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Doug Messier, Tuesday, 2-18-14 February 19, 2014

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Doug Messier, Tuesday, 2-18-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2190-BWB-2014-02-18.mp3

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Guest:  Doug Messier.  Topics: We discussed a wide range of topics from Google space to space tourism, technology & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htmFor those of you listening to archives on live365.com & rating the programs, please email me the reasons for your rating.  This will definitely help improve Space Show programming. Thank you.

We welcomed back Doug Messier, Managing Editor of ParabolicArc.com for this 1 hour 43 minute discussion.  During our first segment, Doug talked about the proposed Google space program involving up to 1,600 satellites for global communication and wifi.  Doug shared with us as much information as was currently known regarding this program, plus he talked about the Loon Project and explained why he referred to the multiple satellite program as “Son of Teledesic.”  While no launch vehicle has been identified Doug and listeners did talk about the possible impact launch services needed for such a large program.  Doug also reported on Masten Space Systems. He also talked about Masten in the second segment.  Many listeners sent in emails about the proposed Google program, some expressing skepticism, some wanting more information.  Doug then turned his attention to Virgin Galactic and he talked about their powered test flights, engine issues, possible hybrid replacement engines, and more.  We talked about the signed up Virgin passengers and PR efforts to keep them informed of Virgin’s progress.  Doug also briefed us on XCOR and the Google Lunar XPrize contest.  A listener emailed in about the decline of the California aerospace industry and state regulatory issues.  Doug had much to say about this.  Before the break, a listener asked for an update on Stratolaunch.

In the second segment, Doug talked about the management changes at Virgin given three executives have left in recent times.  In addition, he said some of the lower level employees were sending out resumes.  In response to a question, he updated us on Virgin’s Launcher One.  We talked about Dream Chaser test flights, the name change at Dryden, & the NASA Ames name.  Near the end he gave us a brief report on Garvey Space, then Dr. Lurio called in and they discussed at length the Virgin hybrid engine issues, vehicle modifications, & the possibilities for a replacement engine.  Doug commented that they may not make it to 100KM!  As the program was ending, Doug said it would be an interesting year, that he thought there would be crewed vehicle flights later this year, and then he shared his thoughts regarding possible commercial crew downsizing. During this segment, I asked Doug to comment on his most exciting and frustrating stories of last year.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog. Doug can be reached through me or through ParabolicArc.com.

Richard David, Thursday, 11-7-13 November 8, 2013

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Richard David, Thursday, 11-7-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2117-BWB-2013-11-07.mp3

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Guest:  Richard David.   Topics:  Commercial space business evaluation, NewSpace emerging industry with winners.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Richard David back to the show for this special Thursday one hour discussion about NewSpace industry evaluations and the recently held NewSpace Investor Conference.  Richard started out talking about the event and the focus on markets and investors.  Other topics included the essentials of building a viable business and the evaluations of emerging entrepreneurial companies by NewSpace Global (NSG) in the various lists and reports (see www.newspaceglobal.com).  Richard talked about the variety of companies participating in the event ranging from SpaceX to very small startups and emerging companies.  He said the group was very diverse representing all aspects of commercial space development and management styles.  Richard then named several companies as examples.  We talked about timelines for NewSpace company development and at one point I asked him to compare NewSpace timelines to Twitter which had just gone public.  Twitter was started in March 2006 and we talked about the differences in challenges and other issues giving NewSpace longer timelines.  I asked Richard to talk about commercial development over the past three years, what makes it different today from three years ago, and do we need a Netscape moment or steady growth.  Richard was asked to tell us the major challenges or hurdles he believes exists for these emerging companies.  He listed and discussed four such challenges.  You might be surprised to find out that regulatory challenges were not among his top four hurdles.  Toward the end of our discussion, I asked about business opportunities for human spaceflight.  I also inquired about entrepreneurial opportunities from outside the U.S.  Richard said 75% of the activity comes from with the United States.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above. Richard can be contacted through his website.

