was spent discussing the press conference, the comments about the launch made by all participants, the challenges of doing the first GEO launch for the new Falcon 9 V1.1 and more.  Not only did Bill go over the details of the launch and the SES satellite orbital insertion, plus the Falcon 9 plans for second stage firing and getting in position for the satellite to take over for its part, we talked about SpaceX launch costs, we compared the Falcon 9 costs as best we could to the Arianne and the ILS Proton costs.  Bill was asked about the thoughts of the Falcon 9 competition and what it might mean for a SpaceX success with their first GEO launch.  Also in this segment, Bill was asked about Inspiration Mars, SLS, & Orion.  Other topics included space settlement, suborbital flight, Virgin Galactic, robotic missions, and the why that justifies HSF.  As the segment was ending, a listener asked about the Florida space coast economy and its economic recovery.

In the second segment, Bill was asked if SpaceX was creating a new market or taking market share from the existing competition.  We talked about NASA story telling for a better space policy, the JFK legacy, & space being treated by many as a luxury.  I asked Bill about the private sector being able to kick start space industry development and Bill responded with information how hard space was, especially orbital space which requires speeds of 85 football fields per second.  Dream Chaser and its recent accident were discussed and there was lots of listener support for Dream Chaser as there was from our guest.  More was said about the potential market for suborbital tourism and flights.  Bill was asked about the biggest change over the years in his covering space issues and he said it was the change in politics.  I asked him about his reporting during both Challenger and Columbia. As the program closed, Bill was asked about the ISS, commercial development for the station, and the need to keep the station going beyond 2020.

Post your comments/questions to The Space Show blog above.  You can email Mr. Harwood through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Dan Adamo, Dr. Jim Logan, Dr. John Jurist, Tuesday, 11-19-13 November 19, 2013

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THE SPACE SHOW CLASSROOM

Dan Adamo, Dr. Jim Logan, Dr. John Jurist, Tuesday, 11-19-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2125-BWB-2013-11-19.mp3

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Guests:  Dan Adamo, Dr. Jim Logan, Dr. John Jurist.  Topics:  “Trajectory Challenges Faced By Orbiting Infrastructure Supporting Multiple Earth Departures For Mars.”  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

Welcome to this special Space Show Classroom program with Dan Adamo, Dr. Logan, Dr. Jurist, and myself.  There was no break during this 2 hour 21 minute discussion which at times was very technical.  For those of you interested in missions to Mars, orbiting space infrastructure including depots, Earth & LEO departure points, mission and launch trades, payload issues and trades, radiation concerns, and more, you will find this discussion to be extremely informative and educational.  Guest Dan Adamo took us through the charts and graphs which you can access on either The Space Show Blog or The Space Show Classroom blog ((see http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com and http://spaceshowclassroom.wordpress.com).  Access the document ReuseForMars to follow the MP3 audio transcript. The other document on the blogs is a longer white paper version of the .pdf we used for last night’s discussion.  Dan introduced the topic to us, talked about his tangential work in this area at JSC last summer and the space community interest in orbiting infrastructure, especially fuel depots.  Dan then took us through the .pdf document discussing and explaining each chart and graph.  Rather than report on his page by page discussion, note that Jim, John, and I asked lots of questions per each chart and graph as did listeners by email and later in the discussion by phone.  Some of the main points and take aways from this discussion focused on inclination, launch location, penalties and advantages relating to orbiting infrastructure reuse for Earth departures to interplanetary destinations. For example, Russian launch sites are far to the north and will not be as efficient for Mars launches as sites to the south.  But as Doug discovered when he asked about equatorial launches, they benefit from a boost due to the inertial rotation of the Earth for higher initial launch speed, but otherwise there is no real benefit from the equatorial launch because minimum Earth orbit inclination is imposed by interplanetary geometry.  Another important point had to do with the reuse of orbital infrastructure.  As you will hear, it’s virtually worthless to reuse infrastructure in low Earth orbit to support Mars mission departure, including a depot, unless it can be repurposed for something else other than a Mars mission.  Don’t miss Dan’s explanation of this.  While we talked about Earth departure windows for Mars at two year intervals, we learned that not all these windows are equal.  Here, using the tables in Dan’s document, we were able to see just how unequal the Earth departure windows can be.  We talked a lot about Elliptical Earth Parking Orbit (EEPO) and the relationships with apogee and perigee for our payload departures for Mars.  Later, Dan outlined how we can “store” the cryo in the upperstage of our rocket as kinetic energy in the EEPO shortly after launch, a way to store the cryo energy without having to mitigate boiloff or transfer it between spacecraft.  Much was said about radiation and when you go through the trajectories and see them plotted as Dan has done, we learned that not all trajectories are equal as to radiation exposure.  Other important elements of our discussion that we focused on included the trans-Mars Injection (TMI) and asymptotic Earth departure velocity (v_infinity).  Listener Jimmy emailed us about another paper by a Goddard team that Dan was familiar with and he used some of their data and research.  Access their poster at www.lpi.usra.edu/sbag/science/NHATS_Accessible_NEAs_Summary.png (note you may need to cut & paste the URL in your browser).  As Dan & our Classroom panel went through charts, graphs, & tables, we applied the information to launches Earth departures in 2020 and 2022.  It was valuable to see how the constraints change, not always for the better either.  Note that we started with a 400 KM orbit but later dropped it to about 340 km above earth.  I suspect you will find the changing constraints and parameters to be more than interesting.  Near the end, Doug called in to ask about the reuse of the repurposing orbital infrastructure, including depots, as possible infrastructure for the Moon or a cislunar project.  Not only is this a possibility, we learned that something like the orbits that would be involved in doing this were used for the recent NASA GRAIL Mission.  During our discussion throughout the program, we talked about the two Mars missions now en route to Mars, Maven and the Indian mission Mangalyaan.  Note what was said about Mangalyaan and how it is making use of the type of information we discussed in this program to do a lower energy mission to Mars.  In fact, one of the hot topics of our discussion was the comparison between long-way trajectories and short-way trajectories to Mars, what each means for arrival at Mars, capture by Mars, and the return to Earth and capture by Earth.  The reentry speed coming back to Earth is crucial as these speeds can be extremely fast with lots of heat to dissipate.  Keeping speeds below 12k/s for a human Mars mission is vital.

