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Dr. Erik Seedhouse, Monday, 2-10-14 March 11, 2014

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Dr. Erik Seedhouse, Monday, 2-10-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2204-BWB-2014-03-10.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Erik Seedhouse.  Topics: Suborbital spaceflight & Erik’s new book, “Suborbital: Industry at the Edge of Space.”  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Erik Seedhouse back to the show for this 1 hour 28 minute discussion regarding suborbital space and Erik’s new book, “Suborbital: Industry at the Edge of Space.”  In the first segment, Erik started out by telling why he wrote the book and he gave us updates regarding the prominent suborbital space companies.  We talked about payload flights, science flights, academic flights and space tourism flights.  Dr. Seedhouse spoke to the need to lower the cost for the flights and the need to prepare for painful accidents.  Listeners asked him to describe the flight profile for SpaceShip2 and the training many of the passengers had taken at the NASTAR Center.  Erik then spoke about competing centers, the American Astronautic Institute in Florida and Waypoint 2 Space which is adjacent to NASA JSC.  Questions came up about Astronauts4Hire and & the need to self market to get a flight.  Erik talked about floating free during the microgravity part of the flight on Virgin, addressing the issue of getting back to your seat on time before reentry.   Near the end of the segment, a listener asked why it was taking so long for suborbital flight we it was done decades ago and the information is in the public domain.  Ham the Chimp got mentioned in this section.  As the segment was closing, the new topic of space motion sickness came up.

In the second segment, a listener wanted to know if it mattered to the passenger re medical issues if vertical launch was used or horizontal launch was used.  Erik said the g force was the biggest medical problem with suborbital space.  He also talked about long arm centrifuge training, then he went over the Anti-G Straining Maneuver to deal with g force issues.  Space suits came, space tourist physical conditioning was discussion topic as was space radiation which Erik said was not a problem for suborbital flights.

Please post your comments on The Space Show blog above. Erik can be contacted at DrEricSeedhouse@hotmail.com.  Erik’s website is www.suborbitaltraining.com.

Dr. Tom Matula, Friday, 2-7-14 February 7, 2014

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Dr. Tom Matula, Friday, 2-7-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2182-BWB-2014-02-07.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Tom Matula.  Topics:  Space settlements known as astrosettlements, commercial space development.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Dr. Tom Matula back to The Space Show for a 1 hour 46 minute discussion about Tom’s concept for space settlements known as astrosettlements.  His Power Point presentation given at the ISDC 2013 has been uploaded to The Space Show blog for your review.  In the first segment of today’s program, I started out asking about one of Tom’s previous theories, the Space Development Bank.  From there, we jumped to astrosettlements which Tom believes will be market driven so we discussed some of the market factors that could drive these settlements.  Astrosettlements are orbital and would be designed for 500 to 1,000 inhabitants.  He listed three characteristics for the astrosettlements and we discussed each one.  The three included the need to be autonomous, mobile, and expandable.  Doug called from S. California to talk about and clarify market demand.  This led Tom to discuss the potential of the SpaceX Dragon Lab.  He also talked about suborbital with his understanding that the killer part of suborbital would not be space tourism but instead atmospheric research.  I asked Tom for timelines for the astrosettlements and he said 2-3 decades. This sparked further discussion.  When I asked for the starting point to develop the astrosettlements, Tom said we would need to develop virtual world models.  This resulted in a rather comprehensive discussion of modeling in the virtual world with Charles calling in to disagree across the board with our guest.

In the second segment, I read a lengthy email from Carl in San Antonio that deal the lunar development, the Moon Treaty, Common Heritage of Mankind and benefit sharing issues.  Don’t miss this discussion. Paul Turner both emailed in and called regarding how to profitably develop real estate in orbit, and why it is financially sustainable.  Paul has a book coming out on this topic so we will hear more about this later on.  More timeline questions came up regarding astrosettlements and the potential early market drivers which might include intellectual property, early materials manufacturing, and raw materials.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show Blog URL above.  Tom has a blog you should check out, www.wealthofspace.com.  You can reach Tom through me or his blog.