The John Batchelor Show Hotel Mars, Wednesday, 10-16-13 October 17, 2013

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The John Batchelor Show Hotel Mars, Wednesday, 10-16-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2106-BWB-2013-10-16.mp3

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Guests: John Batchelor, Dr. Joan Johnson-Freese, Gordon Chang Dr. David Livingston:  Topics:  ITAR, NASA & Chinese restriction, Kepler Conference at AMES.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We do not permit the commercial use of any Space Show program or part thereof, nor do we permit Space Show programs to be edited, placed on YouTube, or other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted in news articles, papers, academic & research work but must be cited or referenced in the proper citation format. Contact Dr. Livingston for questions about our copyright and trademark policies which we do enforce.  This program is archived on The Space Show website, podcasting, and blog sites with permission from John Batchelor. Please visit the John Batchelor Show website for more information about this fine program, www.johnbatchelorshow.com.  Remember, your Amazon Purchases Can Help Support The Space Show/OGLF (www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm).

 During our 11 minute plus discussion, John, Dr. Joan Johnson-Freese, Gordon Chang  and I talked about recent restrictions placed on Chinese students and space industry professionals in attending the Kepler Conference to be held at NASA Ames.  We talked ITAR in general, the Chinese space program which is not a civil program, ITAR’s lack of standards and enforcement, and related issues.  We also discussed related national security issues and choices available to NASA based on congressional actions on these issues.

Please post any comments/questions you might have on The Space Show blog.  You can contact any of  us through drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Open Lines, Sunday, 11-19-12 November 19, 2012

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Open Lines, Sunday, 11-19-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1895-BWB-2012-11-18.mp3

Guest:  Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  Space Show surveys & feedback, SatCon 2012, post election space policy & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. Welcome to our nearly 2.5 hour Open Lines discussion on a wide range of topics. Most of our topics covered the entire show so this summary is in just one segment. In addition to a few talking points at the beginning of the show, I stressed the need for more Space Show listener feedback and the use of possible surveys.  The survey issue came up with several callers and many ideas for surveys were put forth.  If you have ideas or suggestions for better Space Show feedback including the use of surveys, please post your ideas on The Space Show blog. In addition, we had some strange phone line issues throughout this program.  We are working to track down what happened but since there is no call waiting at our end, I’m not sure the problems were with our equipment.  Regardless, The Space Show apologizes for the phone line distractions. Daniel, a first responder, called in with a brief summary of the recently completed SatCon 2012 Conference in NYC.  He had some very interesting things to share with us, especially about national security satellite issues.  Check out this conference at www.satconexpo.com. Tim called to talk about our recent program regarding JP Aerospace.  Tim said he was working the numbers and does not feel that an airship can make it to orbit.  Let us know if you agree with Tim.  By the way, others on earlier programs have made it clear that they do not believe JP can get an airship to orbit.  In the meantime, John continues to work the problem and best of luck to him and his crew in figuring out how to reach his goal.  Doug called in and we talked post election space policy. A few other callers did the same thing including John from Atlanta.  I really had no great insights to bring to the table but I suspect that more likely based on how things go with the economy and sequestration, the status quo will prevail on space policy.  That said, the SLS program might actually be a target of NASA budget cuts over the next few years but it is way too early to tell.  Some listeners seemed to want a partisan discussion on policy and I did my best to avoid it though I did disclose my dislike for our two main political parties.  I was also clear that the private sector engaged in capital acquisition was at risk through increased regulation, taxes, inflation, etc.  Like everyone, I am hopeful that risk capital will remain strong and space ventures will be able to grow in their share of this unique investor market, but it is a fragile market given our economic situation and the uncertainties ahead of us at this time.  John from Winterhaven called about my comments regarding doing something with one’s ideas and concepts over and above just speaking the words or writing a paper. I referred to this throughout our discussion as “breathing life” into one’s concepts/ideas.  I am also planning a full Space Show on this subject.  Other topics included news stories on the Falcon engine problems and EML2 NASA missions.
     Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.

Gary Hudson, Tuesday, 5-29-12 May 30, 2012

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Gary Hudson, Tuesday, 5-29-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1784-BWB-2012-05-29.mp3

