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Jeremy Straub, Dr. Ronald Marsh, Monday, 8-18-14 August 19, 2014

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Jeremy Straub, Dr. Ronald Marsh, Monday, 8-18-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2298-BWB-2014-08-18.mp3

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Guests:  Jeremy Straub, Dr. Ronald Marsh.  Topics:  NSF Grant to UND Computer Science for undergraduate satellite mission critical development software.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Jeremy Straub and Dr. Ronald Marsh to the program to discuss the NSF Grant awarded the University of North Dakota (UND) computer science department for undergraduate summer work to design and develop mission critical software for cubesats.  During the first segment of our 90 minute program, Jeremy Straub introduced us to the UND programs and Open Orbiter.  You can read more about these programs by visiting http://webapp.und.edu/dept/our/uletter/?p=48008.  Also, take note of the computer science dept. website where program registration will soon be announced, http://cs.und.edu.  Jeremy described the programs, Open Orbiter, the undergraduate student participation and expectations, transfer credits, and more. Dr. Marsh, the Computer Science Dept. Head, talked about the role of the computer science department, & why this program was in this department and not Space Studies or the School of Engineering.  Listeners asked questions about the program & the possibility of mission critical software development for BLEO cubesats as well as possible commercial applications.  We learned that this was an academic program and it might not lead to the actual launch of a functioning cubesat.  Jeremy described the additional key activities associated with the grant including a visit to missile system complex, JPL, and a high altitude balloon launch.

In the second segment, Charles Pooley called in to promote Microlaunchers and to again talk about the problem with secondary payloads which cubesats rely upon for their launches.  Jeremy talked about government sponsored cubesat launch programs including the NASA ELaNA program, ESA programs, the U.S. CubeSat Program, and the University Nanosat Program.  In response to the comments by Charles, I talked about the complex benefits students get from working with these secondary payload launch programs and opportunities.  One listener asked if computer wise high school students could participate in the program. To do so, students must be enrolled in a college or university.  Jeremy also said all the rules would be published when the application process opens up in the near future.  We talked about open source work, the program starting in the summer of 2015, that it would be an on campus 10 week program with no upper limit to the number of students that would be accepted into the program.  We talked about gender issues and shortages in computer science with Dr. Marsh and we learned that employers do not accept distance learning students as they want the students they hire to have attended on campus classes. Near the end of the program I inquired about the various UND cubesat programs that have appeared over the past few years.  In talking to Dr. Marsh about his department, we learned that it was not impacted & all classes are available.  As many of you know, this is not the case with many larger schools across the country.

Please post comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach either guest through me.

 

Gwynne Shotwell, Friday, 3-21-14 March 21, 2014

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Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX, Friday, 3-21-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2212-BWB-2014-03-21.mp3

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Guest:  Gwynne Shotwell.   Topics:  SpaceX, their goals, mission, & launch vehicles.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Gwynne Shotwell, President & Chief Operating Officer of SpaceX back to the show for an hour discussion & Q&A from the listeners.  During the first hour segment of this 72 minute program, Ms. Shotwell started out with me asking questions prior to opening the program to the listeners.  I inquired about using Brownsville, TX as a spaceport, SpaceX qualification requirements & timelines to fly sensitive USAF costly spy satellites to orbit, reusability, the possible use of Falcon & Dragon for a lunar mission, and fast tracking Dragon for HSF given the problem with Russia, the Crimea, and the Ukraine.  Gwynne told us about New Dragon and modifications to it and theCRS-3 Dragon contamination concerns for the upcoming launch on March 30.  About 20 minutes into the discussion, I opened it up for listener emails and phone calls.  I did have some audio issues with the toll free line so I apologize in advance for them but all the callers were clear and understandable as the problems concerned the toll free line ringing.  Listner questions addressed launch pad modifications for larger rockets, the SpaceX Raptor, reusability, possible payload penalties with reusability, propulsive landings, and reusable launch vehicle trajectories.  One listener asked our guest about possible markets for the bigger Falcon heavy lift launcher, Falcon XX.  We learned that this size rocket was for human transportation to Mars.  Gwynne fielded several questions about Falcon and Dragon on lunar missions.  While not opposed to lunar missions, SpaceX does not want to be distracted from their primary objective which is Mars.  Another listener asked about pricing and secondary payloads, the launch abort system, then I asked about SpaceX near term challenges and longer out challenges to 10-11 years from now.  Our guest was asked about berthing and when SpaceX would dock with the ISS.  Later in the segment there was a question about competition in the launcher industry, if SLS was viewed as competition, using a Falcon for a Europa or Titan mission, & the difference between Air Force requirements and special NASA requirements.  As the segment was drawing to a close, a high school student asked about internships at SpaceX.  Gwynne also talked about how valuable & important their relationship with NASA has been and how NASA has been a large part of their success.

