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Dr. Eligar Sadeh, Tuesday, 2-24-15 February 25, 2015

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Dr. Eligar Sadeh, Tuesday, 2-24-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2422-BWB-2015-02-24.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Eligar Sadeh.  Topics:  Export Control modifications & current affairs in space development/exploration.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back Dr. Eligar Sadeh to update us on changes in the export control regimes for the U.S.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 44 minute segment, Dr. Sadeh discussed new changes in export control, mainly for satellites.  As Dr. Sadeh explained it, the new regime was moving toward self-policing by the industry with minimum government oversight.  During this segment, Eligar explained this, noted the changes from the previous ITAR regime, and we talked about the self-policing nature of the new regime. I took a rather “doubting thomas” view of the self-policing aspects of the new regime, both from a government and industry perspective.  Frequent listeners to this program will not be surprised by my view which by the way was rebuked by several callers to the show supporting the self-policing and minimum government oversight methodology as explained by our guest.  During this segment, we also inquired about the small satellites, cubesats, and the burden falling on the companies for compliance, even smaller start-up companies.  Eligar said many times that the process was in transition but the final rules have been published and now it is up to the companies to follow them.  When asked about major transition issues, our guest cited liability shifting to the companies and the self compliance issues plus monitoring.  As the segment was ending, Dave called in as one of the rebukes to my skeptical comments to make comparisons to similar changed that happened in the nuclear power industry in 1996.

In the second segment, Ft. Worth John (there are so many John’s calling the show I feel compelled to identify which John called) to support the new regime and to disagree with my skeptical analysis.  John offered some good insights and he made some excellent comments that added to our discussion.  Later in this segment, I asked Eligar for his thoughts on public private partnerships, international space partnerships, human spaceflight, robotic missions and more.  Christine in Salem sent us an email asking why Congress and those making space policy fail to value space as we in the advocate and enthusiast community value it.  Eligar challenged Christine with a comprehensive and very interesting reply.  Eligar was then asked if the new export regime was reached in a bi-partisan way.  Our guest had much to say about space being bi-partisan.  He also spoke about the academic journal Astropolitics as he is the editor of the journal.  Tim from Huntsville was our last caller.  He inquired about collision and liability issues  for small sats colliding with large satellites.

If you have questions/comments please post them on TSS blog per the above URL.  You can reach Dr. Sadeh through me.

 

Dr. Edgar Bering, Friday, 1-30-15 January 31, 2015

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Dr. Edgar Bering, Friday, 1-30-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2404-BWB-2015-01-30.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Edgar Bering; Topics:  “Mars Rover Model Celebration and Competition,” Dr. Bering’s undergraduate student balloon projects, cubesat project to Mars.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Edgar Bering  to the show to discuss the “Mars Rover Model Celebration and Competition ” and his undergraduate student balloon projects to study the Northern Lights and more.  During our one segment one hour program, we focused the first half on the Mars Rover Celebration aimed at both elementary and middle school students while in the second part of the segment, we talked about Dr. Bering’s balloon projects and even a possible cubesat to Mars project.  Dr. Bering explained the Mars Rover Model competition which has the students doing a six week Mars course in preparation for their rover mock-ups.  You can learn more about this competition at their website, http://marsrover.phys.uh.edu/about.php.  Dr. Bering took us through the requirements, differences in the competition for the elementary school students compared to the middle school students and he even responded to a question as to how to get a six week Mars curriculum into the school program.  He said the rover categories included a free form model rover made of “stuff” plus a solar power model, and for the older students a radio controlled model made from the parts of an RC model car.  Our guest would asked if the model rover program would work for going to the Moon, not just Mars.  He said yes but don’t miss his full reply.

In the second half of our segment, we talked about his high altitude undergraduate student balloon projects to study the Northern Lights and its effect on the upper atmosphere.  He will be taking his students to Alaska to  see the Northern Lights and to conduct the balloon studies.  He talked about the significant improvements in miniaturizing with the needed electronics, sensors, and cameras, plus today’s high reliability of these components.  He point out that instruments capable of doing the work of today’s instruments would have weighed around 120 lbs. in previous years.  Now they are shooting for a total mass for the instruments of less than 6 lbs for doing meaningful science.  In 1985, the ultra-lute instrument package would have been 50 lbs.  Dr. Bering was asked if his students did cubesat projects and he told us about a possible Mars cubesat project.  He was confident they could get telemetry back from Mars with a cubesat and talked about new antenna improvements.  Toward the end of our discussion I asked if he had any stats on students doing these programs from elementary and middle school and if they went on to careers in space, science, etc.  Don’t miss his response.

