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Jay Barbree, Monday, 7-28-14 July 29, 2014

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Jay Barbree, Monday, 7-28-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2288-BWB-2014-07-28.mp3

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Guest:  Jay Barbree.  Topics:  Neil Armstrong and Jay’s new book, “Neil Armstrong: A Life of Flight,” plus SLS, Orion, NASA Budgets and more.   Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back long time NBC space news reporter Jay Barbree to the show to discuss his new book, “Neil Armstrong: A Life of Flight.  Our program made use of the 60 minute format and one segment. We welcomed Jay to the show but as you will hear, there was a technical glitch as we started so you will hear the program being restarted.  No program time was lost.  Jay started by sharing with us the timeline he worked on for this book which spanned several decades.  He also set the stage by detailing his special relationship with Armstrong that made it possible for him to write this type of book.  He started Chapter 1 with the story of Neil ejecting from his fighter jet during the Korean War.  As you will hear, Neil was one of the early pilots ejecting from a jet fighter.  He flew into an anti-aircraft wire stretched between two mountains and it removed part of his plane.  He was unable to make it back to the Essex but he did manage to keep the plane in flight and when he ejected, he was over a Marine base.  Jay talked extensively about Neil seeing himself as a research test pilot and he referenced the old NACA plus his efforts that eventually paid off to get a test pilot assignment at Edwards AFB to fly at Dryden which has since been renamed after Neil Armstrong.  Jay talked about one X-15 flight where he overshot the landing.  The flight being described, the Pasadena Over flight, demonstrated Neil’s skills and expertise as a test pilot.  Jay talked about how Neil always wanted to go to space, plus his teaching career later in life.  A listener asked Jay about Neil and the Apollo 11 crew.  Jay had much to say on this subject, & why the specific Apollo 11 crew members were selected by Neil and Deke Slayton.  He also talked about the facts of Neil being the first to walk on the Moon, the conspiracy theory about their not being photos of Neil on the Moon because Buzz would not take any and much more.  Another listener wanted to know why Neil became far more public after the Columbia accident.  In his response to this question, Jay talked about Neil not liking the press and wanting to keep his privacy.  In the book, Jay Barbree referred to Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin as the misfits.  Don’t miss this great discussion.  Later, another listener wanted to know about Neil’s objections to cancelling the Constellation Return to The Moon program.  Jay went into some detail on this subject, including commenting on commercial space, SpaceX and more.  One thing he pointed out as did Neil and other astronauts was that what SpaceX and the new commercial industry was accomplishing, as outstanding as it was, is, and will be, was already done back in the day with our early space program, especially with Apollo.  As part of this discussion, Jay spoke about the SLS and NASA budgets, suggesting more money for NASA was not needed, but they needed to be more effective and efficient with how they spend their annual $18 billion plus.  He talked about consolidation, wastes at the centers and he told the LBJ story about the president’s insistence on locating Mission Control in Houston.  As our discussion was drawing to a close, Jay talked about Neil’s concept for incremental exploration which started out by going no further from Earth than three days with a 3 day return and no further out than a three second communication delay.  Once we mastered that, we go to the next goal and this way we incrementally explore space as we develop the ability to do so.  As the program ended and since Jay talked about getting old and his age throughout the show, I asked him if he planned to send his ashes to space upon his death.  Don’t miss his answer and our program’s conclusion.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can contact Jay Barbree through me.  Also, don’t forget to use the Amazon portal for OGLF/TSS so that Amazon will contribute to The Space Show.  Instructions are in all the archives including those on the blog, TSS website and the OGLF website.

Dragos Bratasanu, Friday, 3-7-14 March 8, 2014

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Dragos Bratasanu, Friday, 3-7-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2202-BWB-2014-03-07.mp3

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Guest:  Dragos Bratasanu.  Topics:  Failures in aerospace and aviation & how to avoid them.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back to the show Dragos Bratasanu to discuss his new ebook, “Engineering Success.”  Note that for a limited time, you can download this book for free from his website, www.successengineer.org.  In addition, he has given listeners Chapter One of his book which has been uploaded to The Space Show blog for this program.  During the first segment of this 94 minute discussion, Dragos started out by telling us why he wrote the book, what he wanted to accomplish with the book and the methodology he used in writing it.  He worked with several consultants and as you will hear, he cited numerous examples both in the space industry and outside the space industry to make his points about what he kept referring to as the social context of decision making, accountability, etc.  After providing us with the background to aviation and aerospace failures, he talked about remedies and modifications per the social context which I took to refer to the organizational culture though Dragos has a much broader definition which you will get during this interview.

