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Anthony Young, Sunday, 9-20-15 September 21, 2015

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Anthony Young, Sunday, 9-20-15

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Guest: Anthony Young. Topics: “Anthony’s book “The Twenty-First Century Commercial Space Imperative” & the emerging commercial space industry. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back Anthony Young to discuss his new book, “The Twenty-First Century Commercial Space Imperative.” During the first segment of our 92 minute discussion, Anthony talked about writing the book as part of the Springer Briefs In Space Development Series. He talked about commercial space emerging into a huge venue, then he outlined the format of his book which is for the most part the book’s Table of Contents (check out the book’s Amazon page to read the Table of Contents). You can follow along with us as our guest discusses the major topics and themes based on the Table of Contents. During this segment, I sked Anthony why he thought commercial space was the twenty-first century imperative. Don’t miss his response to my question. Other topics discussed in this segment included entrepreneurism, start-ups, even NASA projects. In chapter 2, Anthony talked about game changers in the industry. Here, he specifically cited SpaceX and Stratolaunch. Later, he included the developing cubesat industry and then in a later chapter, he cited the personal spaceflight industry. Anthony talked about reaching students and addressing the issues surrounding STEM, plus he talked about what was happening with private space outside the United States.

In the second segment, we talked about the upcoming movie, “The Martian” and the fact that it addresses a government mission and has nothing to do with commercial or private space. Anthony cited a recent headline he had seen saying the movie would do nothing to advance commercial space. Returning to the Moon came up next as did international projects which he said were a significant contributor to global peace. Near the end of the segment, a listener asked about the impact of the SpaceShip 2 accident and our guest talked about the NTSB findings. Despite the accident, he said their was significant potential for growth in the personal spaceflight segment of the industry, both for suborbital as well as for orbital flight. Anthony was asked about both the role and risk of government regulation in the emerging commercial space industry. As we were nearing the end of the program, I asked him for his thoughts on what the industry would look like ten years from now. Before our discussion ended, Anthony said he was working on a another book regarding the Apollo lunar samples.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog per above. Anthony’s website is http://personalspaceflightadvisors.com.

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John Powell, Tuesday, 10-2-12 October 3, 2012

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John Powell, Tuesday, 10-2-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1864-BWB-2012-10-02.mp3

Guest:  John Powell.  Topics:  JP Aerospace updates re PongSats, Airship to orbit, orbital physics for a balloon.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. Please visit the JP Aerospace website to follow along with us and for more information:  www.jpaerospace.com. We welcomed back John Powell for updates regarding JP Aerospace.  John started off with information about his recently concluded six high altitude balloon flights. He also talked about advertising programs, TV commercials, and his successfully completed Kickstarter program.  Other programs mentioned in this segment included the new JP MiniCubes and information about his Airship to Orbit (ATO) program.  Listeners asked John about the package of information they received after a flight, plus his plans to 140,000 feet and then from 140,000 feet to orbit. He talked about the Ascender and even registered a listener for an upcoming PongSat flight.
     In our second segment, John told about his remaining 2012 flights, their flight expectations for 2013, plus I asked him about the costs involved for a typical weather balloon mission to 100,000 feet.  John fielded several additional listener questions including several and one phone call from Trent in Australia.  John responded to questions about his volunteer workforce and we learned that there were no aerospace engineers working with JP.  Listeners asked him about his timeline to orbit which he said was around ten years.  As the program was close to ending at the two hour mark, Charles Pooley called in about being skeptical that an airship can muster the energy needed to go to orbit.  This was a good and passionate discussion between Charles and John.  Charles kept saying he put his trust in Mother Nature (the laws of physics) and John said that it was a challenge but was optimistic that they would figure out a way to do it, especially since they would be air launched. Part of the discussion focused on the very early Echo test flights.  You can read about the Echo flights which used a rocket at http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4308/ch6.htm. See what you think and let us know on the blog.
     If you have comments/questions please post them on The Space Show blog.  You can email John through me or his website.

Reinventing Space Conference Interviews, Friday, 5-11-12 May 11, 2012

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Reinventing Space Conference Interviews, Friday, 5-11-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1772-BWB-2012-05-11.mp3

Guests:  1st Segment: Col (Res.) Yoram Ilan-Lipovsky with George Vamos;  2nd Segment: George Vamos.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  This program consists of two recorded interviews from the Reinventing Space Conference 2012.  The first interview for an hour is with Col (Res.) Yoram Ilan-Lipovsky .  Yoram has been interviewed in earlier years at this conference, still serves with the IAF though he is retired,  and is still part of the Israeli Space Program.  We were joined by George Vamos who was attending the conference as he was most interested in Yoram’s plans for air launch for Israeli satellites and missions.  Col. Ilan-Lipovsky told us about his plan to use cubesats for disaster management including wild fires as well as a host of other natural and man made disasters.  He talked about the interest in this project in Japan, the U.S. including the states most subject to wild fires, Europe and Israel.  We went through his satellite plan, the use of air launch to quickly get the satellites up for a specific disaster, and debris issues when the small satellites reach the end of their mission.  Later in this interview, we talked about space and the average Israeli, the Kepler Space Telescope and STEM issues in education in Israel and around the world.