Please post your comments/questions on our blogs and we will do our best to respond to you.  If you want to reach any of our guests, do so through me using drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Dan’s charts and graphs are here:  MultipleMarsDeparturesR1

To best follow tonight’s discussion, refer to;  ReuseForMars

Jamie Guined, Sunday, 11-17-13 November 18, 2013

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Jamie Guined, Sunday, 11-17-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2123-BWB-2013-11-17.mp3

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Guest:  Jamie Guined.   Topics:  Spaceflight Fitness Specialist (SFS) certification & exercise physiology for human factors in HSF.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Jamie Guined to the show to discuss her new business start-up which is offering the first ever professional credential designed to provide fitness professionals with the knowledge and skills needed to support commercial spaceflight aerospace and the related medical team, the Spaceflight Fitness Specialist Credential (www.launch-fitness.com).  During the first segment of our 1 hour 32 minute program, Jamie talked about her exercise physiology and science background, some of the work she does in this and related fields at NASA JSC, and why she decided to set up this credentialed program.  Jamie spoke about the physical conditioning problems of the general public and chronic disease which largely goes unmanaged. She explained how this can show up in human spaceflight with the space tourists flights about to happen and the general public going to space rather than only well trained military and government astronauts.  In discussing the purpose and reach of her new program, our guest was asked if the program provided training for mental issues in an emergency. Here she referred to another guest from earlier this year who does have such a program. We learned that her credentialed program is for exercise fitness professionals, not the end user.  Listeners wanted to know if her credentialed program might be overkill for suborbital flights and I asked about applying the NASA information on exercise physiology, say with bone loss and osteoporosis, to the general public not interested in space but needing physical therapy or an exercise routine to mitigate bone issues.  Heather called in to ask Jamie what she thought the ideal attributes would be for the fitness expert seeking certification.  Doug called in to talk about FAA and DOT physical exams & adopting the information to lifestyle management medicine.  They talked about stress tests, counter measures, and centrifuge studies.

In the second segment, Jamie talked about her five year business plan and the need to understand the functional movement of the spaceflight candidate.  We spent some time talking about functional movement and body limitations.  We also learned that Jamie does screening for those interested in coming to Houston for a day or so to be evaluated.  We also talked about the specific of the credentialed program which will be made public shortly.  Its an online course with a year to complete and a written exam at the end of it.  Jamie pointed out the use of credible accreditation organizations for the certification, we talked about working with people outside the U.S. and any potential differences.  Jamie mentioned Americans as leading the pack in hypokinetic disorders.  Near the end, our guest was asked if the certification program had mitigation strategies for avoiding space sickness.  Jamie repeated that this was an emerging market and industry and she again explained why it was important for her to be the first to market.  As the show was about to end, Harriet asked Jamie about her consulting role with Mars One.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog. Jamie provided her email address in the second segment of the program or you can contact her through her website or me.

