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OPEN LINES, Tuesday, 7-30-13 July 31, 2013

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OPEN LINES, Tuesday, 7-30-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2058-BWB-2013-07-30.mp3

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Guest:  Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  A variety of topics relating to space development & exploration. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

Our first segment of this 2 hour 14 minute Open Lines program started with a few of my suggested topics including a recent John Strickland Space Review article on SLS followed by a response from NASA which was published in the Huntsville Times as well as on NASA Watch.  More about this later as a caller read the two articles, then called to discuss them.  However, our first caller was Dr. Jurist who called to mention and congratulate the UND Space Studies Department for the award they received from NASA: The JSC Certificate of Appreciation for 25 years of outstanding leadership in the interdisciplinary leadership of space studies.  During John’s call, I read the exact wording on the certificate and since John and I are both adjunct professors at UND SpSt, we had much to say about the program, faculty, subjects, students, founders, etc.  It’s a fine program and it was an honor to let all of you know about this well deserved award and the UND Masters and PhD program in Space Studies.  Next up was our friend Dr. Bryan Laubscher to discuss this year’s upcoming Space Elevator Conference to be held August 23-25 at the Museum of Flight in Seattle, WA.  See http://www.isec.org/sec for more conference information, registration, the agenda, and logistics.  We talked about new developments with the space elevator, and Bryan told us about two other projects, plus he mentioned launch loop for which you can get more information at www.launchloop.com.  John in Ft. Worth called as he read the two articles on SLS and the NASA response that I mentioned at the first of our program.  His bottom line observation on SLS did not change as he believes it’s a placeholder for both the space workforce and technology until better days favor the space industry.  We had much to say about what John Strickland said in his July 15 TSR article and the NASA response by Dan Dumbacher per his July 29th article.  You don’t want to miss this discussion.

In the second longer segment, Tim was first up to talk about Rand Simberg and his theories that space is not important and more risk is needed, not more risk averseness. Tim made comparisons to settlers coming to the New World and I challenged him on it but his bottom line is that most likely most of the population will not be interested in space or space settlement and eventually when technology advances and prices are significantly lower, private companies will take the lead into space.  This of course only related to human spaceflight.  Our next caller was Mr. Microlaunchers himself, Charles Pooley.  Charles was again making the case for his approach to space through Microlaunchers (www.microlaunchers.com) when Dr. Jurist called in on the guest phone line to challenge Charles, especially about financing, time lines, ROI, etc.  John kept pushing Charles for how he intended to go from A to B.  It was a good discussion with John and Charles, one you will certainly want to hear.  John from Ft. Worth called back to talk about a possible rocket shape modeled on the Aquapod water bottle used by Ozarka Water Company. When I told listeners how to see it on the web, Charles emailed back saying the design would not work for a rocket. Oh well, back to drinking the water from it, I guess.  Our final call was from Jeff in Tucson who talked about his recent tour of Surrey Satellite when he was visiting in the UK.  This is an extensive description with very good and important observations.  Since Jeff has also visited SpaceX, we did some compare and contrast analysis between these two state of the art companies, one in the UK and one here in the states in S. California.  Also, you will want to take note of Jeff’s keen observations regarding Surrey and what makes it tick, including the cost free relationship it has with the Surrey University and its undergraduate as well as graduate students, many of which eventually come to work for Surrey Satellite.  Again, this is a very interesting discussion.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  If you want to email any of the callers, you can do so through drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Dr. James (Jim) Wertz, Sunday, 3-17-13 March 17, 2013

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Dr. James (Jim) Wertz, Sunday, 3-17-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1975-BWB-2013-03-17.mp3