Dr. Matula’s ISDC 2013 presentation is here:  HALE ISDC

Interorbital Systems with the Millirons, Friday, 2-22-13 February 23, 2013

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Interorbital Systems with the Millirons, Friday, 2-22-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1956-BWB-2013-02-22.mp3

Guests:  Randa and Rod Milliron.  Topics:  Interorbital Systems engine tests, personal satellite kits, updates, rocket building R&D.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We welcomes Randa and Rod Milliron back for this 1 hour 36 minute discussion about their company, Interorbital Systems (IOS), rocket engine development and testing, and much more.  Visit their website at www.interorbital.com for more information and details of topics discussed today.  We started out by getting details about the IOS static engine test in Oct. 2012.  Our guests talked about the test and described their engine and the Neptune modular launch system.  Rod talked about using hypergolic propellants and why they chose to do so, plus our guests went over the capability of the Neptune rocket depending on how many modules and stages were used.  They also talked about adding a stage for the lunar lander as they are a GLXP participant.  We talked about the GLXP, getting secondary payload rides to the Moon or using a dedicated launcher such as the Neptune. Our guests described their plans for doing a sea launch and why, probably in the Pacific Ocean near Hawaii.  They also talked about having spaceport launching capabilities as well.  Listeners asked about demo flights and time lines, plus suborbital test flights.  Another listener asked about the plans for Olav Zipser to jump from a rocket in light of the Red Bull success.  Wes from Tampa emailed in about suborbital flights offering a space view for sensor testing, retrieving payloads, & testing low gravity manufacturing/3D printing.  IOS suborbital flights are their test flights.  Our guests had much to say about these matters, especially retrievable payloads.  Blair emailed in about IOS due diligence, their launch track record, and their consumer sales.  We then talked about the IOS personal satellite TubeSat and CubeSat kits. Wes called in to talk about his positive experiences given he has purchased one of the kits.  I also asked Wes about his due diligence on IOS before buying the kit.  Listen to how our guests and Wes responded to this line of questioning.

In the second segment, I asked about engine test regulations & required permits for testing at Mojave.  Randa and Rod mentioned complying with ITAR because they have foreign sales of the personal satellite kits.  They also talked about a 4H group on the Utah Colorado border building a personal satellite and the educational outreach this involves with the Ute Native Americans and others.  The Millirons were asked about their being considered fringe by some in the space community.  Note what they said about this and about attending space conferences.  A question came in as to why they were not using a hybrid engine.  Rod had lots to say about hybrids, don’t miss his comments.  Our discussion concluded with a summary of their forthcoming rocket plans and development program.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can reach our guests through their website or through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Dr. Alan Stern, Tuesday, 2-7-12 February 8, 2012

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Dr. Alan Stern, Tuesday, 2-7-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1710-BWB-2012-02-07.mp3

Guest:  Dr. Alan Stern.  Topics:  The upcoming Next Generation Suborbital Researchers Conference 2012 followed by a New Horizons and Pluto update.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed back Dr. Alan Stern for this special one hour program to discuss the upcoming Next Generation Suborbital Researchers Conference to take place in Palo Alto, CA from Feb. 27-29, 2012.  Note that registration rates increase after Feb. 10th so for those of you interested in attending, you should register before the cut off date if possible. To find out more about this conference and suborbital scientific research, visit http://nsrc.swri.org.  During the first half of the program, Dr. Stern told us about the conference and fielded many questions about suborbital flight and science research.  Not only did we go through the keynote speakers, the conference format, and the possibility of winning a ride on an XCOR Lynx once you register, we talked about the NASA Flight Opportunities Program (https://flightopportunities.nasa.gov), foreign interest in suborbital spaceflight and research, international spaceports, and the leasing of the vehicles much as is done in the airline industry.  In the last half of the program, we talked about the New Horizons Pluto mission as Alan is the P.I. for the mission.  As you will hear, the spacecraft is doing well and on its way to Pluto.  Alan was asked about the actual New Horizons Pluto mission and then what happens to the spacecraft after the Pluto mission is finished.  He said it would continue on into deep space, leave our solar system and become an interstellar mission much in the way of Voyager.  He also said it had power on board for perhaps 25-30 more years and that it would study objects in the Kuiper Belt which it would transit.  A listener asked him about the possible need to change course for New Horizons due to debris. Alan talked about this problem and the contingency plans to put New Horizons on a different approach to Pluto if necessary.  We also learned that the New Horizons team started a petition drive at Change.org to have the U.S. Post Office issue a Pluto stamp for the mission. I signed the petition, perhaps you will want to do so as well.  You can read about it on Alan Boyle’s Cosmic Log and he has a link in the article that will take you to the petition ;  http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/02/01/10284883-petition-pushes-for-a-pluto-stamp.  There were 4,000 signatures for the Pluto stamp at the time of my archiving this program.