Guest:  Gary Hudson.  Topic:  Variable gravity research station as a free flyer near the ISS.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed back Gary Hudson, President of the Space Studies Institute, to discuss the Space Studies Institute variable gravity research station program known as G-Lab.  You can read about G-Lab at http://ssi.org/2012/04/ssi-update-april-2012-introduction-to-g-lab.  To find out more about The Space Studies Institute, please visit http://ssi.org.  In our first segment, Gary Hudson provided us with an overview of the data points we have on the effect of microgravity on the human body dating back from the beginning of the space age.  If the goal is the permanent human expansion and settlement in space, we have very few if any data points, yet we need this information if we are to expand beyond short trips to the ISS or another turnaround lunar mission.  In terms of artificial gravity, we don’t know what levels humans require other than we know we are designed for 1 G.  As Gary pointed out several times during our discussion, the permanent settlement in space implies families, child birth, and the things that we do here on Earth but we are lacking any meaningful and relevant information to make this possible  The G-Lab concept is to be able to do long term properly designed centrifuge research in free flying labs around the ISS, doing animal studies in lunar, possibly Martian, and Earth gravity. The experiments would be long term, properly designed by researchers with NASA as well as other institutions.  Financing the project would be in segments and phases and involve the private sector & the public sector.  Mr. Hudson described five phases with the first three phases being privately funded while the last two a combination of public/private funding.  The Falcon Heavy is a possible launch vehicle but so are other launchers.

In our second segment, we started off with a listener question about a Space Review article suggestion the Dragon be used for microgravity experiments in support of a human Mars Mission.  You can read the article by Tom Hill at www.thespacereview.com/article/2089/1.  Gary commented on this but remained focused on their project supporting permanent settlement in space, not just a trip to Mars.  This is an important distinction so do listen to how Gary explains this difference.  Other listeners asked Gary questions based on other Space Show programs/guests dealing with genetic modification and the need to work with gravity here on Earth as we age.  Listeners suggested simpler experiments.  One person suggested using insects but Gary made it clear that animals with a backbone were essential for these studies.  As the segment was drawing to a close, Gary mentioned a few of the challenges other than funding including power, life support, human crew needs, keeping the lab animals healthy, and being able to carry out all the needed experiments.  We talked about funding and Gary mentioned philanthropic naming opportunities for the centrifuge labs just as donors name buildings at hospitals and universities here on Earth.  If you have comments/questions for Gary Hudson, please post them on the Space Show blog.

If you want to get in touch with Gary specifically for this project, you can e-mail him through their website by using the About tab, then selecting Officers and Board.

Josh Neubert, Friday, 12-16-11 December 16, 2011

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Josh Neubert, Friday, 12-16-11

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1673-BWB-2011-12-16.mp3

 Guest:  Josh Neubert.  Topics:  Night Rover Challenge, NASA Centennial Challenges, educational outreach.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  The Space Show/OGLF is now engaged in its annual fundraising drive. Please see & act upon our appeal at http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com/2011/11/21/space-show-2011-fundraising-campaign.  We welcomed Josh Neubert back to the program to discuss the  NASA Centennial Challenge, The Night Rover Challenge.  Please visit these websites for more information and email alerts:  www.nightrover.org and www.nasa.gov/offices/oct/early_stage_innovation/centennial_challenges/night_rover/index.html.  This was a one hour discussion without a break.  Josh started out by describing the Night Rover Challenge which is to develop mobile systems to collect solar energy, store that energy, and later use it productively.  The innovation will consolidate in a contest for simulated lunar rovers maximizing energy to run for two weeks day and night and survive the cold lunar night.  Josh told us about the Challenge time line and the sole focus on solar power and storage.  As you will hear, the prize is $1.5 million with first, second, and third place winners.  Terry asked technical questions about the potential battery packs and the maximum size of the rovers.  We learned that the biggest size would probably be in the range of the Curiosity rover on the way to Mars with a much smaller size on the other end of the measurements.  Michael asked if the power sources would be required to meet the legal standards required under international law to preserve the environment of outer space in regards to potential hazardous materials that may contaminate the outer space environment. Josh said yes, those standards would be part of the requirements for the competition.  Several listeners asked if non-U.S. citizens could participate in the Challenge and if there were ITAR considerations.  We learned that non-U.S. citizens could participate but were not eligible to win the prize money.  I asked who was most likely to participate in the challenge. Josh suggested students of all ages and grades, plus the do it yourself community, entrepreneurs, smaller businesses, etc.  We also talked about sponsorship opportunities as NASA does not cover operating expenses.  Another listener asked about the use of social media for the Night Rover outreach program.  As you will hear, this Challenge will make use of both social media and collaboration in getting the message out and participants in the challenge.  Near the end of the program, we discussed the proximity ofSilicon Valley, NASA Ames, and the significance of these communities to all the contestants involved in the challenge.  Josh closed by stressing how this program inspires, excites, and jump starts the best and the brightest to innovate, be creative, and to produce!  If you have questions about the Night Rover Challenge, there is a contact link on their website.  Please post your Space Show comments/questions on the blog URL above.

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