Guest:  Dr. James (Jim) Wertz.  Topics:  Reducing space mission launch costs, changing space industry attitudes.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We welcomed back Dr. Jim Wertz, President of Microcosm, to continue our discussion on lowering total space mission costs.  For more information, visit the company website, www.smad.com/ie/ieframessr2.html.  Make sure you check out the Scorpius launch vehicle link on the website as this launcher could be a model for what Dr. Wertz talked about during the program.  In the first hour of our 100 minute program, Dr. Wertz identified sequestration and the government response to it as a big problem for the space industry, specifically the smaller companies and financially vulnerable projects.  Also, the fact that we are still on CR with the budget adds to the stress.  Despite the problems, Dr. Wertz did say throughout our discussion that it was possible for something good to come out of all of the problems in that we might actually start focusing on lowering total space mission costs. During much of the first hour, Dr. Wertz discussed the way the industry works, some of the challenges to lowering mission costs, and the need for lots and lots of attitudes to change to embrace the lower mission cost goals rather than the status quo or holding on to thinking that the rough times will pass and then we will be back to normal.  We talked about choke points in the strategy, the challenges, the hurdles.  I asked if NASA and Congress were the obstacles.  Dr. Wertz mostly said it was a collective attitude throughout the industry with all of us and all sectors that prevents the broad scale creation of the low cost mission environment.  He cited many examples, including a ten year spacecraft build out with a 15 year life such that when done, its 25 years behind the times.  He talked about advancing & new technology and the need to stay current, to keep replacing the old with the new.  We also talked about the value & economics of having hardware & component backups on a shelf ready to go when needed.  Reusability came up & I used Doug’s email as the poster question on the subject.  This turned into an detailed discussion about the both the upside and downside of reusability. As you will hear, economics don’t favor reusability unless there is a dramatically higher launch rate.  Dr. Jurist called in to talk about student projects & the need to launch them while the students are still in school. He also talked about this in the context of keeping young people interested in space.  He asked Jim for solutions and Jim suggested simpler designs. For example, pressure fed systems rather than using high speed turbo pumps with thousands of parts, plus the use of more composites, especially in the tanks.  Jim was asked about the minimum possible launcher size and he said about 100 kg or 220 lbs. to LEO.

In our shorter second segment, Dr. Wertz was asked about the commercial private ventures announced in 2012 and so far this year.  He though we were technically capable of doing most of them but that the track record for the private sector in reducing total space mission costs was not that much better than the public sector track record.  He went back to saying the main driver was attitude and that changing attitudes within the industry in the public and private sectors was key to reducing space mission costs.  He cited yet another example, this time the idea to use AMSAT for space communications.  Dr. Wertz added that we need to convey urgency to the policy makers in getting them to change their attitude as other nations are moving forward with space and in many ways we are in retreat.  Claudia in Memphis sent in a note asking if classes were taught in aerospace engineering programs on how to change attitudes within the industry.  Dr. Wertz liked the idea but was not aware of classes of that kind.  As the program was ending, he talked about how and who to influence and used the Rachel Carson environmental book “Silent Spring” as an example.  He concluded the discussion by mentioning the Reinventing Space Conference in Los Angeles, Oct. 13-17 (see www.responsivespace.com). He repeated his hope for a positive outcome from sequestration which would be a renewed focus on the need to actually develop systems & the environment to enable reduction of space mission costs, including launch costs.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email Dr. Wertz at jwertz@smad.com.

Dr. James (Jim) Wertz, Monday, 2-11-13 February 12, 2013

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Dr. James (Jim) Wertz, Monday, 2-11-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1948-BWB-2013-02-11.mp3

Guest:  Dr. James (Jim) Wertz:  Topics:  Methods for dramatically reducing space mission costs, schedules, & launches.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