In the very short second segment, I went over the upcoming Space Show schedule and let the audience know several dates when there would be no programming due to Easter & my personal schedule.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.

Charles Pooley & Ed LeBouthillier, Monday, 1-13-14 January 14, 2014

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Charles Pooley & Ed LeBouthillier, Monday, 1-13-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2164-BWB-2014-01-13.mp3

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Guests:  Charles Pooley &Ed LeBouthillier.  Topics:  The Microlauncher concept and new book just published.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Charles Pooley back to the show along with his co-author Ed LeBouthillier to discuss the first Microlaunchers book,  “Microlaunchers: Technology for a New Space Age.”  For more information, visit www.microlaunchers.com. Remember, if you order the book through Amazon, please do so through the OGLF Amazon portal which is listed on TSS website, TSS blog, and in all archive summary statements.  If you have questions about this, email me.  It is important for TSS to receive these contributions from Amazon.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 33 minute program, Charles and Ed talked with us about the Microlaunchers concept and how that concept is depicted in the book.  We also learned how Charles and Ed met and the role each had in writing and completing this book.  Our first caller Jeff from Tucson won the give away copy of the book.  Jeff also asked our guests about the role of cubesats in the Microlaunchers concept specifically for LEO and then GEO.  This led to Charles talking with us about secondary payloads and why he does not favor them.  Charles & Ed then described some of the Microlaunchers launch parameters, then we took a question from Paul in Boston who wanted to ask about market concerns for the Microlauncher concept.  Doug from S. California was the next caller with three specific issues to raise with our two guests.  We also talked about payload mass and the path to a larger system, including the GEO market.  As the segment ended, Charles put forth his payload pricing goals for his system.

In the second segment, we started out with Ed describing the organization of the book into three main sections. Next, our guests fielded questions about propulsion.  Charles said they were using a bi-propellant fuel consisting of liquid propane and liquid oxygen.  Hardware issues were also discussed and our guests raised issues of how to get more awareness and visibility for their concept.  The last call came from Nels in London as we were about to end the show.  Nels wanted to know about the trades considered and used regarding the fuels and the propulsion systems our guests talked about during the program.  Both our guests left us with closing comments you will want to hear.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach our guests through the Microlaunchers website or through me. Learn more about Ed at http://home.earthlink.net/~apendragn/atg.

Stan Kennedy, Maureen O’Brien, Oakman Aerospace, Friday, 9-6-13 September 7, 2013

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Stan Kennedy, Maureen O’Brien, Oakman Aerospace, Friday, 9-6-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2082-BWB-2013-09-06.mp3

 

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Guests:  Stanley Kennedy, Jr., Maureen O’Brien.  Topics:  Oakman Aerospace, cubesats, ITAR reform.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Stan Kennedy and Maureen O’Brien to the program for this 58 minute discussion about Oakman Aerospace, cubesats, the Small Sat Conference, ITAR reform and more.  During one segment discussion, Stan took us through the brief history of Oakman Aerospace (www.oak-aero.com) which just completed its first fiscal year.  Oakman Aerospace (OAI) specializes in rapid and responsive, modular, open-architecture space systems which Stan discussed with us, plus more information is available on their website.  We talked about changes in the small satellite and cubesat industries, the effect of sequestration which may be driving companies to more commercial options, and financial options including crowd sourcing using Kickstarter.  Stan fielded several listener questions regarding the use of Kickstarter, the possibility of over saturation of the developing industry, the drive to push toward more commercial space ventures.  We also talked about the importance of international participation and ITAR Reform.  At one point, I asked about bottlenecks in this area and our guest cited the 1248 report.  Maureen discussed the current state of ITAR reform efforts and the impact of ITAR on the smaller companies.  One of the issues brought up in this discussion was the need to be able to retain foreign students and workers with a STEM background or experience so that we don’t lose them back to their home country or another country.  Later, a listener asked about student internships at OAI and we also learned that the company is hiring.  As our program was drawing to a close, I asked about the OAI year two plans and the company five year plan.  As you will hear, they are planning for growth and market share increases.  We talked about their IP being one of their main products & the need for standardization.  Charles Pooley called back in to over the costs required and the realistic time line for getting a secondary payload ride.  This discussion supports the need for lower launch costs and for additional small satellite and cubesat launch options.  Near the program’s end, our guest responded to an email question about the USML and CCL regarding ITAR.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can contact our guests through their website or me.