In our second segment, he talked with us about scheduling and budget pressures that lead to failures and some of the recognizable danger signals.  He also provided us with some useful stats for speaking up from the employee ranks about problems and issues and why they often go unreported.  We talked about some additional specific corporate examples he used to make his point, plus we talked about the entrepreneurial space company culture.  Later, he went through the important four human needs followed by the four behaviors.  Our guest provided us with a good summary of his book and the subject.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can sign up for his free newsletter on his website and also for a limited time, download the ebook for free.  You can contact Dragos through his website or me.

 

Golden Oldie Tom Olson 2003 Year In Review, Monday, 12-23-13 December 23, 2013

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Golden Oldie Tom Olson 2003 Year In Review, Monday, 12-23-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2149-BWB-2013-12-23.mp3

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Guest:  Tom Olson.  Topics:  2003 annual review for commercial space, NASA, the private sector, Return to the Moon and more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

This program is the first in our Golden Oldie series looking as space development, commercial and private space, NewSpace and more over the past decade.  This archived Space Show program dates from Dec. 30, 2003 and features Tom Olson summarizing 2003 and looking forward to 2004.  Here is the summary I used for this program when it first aired Dec. 30, 2003.  We welcome Tom Olson, co-founder of The Colony Fund.  Tom returns to The Space Show for this 1 hour 16 minute discussion to update us on progress with The Colony Fund and to take a look at 2003 and 2004 from the commercial space perspective. Tom discussed the importance of the X-Prize, RLV and the suborbital industry, the regulatory issues which he believes will see great improvement for 2004. We talked about the aftermath of the Columbia accident and what any possible NASA reorganization might be like and what it means for space commerce and the private sector. Tom went out on the edge making several predictions for 2004, including a prediction about the current NASA Administrator! Mr. Olson also talked about returning to the Moon, going on to Mars, a new vision for space that is rumored to being prepared by President Bush and what such a potential vision will do for private enterprise. In this show, Tom Olson provided a superb conclusion to 2003 for The Space Show.

Please post comments/questions about this 2003 Golden Oldie year in review program.  You can email Tom through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

James Schier, Sunday, 8-5-12 August 5, 2012

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James Schier, Sunday, 8-5-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1829-BWB-2012-08-05.mp3

Guest: James Schier.  Topics:  U.S. space policy, NASA and human spaceflight goals, hardware, programs, and upcoming test flights, commercial space development. You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We welcomed NASA’s James Schier to the program to discuss the future of human spaceflight.  As the NASA Chief Architect and Planning Systems Manager plus a team member of the NASA Commercial Space Team, Mr. Schier spent two hours with us discussing our human spaceflight programs & future in detail.  In our first segment, we started back at the Columbia accident when a year later, it was announced that we needed a “bold new approach” to our HSF program.  Constellation was being developed, we changed administrations and then the Augustine Commission concluded that either NASA needed more funding to accomplish the program in place or it had to be stretched out if the budget remained the same or shrunk.  A flexible path was adopted and funding was left as is.  Our guest said there were three goals of the program including private sector development & participation in our HSF program, operating a fully developed & functioning ISS to 2020 and possibly beyond, & implementing a crew flyby of a NEO around 2025 with a humans to Mars mission around 2030.  This was the flexible path with a multi-program approach.  Our guest talked about the ISS becoming fully operational as an exciting national lab and he received several listener questions asking him why so many have said or written that our space program is at best in a state of confusion & at worst in a state of deterioration as we were not hearing anything like that with our guest.  Don’t miss this important discussion.  When Jim talked with us about SLS, he got similar listener questions that differed from what we were hearing about the program, the commitment to it, and its progress. Again, don’t miss what our guest had to say about the SLS program, its mission, capabilities, & the ongoing planning with the project.
In our second hour, we took a call from John about SLS as well as the program being more a congressional program rather than the President’s program.  SLS was compared to the cancelled Aries V, then we talked about the biggest risk to the program, ongoing congressional support & funding. Jim talked some more about Orion heat shield testing and reentry speeds, plus the upcoming heat shield test flight. Other Orion & SLS test flight programs were reviewed in this segment.  Listener Terry wanted to know if Orion could be flown on the Falcon 9 Heavy if SLS got cancelled.  Dr. Rowe called in to talk about specific cardiac stress issues for the returning astronauts. Mr. Schier then summarized many of the human spaceflight medical challenges facing us as we move out toward a lunar base, NEOs, and Mars. In this discussion, our guest did say that so far they were not seeing any show stoppers for extended long duration human spaceflight.  Near the end of our discussion, we talked about future missions under study, deep space habitat elements & large in-space transportation systems plus faster space travel with nuclear & possibly solar propulsion.  Standardized docking issues were mentioned along with international cooperation, citing the importance of the Russian support after the Columbia accident, highlighting the need for diverse crew space transportation.
Please post your comments/questions on the blog.  You can email Mr. Schier through me & I will forward your note to him.