     We welcomed Dr. Jim Wertz, President of Microcosm, back to the show to discuss various methods & tools for reducing total space mission costs.  Our guest talked about successful programs and tools that have so far contributed to total mission cost reduction.  In the first segment of our 1 hour 33 minute program, Dr. Wertz started by defining what he meant by reinventing space.  He said this refers to a dramatic reduction in total space mission costs by a factor of 2::10 for schedule related reductions and 2-5 times for space access related costs.  Early on he was asked about reducing costs by increasing the launch rate, a common argument heard in various sectors of the space industry.  His response might surprise you.  Dr. Wertz cited examples to support his comments, specifically Surrey Satellite in the UK (SSTL) as they have been reducing costs successfully for 25 years.  He said modern technology must be used. He also pointed us to his Reinventing Space Project with the USC Astronautics Department.  Also, he pointed us to these websites for more information, www.smad.com/ie/ieframessr2.html and www.smad.com/ReinventingSpace.html.  Dr. Wertz mentioned disaggregation regarding the military using smaller spacecraft and different orbits.  He was asked about cubesats and cubesat launchers, the Scorpius launch vehicle, and NanoEye.  Jim offered sequestration and budgetary comments and pointed out the difficulty in mission planning and more when the nation continues to operate on CR rather than a budget.  He talked about the potential seriousness of the sequestration cuts.  In response to questions about the private sector and SAA type agreements, he pointed out that they exclude the smaller, more creative and innovative cutting edge companies as they are often unable to contribute the required financial portion of the agreement.  Jim pointed out that the goal was to reduce total mission costs, not just launch costs. He said that the launch cost was not always the most costly component of the mission.  As the segment ended, he talked about emergency response and the need for a rapid response, something that is today unavailable.

    In the second segment, we talked about the Cassini Resource Exchange as an effective policy that reduced mission costs and enabled an on time project.  Don’t miss the details about this program.  He again talked about SSTL and pointed out that their attitude is what makes them special & so good.  SSTL has pride in reducing mission costs. We don’t have such pride.  Dr. Wertz talked about Trading on Requirements and why it is risky.  During the first segment, fuel depots were offered up as a possible way to reduce mission costs but Dr. Wertz put them in the marginal category. During this segment, listeners had lots of questions about fuel depots.  In fact, it was as if they cared more about their vision and beliefs regarding fuel depots than the overall message Dr. Wertz was putting out. Clearly fuel depots have the attention of space enthusiasts & sectors of the industry no matter what.  A listener also asked about advanced propulsion concepts as represented by several companies pushing very advanced designs.  Dr. Wertz mentioned that the amateur satellite network could be used to reduce mission costs and talked about the success of AMSAT.  More listener questions came in regarding fuel depots, by far the most common discussion and question topic of the day.  Jim talked about future programs that may offer economies of scale such as SSP.  The last questions came in from Tim regarding our discussion of using pressure fed systems over the use of systems with a turbo pump.  He also wanted to know about rocket reusability.  Jim’s answers may again surprise you.

     Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  You can email Dr. Wertz through me using drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Jim Keravala, Shackleton Energy Co., Friday, 12-14-12 December 15, 2012

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Jim Keravala, Shackleton Energy Co., Friday, 12-14-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1914-BWB-2012-12-14.mp3

