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Brian Altmeyer, Friday, 10-24-14 October 25, 2014

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Brian Altmeyer, Friday, 10-24-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2343-BWB-2014-10-24.mp3

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Guest:  Brian Altmeyer.  Topics:  We discussed the guest’s article posted on the Oct. 6, 2014 issues of The Space Review:  “The Strange Contagion Of a Dream.”  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Brian Altmeyer to the program to discuss his Oct. 6, 2014 Space Review article, “The Strange Contagion of a Dream: How Space Visionaries Hijack Governments to Change the World (see http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2611/1). During the first segment of our 1 hour 27 minute discussion, Mr. Altmeyer introduced us to the background behind writing this article, how he got the idea for it, plus he explained the overall impact space visionaries have had on him and his interest in space development.  Our guest took us back in time to the V2 program, Von Braun, and the politics of beating the Soviet Union to the Moon.  He made the case that both the Soviet Union’s and the US space program fed off each other in the form of competition to not only develop military space resources and ICBMs, plus our civil space programs as well.  I then asked our guest if he thought competition with China over their lunar and long range plans would result in a similar push for civil and commercial space.  His response was very interesting.  Ellen in Portland sent an email suggesting we did not have inspirational or effective leaders today like we had with Von Braun and others.  Brian disputed that and made reference to Elon Musk at SpaceX several times during our discussion.  Gerald Driggers called to talk about the impact of the International Geophysical Year on our early program.  Gerald worked in the early space program & had much to say about the main space personalities of the time along with the early rockets.  Our guest was asked about vision and Mars One, again he brought up SpaceX, and then he talked about exoplanets.  I asked him about the second to last paragraph in his paper regarding leadership issues and many waiting or expecting a new leader to come on the scene in a future election.  Don’t miss his comments on this issue.

In the second segment, Brian was asked about space budgets serving as a limiting factor & if SpaceX was carrying too much of the burden for our moving forward with space development.  Listeners asked him about sustainable space projects inspired & pushed by advocacy.  Do the projects continue or eventually die off?  Allison sent in a note asking our guest why we even needed HSF.  For his response, he cited reasons often provided by Elon Musk when he gets this question or one like it.  Near the end of the program, Ron emailed our guest to challenge his visionary outlook by asking if he had considered the reality of applying  human medical factors, engineering realities, orbital mechanics, & the known science for rockets & human spaceflight regarding the type of visionary statements made by Brian during the show.  This proved to be an interesting discussion as Brian said there were two ways to resolve such issues.  One way would be through testing and incremental progress to resolve or mitigate problems and the other way would be to just do the flight and sort of learn on the job, realizing there would be lots of casualties but at least we would be flying and learning.  I asked our guest if he was dismissing the known engineering &science including medical science.  He said he was not but clearly he preferred the second approach to problem solving. What do you think?

Please let us know by posting your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach our guest through me or the email address he provided at the end of his Space Review article.

Open Lines, Sunday, 8-25-13 August 26, 2013

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Open Lines, Sunday, 8-25-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2075-BWB-2013-08-25.mp3

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Guest:  Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  Mars missions, space advocacy, SLS & NASA lunar missions.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

Today’s Open Line show was in two segments over 2 hours and 23 minutes.  During the first segment, I put forth a few topics for discussion, including the NASA plan for returning to the Moon with two SLS launches over a year with the lander in orbit for about six months waiting for the second SLS flight.  This topic seemed to be the prevailing topic for the entire show covering both segments as listeners wanted to talk about SLS, Falcon Heavy, heavy lift and depots in general, and the announced NASA plan.  We also talked about the NASA asteroid missions as several listeners wanted to comment that they were less than enthusiastic about these missions.  Of course the majority of the listeners were critical of SLS and the return to the Moon mission.  Many wondered why such architecture, why so many years to build out the full heavy lift SLS, especially when looking back to what was accomplished with Apollo over half the time.

In the second segment, Tim called in to talk about Mars One and SLS.  Then Dr. Jurist called in questioning the SLS lunar mission, Congress, NASA, and the asteroid missions.  John had to much to say on these topics so don’t miss all of his comments.  We also talked about Mars One and pregnancy/child birth in space, on Mars, on the mission, and the moral and ethical issues surrounding  this issue.  Before John got off the line, he wanted to know why so many space advocates dismissed hard science in their chosen space plans and projects.  I attempted an answer but not sure it does justice to what I believe is a complex question with lots of subjectivity surrounding it.  See what you think and post your comments on our blog.  Near the end, Patrick called back about the space advocacy topic and talked about advocacy in an echo chamber but also what visionaries accomplish.  This was also an interesting discussion. We ended talking about successful, forward thinking, crowd funding space missions today and we had much to say in support of the entrepreneurs behind these projects.

Please post your comments and questions on The Space Show blog.  You can contact any of the callers by email through me.

 

 

Mark Bray, Monday, 12-17-12 December 18, 2012

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Mark Bray, Monday, 12-17-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1916-BWB-2012-12-17.mp3

Guest:  Mark Bray.  Topics:  Commercial space market development.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. We welcomed back Mark Bray to discuss the development of a commercial space market, the applications of Geoffrey Moore’s “Crossing The Chasm” theories, space policy and the challenges of transitioning the aerospace industry to a full commercial space industry.  Our first segment began with Mark explaining how he sees commercial space development in the context of the Geoffrey Moore book, “Crossing The Chasm.”  The main idea expressed in the book and by our guest focuses on businesses that are able to leap from the very early adopter period of a product to the broader based product acceptance in the consumer markets. Mark’s quick summary suggested we were not yet there with our developing commercial space industry. He talked about the existing commercial space segment, the idea that we cater to our own community rather than finding a need in the broader consumer markets, then supplying that need through commercial space development.  Until that happens, commercial space remain hindered. He also suggested that that space tourism would not be the business that crosses the chasm as he did not see it as being sustainable.  We talked about the ISS and its potential uses, NASA science missions, and the need to transition to an actual commercial industry which he does not believe exists today.  His focus during this discussion was market driven saying the lack of sustainable broad based commercial space market today is a problem. As the segment was ending, Doug emailed in to inquire about Dragon Lab and the possibility of NASA taking on more characteristics of the old NACA were in line with his perspective commercial space, markets, and broadening the consumer user base.  Mark had interesting comments about both and as we were going to break, suggested that the issues he was talking about dealt with how we get from where we are today to where we need to be to have a viable commercial space industry.

In our second segment, Todd emailed in questions about the impact of the U.S. and global economy on commercial space development.  Later, Mark was asked what it would take to have a profitable commercial space industry.  We talked about government subsidies in space, the Falcon 9, SpaceX, and ULA with the Atlas and Delta vehicles.  Mark then addressed the issue of needing to know the real costs involved for a product or a launch vehicle saying there should be at least 5-7 successful missions before the costs can be classified as known and understood.  Mark also addressed the difficulty with human spaceflight (HSF) and commercial space, then moved on to the boom in the cubesat sector which might actually end up being a product that does cross the chasm. Michael commented about mission insurance and Mark suggested that because of liability and insurance issues, we would not have a totally pure commercial space industry.  A listener asked him about the NewSpace industry and Mark talked about this in the context of NASA and industry innovation and early adopters.  Near the end of the program, Mark assessed the suborbital industry which is commercial but questioned the sustainability of the suborbital tourist market.  As the program was ending, I asked Mark for a Huntsville space status report.  He said things were stabilizing and it appears that worst of the layoffs and setbacks are now a thing of the past.  Fiscal cliff worries exist but the situation was not getting worse. He said many were expecting new and larger projects within 2-4 years.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email Mark Bray through me.

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