In the second segment, George Vamos proposed several questions to us and hopes that listeners to this program will offer him comments, information, or ask questions on the blog.  George is looking ahead to the day when he believes there might be a government space program leaving all space exploration, including deep space exploration, to the private sector.  Thus, he is looking at a new model to finance deep space missions using philanthropy.  He is wondering what the price points might be for deep space mission, perhaps to Mars, and then can such a mission be financed through philanthropy.  He said he realized that most of these types of missions would not support a commercial model since traditional investment and ROI objectives would not likely be met.  Based on what he sees with wealthy people building wings of hospitals, cancer centers and even financing the Keck Telescope in Hawaii, he exploring philanthropy as a possible means of carrying, perhaps at a small level, meaningful deep space missions.  See what you think and let him know your thoughts on the blog.  He will be responding to your comments and questions.

For all comments and questions regarding both segments of this discussion, please post them on The Space Show blog.

Dr. James Dewar, Sunday, 2-12-12 February 12, 2012

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Dr. James Dewar, Sunday, 2-12-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1711-BWB-2012-02-12.mp3

NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKETS

Guest:  Dr. James (Jim) A. Dewar.  Topics:  Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR), changing paradigms to use the NTR from Earth launch, nuclear economics.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed Dr. Dewar back to The Space Show to further discuss the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) and his paradigm changing approach to use the NTR to launch from Earth rather than using it only in space.  During this nearly 2.5 hour discussion, Dr. Dewar makes the case for the NTR based on probable economics, the previous history associated with NERVA, and the assumed benefits flowing to private companies engaged in public private partnerships along the lines Dr. Dewar described.  In the first segment, Dr. Dewar started out describing the existing barriers to using the NTR to LEO rather than only in space, plus he referred us to his 29 page introductory paper which is available on The Space Show blog for your download and review.  During this segment, we fielded many listener emails and calls wanting to discuss the NTR ISP, possible fuels, testing, and legal issues impacting the use of the nuclear rocket. Michael called and talked about the discussions for a new treaty, the Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty (FMCT) and how that would adversely impact using the NTR.  Dr. Dewar talked about treaty issues over the years and suggested that treaties are not that easy to establish in this era while suggesting that they could also be modified.  Near the end of the first segment, questions about thorium came up as did questions about additional commercial uses for the nuclear engine here on Earth. 

In the second longer segment, we talked about winning over the public and the media.  Charles Pooley called in with a set of questions and we talked about reentry vehicles, highly enriched uranium, and more.  Jim described a Titan missile accident in Arkansas as an example of the safety controls even in a very large explosion.  Another listener asked about cooling and Jim told us about pulse cooling.  Dr. Dewar’s air launch idea was brought up again by another caller andMarshall sent in an email inquiring about the nuclear engine replacing coal in our terrestrial power plants to make electricity.  I asked Dr. Dewar about risk assessment for the nuclear rocket and reprocessing given terrorism, etc.  He said the reprocessed material would be carefully guarded but also weighed against the environmental risks associated with burying waste, burning it, or even dumping waste in the ocean.  Dr. Dewar was asked about using the nuclear rocket only in space rather than attempting to use it to launch from Earth.  He compared using it only in space to the Pony Express. Don’t miss his full response in replying to this question.  Later in this segment, I asked Jim for his first step in advancing the NTR.  He said the first step was to get people talking about the subject.  Tom called in and also wondered how to get people to rally to the cause.  Near the end of the program, Jim talked some more about potential economic benefits along with secondary commercial products such as heat pipes.  As our program was ending ion engines came up as did Vasimr.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  If you want to contact Dr. Dewar, send your note to me for forwarding.

To download and read Dr. Dewar’s paper, see below:

A Technical and Economic Introduction to Nuclear Rockets

A Technical Note on Nuclear Rockets-1

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Open Lines, Monday, 12-26-11 December 27, 2011

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Open Lines, Monday, 12-26-11