Guest:  Jim Keravala.  Topics:  Shackleton Energy’s cislunar economic development plans.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. We welcomed Jim Keravala to the program to talk with us about the Cislunar development plans for Shackleton Energy.  To learn more, visit their website at www.shackletonenergy.com. Jim started our discussion with an overview of Shackleton Energy and their Cislunar development plan.  As you will hear throughout our discussion, the plan involves the propellant depots near the ISS and in other locations, water ice development at the lunar north and south pole, the use of insitu resources and eventually Shackleton industrial astronauts.  Our guest spent most of the first segment describing the plan, the various stages of development, the use of robotic technology leading up to human spaceflight and benefit sharing ideas.  He talked about being able to solve or at least significantly contribute to solutions to our global energy usage problems which he said would be around 30 terawatt hours(TWh).  He talked about the viability of SSP at that point based on the cislunar Shackleton Energy development program. Jim also mentioned the risk of reaching the Kessler limits regarding space debris.  Ben sent in an email asking Jim for his thoughts on benefit sharing, a subject put forth on The Space Show by recent guest Dr. Edythe Weeks.  Jim was supportive of benefit sharing through technology exchanges and transfers as well as in helping under developed nations build an industry to allow them to compete and have a presence in the expanding space industry.  He cited his work with Surrey Satellite Company and their African space development program as an example, plus he talked about sharing to make sure everyone benefitted from space development which could significantly improve life in these countries.  We talked about government corruption problems and ITAR as issues that might get in the way of benefit sharing, but Jim was steadfast in the need to reach out to third world countries to engage them in space development for the commercial and industrial benefits.
     In our second segment, Doug called to ask about transitioning from telerobotic missions to human missions.  Here, Jim did a comprehensive explanation of the different phases of their development plan leading up to industrial astronauts in cislunar space. He talked about trades with humans based at EML1 as compared to the lunar surface regarding repair and maintenance missions of lunar surface hardware.  Charles wanted to know about their choice of launch vehicles.  Jim also got questions about their timeline and capital acquisition plans.  Randy wanted to know if they would be able to meet the 2020 timeline referenced in their website video.  Near the end, Jim got questions about the requirements for becoming an industrial astronaut.  In summary, Jim talked about their ambitious project, TRLs, and the importance of the project from many different perspectives.
      Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog. If you want to email Jim Keravala, you can do so through me.

Reinventing Space Conference 2012, Tuesday, 5-8-12 May 9, 2012

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Reinventing Space Conference 2012, Tuesday, 5-8-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1770-BWB-2012-05-08.mp3

Guests:  Open Mic at the Reinventing Space Conference 2012.  Topics:  Responsive space, low cost space access, Army satellite program, university projects, students & education, Dream Chaser, Women in Aerospace Southern California Chapter.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  This Space Show program was an “open mic” discussion for those attending the Reinventing Space Conference 2012.  The Space Show made its microphones available to those in attendance to speak on any topic of interest to them.  Our discussion topics included responsive space, low cost space access, pushing technology, the U.S. Army satellite program and the launch of the Army’s SMDC-One satellite, the first Army satellite launch in 50 years.  Others spoke about university projects, STEM education, the lack of interest in space /STEM subjects by among the younger population, challenges in the field of education, and the Women In Aerospace Southern California Chapter.  We started out with Dr. Jim Wertz providing us with an overview of the responsive space issues and what we can expect in the coming years.  George Vamos, Dr. Wertz & as Dr. Van Allen discussed offsets and technology trades in lowering launch costs.  Other participants talked about progress they have seen and experienced over their many years of working in the aerospace field.  We heard from Charles Kilmer on this subject.  He was followed by John London of the Army SMDC/ARSTRAT.  He talked about the first Army satellite launch in 50 years, the SMDC-One.  We also learned about future plans for Army satellites in support of the warfighter.  He  talked about the Army launching satellites the size of a loaf of bread and a bread box at 1/2000th the cost of a more traditional satellite.  Rachel and Krystal from Sierra Nevada spoke about Dream Chaser.  We learned more about their upcoming vehicle testing schedule as well as new agreements with Florida.  I also inquired about Dream Chaser for space tourism which as you will hear will follow their priority which is commercial crew to the ISS.  Larry Martin talked about his University of Hawaii project but we also had a participant from the University of N. Dakota and a recent graduate from Georgia Tech. I apologize for not getting their names for this program summary.  These students talked about the challenges in getting younger students interested and aware of space.  Our final participants represented Women In Aerospace and the Southern California Chapter.  Jeanne Innis Olson and Nicole Johnson spoke about the organization & their California chapter.  Those interested in learning more about the organization should contact Wendy Williams at wendy.williams@atk.com.

Please post your comments/questions regarding this program Space Show blog.  I have listed participant bios for those that have a bio on file with The Space Show.

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