Please post your comments on TSS blog above.  You can reach Dr. Bering through the Mars Model Rover website or me.

John Powell, Tuesday, 1-27-15 January 28, 2015

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John Powell, Tuesday, 1-27-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2402-BWB-2015-01-27.mp3

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Guest:  John Powell.  Topics:  John provided us with updates on the activities of JP Aerospace.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com . Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed John Powell back to the show for updates on JP Aerospace (www.jpaerospace.com).  During the first segment of our 1 hour 44 minute program, John started out talking about their UAE mission, crossing the desert in the UAE and raising the UAE flag to 102,000′.  You can see the video of this recent JP Aerospace event at http://www.frequency.com/video/uae-flag-in-space-by-al-hilal-bank/212906510?cid=5-8124.  Next, John took us through an overview and set of updates for their Airship to Orbit (ATO) venture.  He began this by talking about a series of tests they have done and will be doing that will eventually enable ATO.  Much of this information is on the JP Aerospace blog at http://jpaerospace.com/blog.  John went into some detail to describe the tests, especially those that will lead up to eliminating most of the drag at altitude for ATO.  Listeners asked several questions via email about the size of the airship, space diving from Dark Sky Station, and then Charles emailed in a note about air density at 140,000 feet, the altitude of the proposed Dark Sky Station.  For the balance of this segment, John explained the different stages of the ATO program, some of the hardware that was needed, and the JP progress to date.  Greg Cecil called in as a customer of JP Aerospace. He told us what it was like being a customer, the positive impact on his students with JP programs such a MiniCube, plus he emphasized how important it was for John to be an out of the box thinker looking for alternatives to establishment problems such as the high cost to orbit.

In the second segment, John continued talking about the ATO program plus ion engine development.  John from Florida called in and went through the basics of how the program was to work.  During this discussion, speed dynamics for their winged shaped vehicle were discussed, plus JP said they were working on getting power from batteries.  This led to a discussion about JP developing MHD technology which you can see documented on their blog.  I asked JP for the biggest challenges and he said engine work, then described the specific challenges in their engine work.  He also said it was a challenge to scale up to large vehicles from small vehicles.  Tim called in to suggest a reentry system.  JP was ahead of the game on this one and described some of the work they were already doing re these systems.  Scott sent in an email asking JP how one volunteers to work for JP Aerospace.  JP elaborated on the process which starts with an email to him.  His address can be found at the bottom of their home page.  Another listener wanted to know about robotics vs. human flight. JP said they were definitely still in the robotic stage.  Then he talked about their two man submarine, 3D printing, plus updates to his book which may be out later this year.  Finally, he said they were putting their logs together and would soon have a 300 page .pdf MHD study available for purchase on their website for $20.00.  He described the contents of this .pdf study, some of which is on the JP blog.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach John Powell through his website or me.

Tom Olson Year 2013 In Review Oldie Show, Monday, 12-29-14 December 29, 2014

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Tom Olson Year 2013 In Review Oldie Show, Monday, 12-29-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2384-BWB-2014-12-29.mp3

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Guest:  Tom Olson, Golden Oldie..  Topics:  The year 2013 in review for all things space.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

 

We welcomed Tom Olson back to the show for his 2013 space year in review.  Note that this program was pre-recorded on Dec. 19, 2013 for play today, Dec. 31, 2013.  During the first segment of our two hour program, Tom began the review by talking about the Chinese lunar lander now on the Moon.  He expressed concern that Russian and the U.S. may be left behind though we did talk about the private U.S. lunar missions working on getting back to the Moon ASAP.  Tom next talked about NewSpace successes during the year, the successful completion of the COTS program with both the Orbital and SpaceX launchers taking supplies to the ISS.  Tom suggested commercial crew was on time for 2017 and that SpaceX was making good progress with Grasshopper and potential reusability.  He talked about controversy over Pad 39A development, the recent Dream Chaser accident, and the emergency of commercial markets for the ISS with CASIS and Nanoracks. Before this segment ended, Tom talked about the impact of sequestration and space politics for the industry as a whole, then he addressed SLS.  As the segment was about to end, he named a few of the 2013 busts including NASA Redirect Mission, Inspiration Mars, and Mars One.