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1678-BWB-2011-12-26.mp3

Guest:  Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  Elon Musk New Scientist interview on his Mars plans, rocket development costs, policy issues.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  The Space Show/OGLF is now engaged in its annual fundraising drive. Please see & act upon our appeal at https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com/2011/11/21/space-show-2011-fundraising-campaign.  We welcomed the final 2011 Open Lines program.  During our two hour discussion with one break, I outlined discussion topics up front but as you will hear, one topic struck home. Listeners wanted to talk about the New Scientist interview with Elon Musk entitled “I’ll Put Millions of People on Mars, says Elon Musk.”  You can read the full interview on The Mars Society website, www.marssociety.org/home/press/news/illputmillionsofpeopleonmarssayselonmusk.  Callers honed in on the reported development costs for the Mars spaceship ranging from the $2-$5 billion.  Those that called the program thought this was inadequate funding.  At one point I looked up the development costs for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner which so far was estimated at $32 billion.  Since all of us thought a Mars spaceship was more complicated and involved in R&D than a new Boeing jetliner, listeners seemed to be more convinced that the projected costs were too low.  One listener brought up the costs of military projects such as the F22, the JSF, nuclear powered carriers and submarines, etc.  Another listener wanted to know if Space X was planning to open up additional launch sites to those that are publicly known.  In the second longer segment, not only did the military hardware come up for cost comparisons, but John in Atlanta wanted to talk about the Space News Op-Ed by Christopher Kraft (http://spacenews.com/commentaries/111219-nasa-needs-wake-reality.html).  Mr. Kraft wrote about the need to internationalize projects and make use of publicly available international hardware rather than build the SLS.  Tim called in from Huntsville to talk about the Musk interview, the rocket development costs, and using space resources to lower the costs.  He even suggested Elon make use of the QuickLaunch idea to put lox/kerosene in orbit for refueling.  Dr. Jurist called in to talk about the human factors for a Mars mission and that they seem to be understated by the Mars advocates.  Dr. Jurist speculated that it might take 5-10 years just to be able to address most of the human factor issues, not including what might be involved in implementing solutions.  We then talked about Stratolaunch and air launch.  We talked about the small payload capacity of the proposed vehicle and the need for multiple flight depending on the mission and the needed total payload.  Our next topic was yet another Soyuz failure and what this might mean for the ISS if the Soyuz problems are not fixed.  Terry called in again from Corpus Christi to talk about the Falcon 9 & Dragon flight in early February and how the success of the flight might become a driver for more commercial crew funding from the government.  With Dr. Jurist, we also explored the idea of inviting a certain UC Davis aerospace engineering professor to the program to discuss horizontal versus vertical launch and reusability.  I concluded this program with my own wish list for more civility within our space advocacy family and for real leadership with responsibility and accountability to emerge at all levels in Washington, DC, not just for space, but for the future of our nation.  If you have comments or questions, post them on The Space Show blog URL above.

Robert (Bob) Zimmerman, Wednesday, 12-21-11 December 22, 2011

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Robert (Bob) Zimmerman, Wednesday, 12-21-11

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1676-BWB-2011-12-21.mp3

Guest:  Robert (Bob) Zimmerman.  Topics:  Space Act Agreement, private compared to government space, Kepler planet discovery, bats.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. The Space Show/OGLF is now engaged in its annual fundraising drive. Please see & act upon our appeal at https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com/2011/11/21/space-show-2011-fundraising-campaign.  Merry Christmas to all of you from The Space Show.  We welcomed Bob Zimmerman back to the show for policy, news, and bat updates.  Make sure you visit his blog for interesting and timely news and posts, http://behindtheblack.com. We started our two hour discussion with Bob saying that NASA reverting back to using the SAA instead of the FAR was perhaps the most significant moment in space since the Apollo landings. Listen to his explanation which he talked about multiple times during the program. Do you agree?  In talking about the SAA, we also talked about the new NASA budget of $406 million for crew, including the amounts already allocated, leaving about $100 million less for the companies.  We talked about the need to have launch competition with at least two companies.  In addition, since NASA will “certify” the private HSF vehicles, we talked about what that might be like and the continued control over the companies by NASA.  As you will hear over and over again, Bob does not look favorably on government space programs and believes the future is to be found within the private sector.  Do you agree with Bob?  Another point Bob made in discussing the SAA was that it probably sounded the death knell for SLS.  Again, listen to what he had to say on this subject.  Kelly called in and sent us information about another effort to commercialize the remaining two space shuttles.  We talked about this and similar plans in detail.  The new Stratolaunch concept came up and Bob got a few questions about air launch and the performance gain from doing an air launch. Our discussion closed in the management team involved in the project as being a “dream team.”  In the second segment, we talked about the new Earth-like planet discoveries by the Kepler Space Telescope, including two in the habitable zone.  Later, we talked about human rating the Atlas and Delta rockets, and the DOD-ULA deal which may not happen.  Listeners asked Bob about the Russian space program in light of Phobos-Grunt, about SETI, and even possible one way missions to Mars.  Alistair asked about the possible impact on US policy makers if China was about to go to the Moon & establish a lunar base.  Later we talked about Telstar, ATT, airmail, and space politics..  We concluded with a bat update on White Nose Syndrome.  Bob suggested three areas to look for in 2012: the Falcon 9 launch, the test flight of Antares, and Virgin Galactic SS2 engine tests and flights.  Please post your comments and questions on The Space Show blog URL above.