Richard David, Thursday, 11-7-13 November 8, 2013

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Richard David, Thursday, 11-7-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2117-BWB-2013-11-07.mp3

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Guest:  Richard David.   Topics:  Commercial space business evaluation, NewSpace emerging industry with winners.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Richard David back to the show for this special Thursday one hour discussion about NewSpace industry evaluations and the recently held NewSpace Investor Conference.  Richard started out talking about the event and the focus on markets and investors.  Other topics included the essentials of building a viable business and the evaluations of emerging entrepreneurial companies by NewSpace Global (NSG) in the various lists and reports (see www.newspaceglobal.com).  Richard talked about the variety of companies participating in the event ranging from SpaceX to very small startups and emerging companies.  He said the group was very diverse representing all aspects of commercial space development and management styles.  Richard then named several companies as examples.  We talked about timelines for NewSpace company development and at one point I asked him to compare NewSpace timelines to Twitter which had just gone public.  Twitter was started in March 2006 and we talked about the differences in challenges and other issues giving NewSpace longer timelines.  I asked Richard to talk about commercial development over the past three years, what makes it different today from three years ago, and do we need a Netscape moment or steady growth.  Richard was asked to tell us the major challenges or hurdles he believes exists for these emerging companies.  He listed and discussed four such challenges.  You might be surprised to find out that regulatory challenges were not among his top four hurdles.  Toward the end of our discussion, I asked about business opportunities for human spaceflight.  I also inquired about entrepreneurial opportunities from outside the U.S.  Richard said 75% of the activity comes from with the United States.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above. Richard can be contacted through his website.

Dr. Anita Sengupta, Friday, 11-1-13 November 2, 2013

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Dr. Anita Sengupta, Friday, 11-1-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2113-BWB-2013-11-01.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Anita Sengupta.  Topics:  Cold Atom Lab (CAL) project, human spaceflight EDL & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed back Dr. Anita Sengupta to discuss the Cold Atom Lab (CAL) project for which Dr. Sengupta is the project manager.  CAL is to launch to the ISS in early 2016, probably aboard the SpaceX Dragon though that has yet to be confirmed but the project needs a ride on a pressurized spacecraft.  For more information on the CAL project and mission, check out these websites: http://coldatomlab.jpl.nasa.gov; http://coldatomlab.jpl.nasa.gov/news/FunPhysicsResearch. During this 64 minute discussion, Dr. Sengupta explained the CAL project to us, ultra cool quantum gasses in absolute zero and in zero gravity to establish a Force Free Environment which means no gravity pull.  We talked about laser cooling and the series of experiments likely to be done on the ISS with CAL based on the NASA Research Announcement which has a submittal date of Nov. 5, 2013.  We talked about atomic physics and many related topics, including the mechanics of the project, the need to place CAL in a rack as close to the center of gravity on the ISS as possible for the closest point to zero gravity. Listeners asked lots of questions about CAL, but they also had questions for Anita  regarding her expertise in entry, descent, and landing (EDL) from her recent work with Curiosity and the super sonic parachute.  In talking about human spaceflight, at one point Anita remarked that CAL was a hybrid project as it is definitely a robotic science mission but they interface with the ISS astronauts so CAL and the team have feet in both worlds.  In talking about the CAL hardware, we learned it was designed as an ORU, an orbital replacement unit.  Doug called in regarding EDL on Mars from Phobos and the use of strategically placed propellant depots in orbit around Mars and how that might simply a Martian EDL.  Anita provided much technical information on this subject and we learned that the actual EDL is driven by the entry mass and the need to dissipate energy. She talked about the difference in  a human EDL protocol and a robotic mission EDL protocol and said the human EDL has not yet been devised or worked out.  Near the end of the program, Anita explained more about laser cooling, including photons pushing atoms which slows them down and makes them cooler.  This enables more accurate laser tuning for the research. Susan asked her if she learned about the engineering for her project from grad school or from OJT.  As you will hear, the basics from grad school and the specifics OTJ.  Near the end of our program, we talked about the role of a project manager and auditing Anita’s USC class which might be possible when she teaches an upcoming graduate class online. We also talked about career choices and would one rather work on a humans to Mars flight or robotic missions.

Please post comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  Dr. Sengupta provided her contact information on air at the end of the program or you can email her through me if you prefer.

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