 

In our second segment, we talked about space advocacy during the year and the success of the 2013 NewSpace Business Plan Competition. Space settlement was discussed and as was NewSpace outreach, including congressional outreach.  Tom talked about progress with the suborbital companies and Virgin Galactic.  This took him to the space tourism topic and the 2014 planned Virgin Galactic operational flights.  Our guest was asked about the regulatory issues in 2013 and what he thought they would be like for 2014. For the most part, he predicted no change.  We talked about financing space ventures and capital acquisition for 2013 as well as start-ups and space entrepreneurs.  He also mentioned Armadillo Aerospace going dark during the year and mentioned the risks to the emerging commercial industry if funds become scarce or hard to obtain.  Though this was a pre-recorded show, there were some advance email questions for Tom. One near the end of the program asked him about plans to do anything with his Colony Fund program.  Tom said it was a great idea but 12-15 years ahead of its time and may someday be brought back to life.  That said, he reminded us that the Colony Fund did advance the space scalable strategy.  Before our discussion ended, Tom updated us on the activities of Walt Anderson and his new ventures.

 

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can reach Tom through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Tom Olson Year 2012 In Review, Friday, 12-26-14 December 26, 2014

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Tom Olson Year 2012 In Review, Friday, 12-26-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2382-BWB-2014-12-26.mp3

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Guest: Tom Olson. Topics: The year 2012 is reviewed from the space perspective and we look forward to space development in 2012. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

 

This program which originally aired on Dec. 31, 2012 as Tom Olson gave us his annual Space Show year in review analysis with a look forward to 2013 for space development. We started our 1 hour 36 minute discussion by remembering those in our space community that are no longer with us. We specifically mentioned three dear friends though we know that others have also left us. Our program was dedicated to Neil Armstrong, Jesco von Puttkamer, and Reda Anderson. We certainly miss our friends but space development marches on like everything else in life. A few of the early issues Tom brought up in the 2012 annual overview of space included the Falcon 9 launches and Dragon missions. He also talked about ISDC and birthing of Dragon during the keynote by NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden. While on the subject of SpaceX and its mission to the ISS, Paul sent in a question asking if SpaceX dropping out of the Stratolaunch project indicated that perhaps they had “bitten off more than they could chew.” Tom and I have no inside information about SpaceX and Stratolaunch but we both thought that Paul’s comment was reasonable as SpaceX is certainly busy enough with game changing projects & technology. Cubesats were discussed given their rise in popularity and importance in 2012. It seems as if their potential is more than on the rise! Cubesat growth also cuts across many diverse space industry segments and niche markets. Bev asked about the future of 3-D printing and its potential impact on future human spaceflight (HSF). 3-D printing is certainly experiencing space industry growth & there will soon be a small 3-D printer on the ISS. Heavy lift came up and much was said about the Falcon Heavy and SLS, both looking back over 2012 & forward to 2013.

 

In our second segment, I asked if fuel depots would evolve from the Power Point & rhetoric stage to something more tangible in 2013. We talked about depots as many of the projects announced in 2012 use depot technology to enable their plan. Tom talked about warp drive becoming more possible due to the 2012 work of Dr. Sonny White. Dr. White will be a guest on The Space Show Friday, January 4, 2013. Tom next brought up NASA budget issues & possible cuts. He talked about science mission cuts, the JWST, and on the HSF side, SLS eating up much of the budget with commercial crew still needing funding. I asked Tom how he thought space advocacy made out during 2012. Mixed was a one word summary of this discussion. Next, we talked about space settlement being made part of the U.S. space policy in 2013. Tom went over the pros & cons surrounding this effort. Doug called in about space settlement & I referred him to earlier programs with Steve Wolfe who authored the Space Settlement Act of 1988 which is part of public law. Tom said space settlement was SLS dependent & that makes the potential policy controversial to many space enthusiasts since many oppose SLS. Tom said 2012 was a good year for new commercial space grandiose missions such as Golden Spike, Planetary Resources, Mars One, a lunar base, Shackleton Energy, even EML2 missions. He kept asking the questions regarding objectives, who pays, the reasons for the missions, and more. He said most of these missions rely on some form of large launcher, either the Falcon Heavy SLS. Tom talked about ITAR reform that has been signed by both houses of Congress & is applicable to the U.S. satellite industry. Human rating of the Atlas came up for a 2012 progress report, then Dave in San Antonio inquired about cyber warfare & the space industry in 2012 & the future. 2012 marked the year the space shuttles went on display in museums & Tom talked about the Russian space program investments for modernization over the coming decade. He also talked about other national space programs. Near the end of our program, we brought up the Spaceport America liability issue & the risks facing the New Mexico spaceport. Tom updated us for 2013 on the NewSpace Business Plan Competition & his work with the Exodus Group for space business consulting.