Walter Cunningham, Tuesday, 6-19-12 June 20, 2012

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Walter Cunningham, Tuesday, 6-19-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1799-BWB-2012-06-19.mp3

Guest:  Walter Cunningham.  Topics:  An inside view of the American space program from Apollo to today.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, & discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, & any discussion must be relevant & applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed Walt Cunningham to discuss our space program from Apollo through today’s developing commercial space industry.  For more information, visit his website, www.waltercuningham.com.  You can buy “The All-American Boys: An Insider’s Look At The U.S. Space Program” from Amazon & they will make a contribution to The Space Show/OGLF if you use this URL: www.amazon.com/All-American-Boys-Walter-Cunningham/dp/1876963247/ref=onegiantlea20.  I started the discussion by asking Walt about his perspective on Apollo 7 today, 44 years later.  Walt had some interesting things to say about perspective, especially over the past 10-20 years as compared to when he actually carried out the mission.  A few times during our discussion, questions came up about the so called “mutiny” with the crew & NASA ground control so listen to how Walt described what was mostly a non-event despite media & blog reports to the contrary.  He did talk about Wally Schirra, his head cold & the Actifed commercials, but there was far more to the mission & to the significance of Apollo 7.  Dr. Jurist asked about the ride on a Saturn 1B, professors & experiences while both were at UCLA.  We discussed risk regarding his ride on the Saturn 1B. Walt had much to say about risk during the Apollo era as compared to now.  We extrapolated from this discussion to Columbia’s foam issues. We talked about commercial space.  Walt suggested that today’s commercial space efforts were not purely commercial given government funding & missions. He also said that retiring the shuttle when we did was a big mistake.  He then took us through a cost analysis process to illustrate that space is & always will be costly.  At the end of the first segment, one way trips to Mars & reality TV show funding were mentioned.

In the second segment, Terry called with questions about Von Braun. Walt had high praise & much to say about Von Braun & his experiences with him.  Commercial space came up again & I asked him about asteroid mining.  He did not think it would be a good investment & talked about the need to pay attention to the laws of physics.  We talked about He3 on the Moon, fusion energy possibilities & more.  I read an email from a London listener asking about the Apollo rocket & mission sounds on Apollo 7.  We talked some more about the problems on board Apollo 7, this time regarding Wally & the TV broadcast delay & the wearing of the newly designed helmets during reentry.  Walt talked about climate change & global warming, urging people to do their own research & examine the data rather than believing what people had to say regardless of their position.  John in Atlanta called in about global warming & said that there was no practical mitigation strategy. Our guest shared what he perceived to be the true motivation of global warming extremists.  John also talked about having built a next gen space shuttle from the old space shuttle to avoid retiring it or having to build an entirely new & very costly program.  Walt supported that idea but history proved otherwise.  Toward the end we discussed the pros & cons of international cooperation & competition, Ares 1 as a safe rocket for HSF, & the cost of the ISS being more due to international cooperation.  Our final topic was risk versus reckless behavior & the difference between the two.

If you have comments/questions, please post them on The Space Show blog.