If you have questions or comments about this program, please post them on The Space Show blog. If you need additional information on the conference, use the contact information from their website.

Dr. Perry Ballard, Friday, 1-13-12 January 13, 2012

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Dr. Perry Ballard, Friday, 1-13-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1689-BWB-2012-01-13.mp3

 Guest:  Dr. Perry Ballard.  Topics:  Space Test Program, Secondary payload capacity and more.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed Dr. Perry Ballard, Chief Engineer, DOD Manned Spaceflight Payloads Office, Space and Missile Systems Center, JSC.  Dr. Ballard began our discussion with an overview of the DoD Space Test Program (STP), why it was created, its purpose, and some of the experiments that have flown with great success because of STP efforts.  Dr. Ballard also spoke about the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) imaging spectrometer mission which with the help of STP flew on the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) on the ISS.  Dr. Ballard responded to listener questions about the impact on STP of budget cuts as well as payload capacity downgrades due to the retirement of the shuttle.  You might be surprised by his response to these questions.  Another issue that was addressed was the NASA two year integration period for ISS missions.  Lots of questions came in about this, most wondering if a private company such as Bigelow could substantially reduce the two year period.  This prompted a more thorough discussion about integration and each rocket’s environment as well as the way it rides.  Professor Fevig from UND Space Studies asked about opportunities for student-built spacecraft to be launched as a secondary payload into GTO.  Launching to GTO, specifically cubesats, also turned into a significant discussion that you will not want to miss. At the end of this segment, Perry received some questions about assisting with payloads for sounding rockets.  In his response, he said they also work with balloon launches and sometimes even with high altitude aircraft. 

In our second segment, we talked about secondary payload capacity and the need for the payloads to be ready when the capacity is ready.  If the payloads are not ready, the capacity can go elsewhere.  This is quite a challenge for the university and cubesat community.  When you listen to what Dr. Ballard had to say about this issue, some of the challenges, the relationships with payloads, integration, timing, missions, and orbital dynamics, will become much clearer.  Later in this segment, Perry was asked about STP using foreign launchers and also finding rides for foreign payloads. 

In our final segment, we talked about the work of his office with the amateur satellite network, the challenges to provide ground stations for schools, and to increase broadband capacity.  He talked about the mission priority list he gets that he has to work with and the priorities for science missions above all else. Later in this segment, he put forth his own idea of getting sponsors, Space Grant, and others to supply rocket motors to student groups, classes, organizations, to help inspire students by actually doing things rather than just hearing a lecture or reading a book.  See what you think of his idea and run with it if you like it.  His idea is centered around getting students to build spacecraft, to bend metal so to speak.  Since the rocket motor may be the most expensive part needed, if it can be furnished by a sponsor, he believes it can be a driver for STEM education at different grade levels through college.  If you have comments or questions for Dr. Perry Ballard, please post them on The Space Show blog URL above.  Any notes you have for Dr. Ballard can be sent through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

 

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