 

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog. You can email Tom through drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Bruce Pittman, Monday, 10-13-14 October 14, 2014

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Bruce Pittman, Monday, 10-13-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2335-BWB-2014-10-13.mp3

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Guest:  Bruce Pittman.  Topics:  The emerging commercial space industry and related topics.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Bruce Pittman back to the show to discuss the emerging commercial space industry. During the first segment of our 90 minute program Bruce said this was the most exciting time every for commercial space, certain in his 30 plus year career.  He talked about there being a paradigm shift underway, NASA challenges and the progress made in just five short years.  He cited examples with COTS, commercial payloads to the ISS, SpaceX, and lots of smaller companies working with small satellites.  Other examples included the 3D printer on the ISS, the growth of spaceports, the industry spreading out into multiple states, and investment capital coming to the industry.  I asked about human spaceflight (HSF) and he said it was more challenging and demanding but was optimistic that launch costs would come down, especially if reusability enters the market.  Reusability would greatly assist in bringing more commercial options to the table even for HSF.  Jerome in the UK emailed to ask about a commercial space industry outside the U.S.  Both Bruce and I commented on Jerome’s question.  Harry emailed Bruce to inquire if going public was essential for pushing the emerging commercial space industry forward.  Bruce was also asked what excited him the most in the industry.  Listen to his choices. I asked our guest if he saw SLS as an asset to the emerging commercial space industry, being neutral, or being a detriment.  He believes there will be synergistic enhancements for both SLS and the commercial space industry through the development of SLS.  Don’t miss his full comments. Bruce was asked about commercial space ventures being able to finally close a business case and having more than just government as the customer.  Allison emailed us asking Bruce to define paradigm shift.  This also proved an interesting discussion.  Near the end of the segment, our guest was asked bout NEOs and commercial opportunities.  We also talked about two NASA papers in this segment.  The first, “Pioneering Space: NASA’s Next Steps on the Path to Mars” from May 29, 2014 can be downloaded at http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/Pioneering-space-final-052914b.pdf.  The second paper, “Emerging Space:  The Evolving Landscape of 21st Century American Spaceflight,” can be downloaded at http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/Emerging_Space_Report.pdf.  Just before the break, Paul asked about fuel depots for the commercial space industry.

In our second segment, we started talking about space settlement, pioneering, and space exploration.  Bruce explained the differences with pioneering making it possible to have a permanent presence in space by getting in place needed infrastructure and the basics for living in space.  Space settlement would be established after pioneering.  Exploring goes forth to find out what is out there and to return to tell about it.  A listener asked if going to the Moon was a pioneering step on the way to Martian settlement.  Later, Bruce said that pioneering will be driven by economics. In this segment, we also talked about property rights and benefit sharing plus the impact these two issues might have on the emerging commercial space industry.  Risk averseness came up as well.  As we were drawing to a close, Bruce mentioned how all of the industry was in a transitional period, including traditional aerospace.  He suggested things to look for over the coming months included more commercial activities on the ISS, the upcoming Bigelow module for the ISS, & the Google Lunar XPrize.  In closing, we talked about Silicon Valley and the industry as well as the lowering of barriers to entry for emerging commercial space companies.  Bruce also mentioned the Next Giant Leap Conference in Hawaii, Nov. 9-13, 2014.  For more information, see http://2014giantleap.aerospacehawaii.info.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Bruce Pittman through me.