Michael Paul, Penn St. Lunar Lion, Monday, 3-25-13 March 26, 2013

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Michael Paul, Penn St. Lunar Lion, Monday, 3-25-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1980-BWB-2013-03-25.mp3

Guest:  Michael Paul.  Topics:  The Penn State Google Lunar X Prize entry, the Lunar Lion.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We welcomed Michael Paul to the program, the leader of the Penn State Google Lunar X Prize team, the Lunar Lion.  For more information, visit their team website, http://lunarlion.psu.edu.  Michael brings to the table his experience with NASA and the Applied Physics Lab at John Hopkins as he was the spacecraft systems engineer for the NASA Messenger mission.  During the first segment of our 95 minute program, Michael talked about the Lunar Lion project.  We discussed launch contracts and vehicles, secondary payloads, landing sites, hoppers as opposed to rovers, and what happens to the hardware at the end of the mission.  We talked about the Penn State students working on the project and listeners and I asked questions about his experiences on Messenger being applied to a GLXP project.  The listeners seemed to think this was a step or two down but listen to how Michael explained lessons learned and applications to the Lunar Lion project.  We also talked about funding for their project and that if they win, the money goes to Penn State to endow further space related research and students. We also had a treat in the first segment in that Michael’s 10 year old son was with him. We invited him to the program and it appears we may have a future space guru in the making!

In the second segment, we talked about space education and general audience space enthusiasm and awareness given Michael’s public talks.  He had some interesting comments and experiences to share with us.  We also talked about potential regulations adversely impacting their mission, sample returns, lunar activities and such.  Charles called to talk about up and downstream communications and the use of lasers.  Spacecraft quality control was another issue along with the development of commercial tools for a much broader application than the Penn State GLXP entry.  He also mentioned efficiency in spacecraft design and management but used the term, “a frugal approach.” He explained the difference between frugal and efficiency in terms of spacecraft design & management.  As our program ended, we talked about thermal protection, radiation hardening, film and space subjects and topics.  Our final topic was oversight and 3rd party eyes on their project for review & quality control.

Post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email our guest through the Lunar Lion website or derspace@thespaceshow.com.

Zac Manchester, Tuesday, 2-5-13 February 6, 2013

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Zac Manchester, Tuesday, 2-5-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1944-BWB-2013-02-05.mp3

Guest:  Zac Manchester.  Topics:  Zac’s KickSat project, cubesats, crowd-funding, & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

    We welcomed Zac Manchester to the program to discuss his KickSat CubeSat open source mission using 200 Sprite ChipSats.  You can learn more by visiting www.kicksat.net, www.spacecraftresearch.com and http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/251588730/kicksat-your-personal-spacecraft-in-space.  From these websites you can visit the KickSat wiki as well as the KickSat blog.  We started our discussion with Zac Manchester with his providing us with an overview of his KickSat project and Kickstarter as a tool to fund some types of space ventures.  Zac talked about launches being provided by the NASA Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (/ELaNa) program plus the lack of traditional financing which caused Zac to give Kickstarter a try.  The KickSat team started out wanting to raise $30,000 but instead raised nearly $75,000.  He had much to say throughout both segments regarding crowd-funding and the use of Kickstarter.  Zac also described the cubesats and the Sprite ChipSats.  He talked about the importance of reducing the size of the unit and what this meant for mission design, propulsion, technology advancement, lower launch costs, and more.  Several listeners emailed him questions including space debris questions since the 200 Sprite ChipSats would have a short life expectancy and then return to Earth.  He said all would burn up in the atmosphere but he also talked about future missions where the units would float back to Earth as would a piece of paper. Technology advancement for this to happen must take place but he said it was certainly plausible.  Other issues discussed in our first segment included secondary payments and payload integration.  Regarding payload integration, he said their project goes to Cal Poly for peapod integration and then to the Cape from Cal Poly for vehicle integration.  Cal Poly does the peapod integration for academic cubesat projects.  A listener saw the project plans on one of the websites and inquired about making the hardware or buying a kit from Zac’s group.  As you will hear, the project is open source and people are encouraged to buy the off the shelf parts and make their own unit.  Zac mentioned several online stores where the parts could be bought.  We talked about the difficulty in getting a launch for a stand alone cubesat someone might build.

     In the second segment, we took a call from Charles Pooley who talked about building a small launchers to get away from secondary payloads and potential launch delays we he said were the barriers to this industry. Check out www.microlaunchers.com for more on the Pooley idea. Zac then told us about the March 16 workshop at the Hacker Dojo in Silicon Valley on how to set up KickSat ground stations.  Zac described the ground station using Ham bands and suggested the cost would be around $200.00.  Another listener asked Zac for his background & how he got interested in space & a cubesat project.  Zac had much to say about the academic research that inspired him as both a Cornell undergrad and masters student.

      Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  You can contact Zac through his project websites and blog.

Robert (Bob) Zimmerman, Monday, 12-10-12 December 11, 2012

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Robert (Bob) Zimmerman, Monday, 12-10-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1911-BWB-2012-12-10.mp3

Guest:  Robert (Bob) Zimmerman.  Topics:  Apollo 8, launch industry, HSF, SLS, Mars missions, NASA budget, & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. We welcomed Bob Zimmerman back to the program to summarize space for 2012, to look forward to space activities in 2013, and as you will hear, to talk about some specific issues such as SLS and the need for heavy lift.  Bob started the discussion talking about Apollo 8 as we approach Christmas 2012.  He told us his famous book, “Genesis: The Story of Apollo 8: The First Manned Mission to Another World” has been released in ebook format. If you buy it on Amazon using the URL provided, Amazon will make a donation to The Space Show/OGL: www.amazon.com/Genesis-Apollo-Mission-Another-ebook/dp/B00A1EZJ6U/ref=onegiantlea20. Bob outlined two tracks for discussion, the launch industry and manned spaceflight exploration.  For the launch industry, he talked about the influence of SpaceX in lowering launch costs & what it means for other launchers in competing in pricing & market share.  He also talked about negotiation issues over the continued use of the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. We discussed secondary payloads, Stratolaunch, & more.  The second track involving manned space exploration, Bob talked about it from the government perspective & that of the private sector.  He also brought up the recent news regarding the new Golden Spike venture on which he had much to say.  Our first caller was from Terry asking about the NASA Mars program, James Webb & SLS.  Bob had much to say about the JWST as well as SLS, NASA astrophysics, & SLS costs.  Terry wanted to know when Bob thought SLS would be cancelled. This discussion prompted more than a passionate exchange by Bob and me regarding heavy lift, rocket mission analysis, & more.  We then paused for our overdue break.
     Leading off the second segment, we took a call from Doug in S. California but had audio issues on his phone line. We then talked about the SpaceX mission delay to March 2013.  Tim called to talk about launch rate regardless of the size of the vehicle.  He also talked about Golden Spike & a potential space tug.  He asked Bob about Skylon.  We switched topics to get updates from Bob regarding the suborbital companies. Bob talked about Virgin Galactic & powered flight tests.  He also had some things to say about Dream Chaser and XCOR.  I asked Bob about using drones on Mars based on comments I’ve received from listeners.  Near the end, I brought up a special film showing & lecture on the 1956 classic “Forbidden Planet” that I saw this past Saturday. We talked about the significance of this movie & Bob brought in the concept of human spirit, vision, & the desire for interplanetary travel even before the days of NASA or Sputnik.  I talked about the two award winning speakers from Lucas Film regarding the movie & then the surprise visit after the film by Robby the Robot, the original Robby from the film. To end our program, Bob gave us an outline of what to look for in the first quarter of 2013 for space events.
     Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  Check out Bob’s blog, http://behindtheblack.com.

Jason Andrews, Monday, 11-5-12 November 6, 2012

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Jason Andrews, Monday, 11-5-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1888-BWB-2012-11-05.mp3

Guest:  Jason Andrews.  Topics:  Cubesat, Nanosat integration, launch services, Andrew Space, Spaceflight & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. We welcomed back Jason Andrews to update us on both Andrews Space and Spaceflight.  You can follow along on the respective websites, http://andrews-space.com & www.spaceflightservices.com Jason was with us for one hour to discuss cubesat and nanosat payload integration, the services offered by Andrews Space and Spaceflight for small satellite launchers and related issues.  Spaceflight does publish their price list on their website and we did talk about their pricing.  Check it out at http://spaceflightservices.com/pricing-plans. We discussed market and financing conditions, the use of international launchers, integrating international payloads, ITAR, U.S. launchers and the possibility of using either Chinese or Indian launchers.  Jason went through their turnkey services offered with Spaceflight, then we talked about hardware and the integration of Andrews Space with Spaceflight.  Listeners asked lots of questions, including one about a sustainable lunar colony.  Other questions addressed the status of a secondary payload and general ride sharing terms, primary payload obligations and considerations, and the potential need for a dedicated small launcher.  Insurance was also talked about and included issues concerning self-insurance to buying insurance in the marketplace.  Many with payloads less than $1 million do opt for being self-insured.  Another issue talked about concerned secondary payload compatibility with the primary payload and the required safety audit for the secondary payload.  In talking about Andrews Space, Jason told us about the SHERPA Space Tug and the larger spacecraft using the ESPA Ring which closes the gap between a 3 kilo and 180 gram spacecraft. As our discussion with Jason ended, he talked about hiring opportunities for both companies and the availability of internships.
     In our brief second segment, I went over The Space Show schedule this week as programming has been cancelled for Tuesday due to wanting to watch election results and on Friday due to my probable jury duty.  I urge you to check the website newsletter Wednesday evening and then again Thursday evening because if my jury duty is cancelled, I will call up the scheduled Friday program and you will find out about it via the website newsletter.
     Please post your comments/questions for Jason Andrews on The Space Show blog.