Rex Ridenoure, Monday, 10-6-14 October 7, 2014

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Rex Ridenoure, Monday, 10-6-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2330-BWB-2014-10-06.mp3

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Guest:  Rex Ridenoure.  Topics:  Ecliptic Enterprises updates, commercial space, commercial space and the future.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back Rex Ridenoure to the show for this 96 minute discussion containing Ecliptic Enterprises updates, commercial space programs and business models,  plus much more. In the first segment, our guest provided us with updates for Ecliptic from the time he left the company to do consulting for private missions and then his return to the position he left.  Government sequestration happened about the same time and hurt Ecliptic as you will hear, plus it caused Rex to come back to Ecliptic. You will also hear how business has come back for Ecliptic since sequestration ended.  Rex talked about new contracts, the focus of their business and more.  He spoke about RocketCam and updated us on some of its new market potential plus features and advancements.  We talked about the emergence of cubesat companies as potential Ecliptic customers given the advancements in this field.  Rex talked about a new emerging business line for the company in the form of being an integrating contractor rather than only a subcontractor to a prime.  Export control and ITAR were discussed when I asked if RocketCam was being sold to foreign launchers.  The short answer was no but listen to what Rex had to say about export control and the hope for new rules in the near future.  Rex introduced us to the concept of experiment control on the ISS.  This pertains to experiments on board the ISS being controlled by ground personnel rather than by the ISS crew.  Doug called to ask about the purpose of the Ecliptic projects plus goals for Rex with his work.  Don’t miss the killer reply Rex gave Doug.  Other topics in this segment dealt with rad tolerant hardware as opposed to radiation hardened hardware and streaming data back to Earth on the DSN or another system.

In the second segment, Rex spent most of the time talking about commercial space and his years in service to developing commercial space including early in his career. See the career time table for Rex that I have posted on the blog.  Rex identified a few of the early commercial space projects he was involved with, then he said we had finished the first wave of reconnaissance of our solar system.  Listen to his explanation for this statement.  Rex next talked about one of the next big commercial areas for development which he said would be bringing  space resources to the Earth economic system.  Listener Paul emailed a question asking about commercial space efforts in other countries.  Following that discussion, Rex told us about attending the 10th anniversary XPrize event at Mojave which was an invitation only event.  I asked Rex if people were disappointed that ten years had gone by without commercial spaceflights.  He did say that their was an air of disappointment in the room among those attending the event.  Near the end of our show, Rex was asked about HSF to Mars.  He also talked about the early program Elon Musk wanted to do, Mars Oasis.  SLS came up for discussion, then Rex provided us with a list of take away points for our discussion.  He ended by saying that commercial launch dated back to 1963 and the trend was for more commercial launches and space projects.  He said commercial space was based on a 50 year old proven model.

Please post your comments/questions for Rex Ridenoure on TSS blog per above.  You can reach Rex through me or the Ecliptic website, http://www.eclipticenterprises.com.

Space Show-Secure World Foundation Webinar, Monday, 9-22-14 September 22, 2014

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Space Show-Secure World Foundation Webinar, Monday, 9-22-14

Featuring: 

Laura Delgado López, Project Manager, Secure World Foundation; Yana Gevorgyan,   Senior International Relations Expert, US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration;  Yusuke Muraki, Space Technology Specialist, Asian Development Bank

https://vimeo.com/107098124 – Webinar Video

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2322-BWB-2014-09-22.mp3 – audio only

Guests: Laura Delgado Lopez, Yana Gevorgyan, Yusuke Muraki.  Topics:  Using space and satellite resources to mitigate Earth disasters.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.  You can view the webinar at https://vimeo.com/107098124.  Note that several guests used cell phones so you will hear audio issues from time to time.  Please note that guest and panel member Yusuke Muraki posted a Power Point presentation on this topic which can be found at the end of The Space Show blog  archive summary (https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com).