The John Batchelor Show “Hotel Mars,” Wednesday, 10-10-12 October 11, 2012

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The John Batchelor Show “Hotel Mars,” Wednesday, 10-10-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1870-BWB-2012-10-10.mp3

Guests: John Batchelor, Dr. David Livingston:  Topics:  SpaceX Falcon 9 launch of Dragon to resupply ISS.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Written transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. This program is archived on The Space Show website, podcasting, and blog sites with permission from John Batchelor. Please visit the John Batchelor Show website for more information about this fine program, www.johnbatchelorshow.com. During our 11.5 minute discussion, John and I discussed the Oct. 7, 2012 Falcon 9 launch of the Dragon to resupply the ISS.  There was also a secondary payload onboard, a commercial B2B Orbcomm satellite that did not reach its proper orbit. We discussed the launch, the loss of power for Engine 1, why the second stage was not restarted, the successful birthing of Dragon to the ISS, and more.  We talked about what the success of this resupply mission to the ISS means and what might be some of the concerns regarding the secondary payload issues.
     Please post any comments/questions you might have about this discussion on The Space Show blog.  If you want to contact John Batchelor about this program, please do so through me.

Dr. Perry Ballard, Friday, 1-13-12 January 13, 2012

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Dr. Perry Ballard, Friday, 1-13-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1689-BWB-2012-01-13.mp3

 Guest:  Dr. Perry Ballard.  Topics:  Space Test Program, Secondary payload capacity and more.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed Dr. Perry Ballard, Chief Engineer, DOD Manned Spaceflight Payloads Office, Space and Missile Systems Center, JSC.  Dr. Ballard began our discussion with an overview of the DoD Space Test Program (STP), why it was created, its purpose, and some of the experiments that have flown with great success because of STP efforts.  Dr. Ballard also spoke about the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) imaging spectrometer mission which with the help of STP flew on the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) on the ISS.  Dr. Ballard responded to listener questions about the impact on STP of budget cuts as well as payload capacity downgrades due to the retirement of the shuttle.  You might be surprised by his response to these questions.  Another issue that was addressed was the NASA two year integration period for ISS missions.  Lots of questions came in about this, most wondering if a private company such as Bigelow could substantially reduce the two year period.  This prompted a more thorough discussion about integration and each rocket’s environment as well as the way it rides.  Professor Fevig from UND Space Studies asked about opportunities for student-built spacecraft to be launched as a secondary payload into GTO.  Launching to GTO, specifically cubesats, also turned into a significant discussion that you will not want to miss. At the end of this segment, Perry received some questions about assisting with payloads for sounding rockets.  In his response, he said they also work with balloon launches and sometimes even with high altitude aircraft. 

In our second segment, we talked about secondary payload capacity and the need for the payloads to be ready when the capacity is ready.  If the payloads are not ready, the capacity can go elsewhere.  This is quite a challenge for the university and cubesat community.  When you listen to what Dr. Ballard had to say about this issue, some of the challenges, the relationships with payloads, integration, timing, missions, and orbital dynamics, will become much clearer.  Later in this segment, Perry was asked about STP using foreign launchers and also finding rides for foreign payloads. 

In our final segment, we talked about the work of his office with the amateur satellite network, the challenges to provide ground stations for schools, and to increase broadband capacity.  He talked about the mission priority list he gets that he has to work with and the priorities for science missions above all else. Later in this segment, he put forth his own idea of getting sponsors, Space Grant, and others to supply rocket motors to student groups, classes, organizations, to help inspire students by actually doing things rather than just hearing a lecture or reading a book.  See what you think of his idea and run with it if you like it.  His idea is centered around getting students to build spacecraft, to bend metal so to speak.  Since the rocket motor may be the most expensive part needed, if it can be furnished by a sponsor, he believes it can be a driver for STEM education at different grade levels through college.  If you have comments or questions for Dr. Perry Ballard, please post them on The Space Show blog URL above.  Any notes you have for Dr. Ballard can be sent through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

 

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