 

We welcomed Laura Delgado Lopez, Yana Gevorgyan, & Yusuke Muraki to the program to discuss the use of space resources and satellites for mitigating Earth-based disasters.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 58 minute webinar, Laura Delgado Lopez introduced us to the discussion topic.  Laura talked about the benefits & value all people receive from the use of satellite tools in aiding disaster management.  She explained how space tools were used in decision making & how there are more and more new applications coming to market all the time.  Yana Gevorgyan explained the role of NOAA as a government science agency & she talked about extreme weather events.  As a science agency, she also spoke to the science & technology benefits along with the increasing use of international data sharing .  Yusuke Muraki spoke to the role of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in regional economic development, regional disaster management, all being assisted by satellite technology.  They focused on decision management as their programs work to alleviate poverty in the area, track rainfall data & more.  He cited several recent Asian weather and storm events as examples of their role & data sharing among agencies and governments.  I asked our guests about the current & future role of cubesats in this field.  Laura spoke to the reliability of cubesats & the limited amount of data they could send back. She said cubesats were evolving & would one day be more valuable in this area.  Yusuke said cubesats were not yet fully ready for a role in this field but that as they become more powerful they will play an increasingly important role over time.  A listener asked about the use of drones.  Yusuke said they were not very good for covering large areas.  Listeners asked our panel about forecasting and even prevention rather than using these tools for after the event assistance.  Yana suggested that since each disaster is unique, even extreme weather events, lots of data sharing and international cooperation takes place.  She listed several types of disasters that are better understood than others.  Slow onset disasters such as draughts are not as well understood as the extreme weather event or those that unfold very fast.  Another listener emailed in about space assets being used for he Ebola outbreak.  Lots was also said about the role of the U.S. leadership in global disaster management.  Other topics in this segment included disaster policy, federal data management, and accessing data by the public.  As the segment was closing, I asked our guests if the space tools were applicable/useful for individuals impacted by disasters.  As you will hear, the space/satellite tools are not that useful for individuals at this time but more work needs to be done & is being done in this area.  I also inquired about the space IQ of the public and if it was important for people to know that space assets were being used to help them in a disaster.

 

In the second segment, we talked about search and rescue (SARSAT).  Our guests said that since 1982 about 35,000 people had been rescued in the U.S. alone.  Several listeners and I asked about the data, where did it come from, what type of data was it, was there a central clearing house, etc.   Later, I asked what the worst type of disaster there was for management.  Yusuke said the worst disasters dealt with water related activities.  Due to comments about earthquakes, tornados, floods, even tsunamis, we learned that people get used to the warnings and even try to go to locations  to see the disasters unfold. This has proved to be very risky, even the getting used to the warnings is risky on the part of people.  Harold emailed in asking if space tools can stop a disaster from happening.  We also talked about lessons learned and if the lessons were being applied to better handle future disaster events.  Another set of listener inquiries addressed the question of the cost of data and if in a disaster situation, do organizations and governments buy the data or get it for free.  The answer was mixed as you will hear.  Later, listeners asked each guest about the biggest challenges in the field for using space assets for disaster management here on Earth.  Each of our guests offered summary and closing comments, both as to the work done by their respective organizations as well as from the general perspective of available space tools and how they are being used and will likely be used in the future.

 

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  Each of our panel members can be reached through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

 

Webinar(22SEP14)

James (Jim) Faist, Tuesday, 9-2-14 September 3, 2014

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James (Jim) Faist, Tuesday, 9-2-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2308-BWB-2014-09-02.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases Helps Support TSS/OGLF (see www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

If you rate shows on live365.com, email me your rating reasons to help improve the show

Guest:  James (Jim) Faist.  Topics:  Military space, commercial space, NASA, launches, military use of cubesats & UAVs.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Jim Faist to the program for this 63 minute discussion.  We started our first and only segment by inquiring about military space and possible synergies with commercial space.  Mr. Faist cited communication satellites of all types including Direct TV, high bandwidth space communications platforms and infrastructure, plus the push to deep space.  Our guest talked about the new optical coms with much higher bandwidth.  I asked Jim about the time lags from R&D to military space operations to NASA and civil space, then to commercial space companies.  Jim estimated about 5-8 years to military space and about ten years to civil space.  An email listener asked about DoD launches being able to serve as drivers for NASA and commercial space to increase by increasing the launch rate to drive down launch costs.  We then talked about priorities for military space.  Here, we learned that DOD is very concerned with costs but the priority is the mission.   Costs are just one part of the mission priorities..  In general, DOD likes and wants competition and lower prices are important.  One of the points our guest made was that other space nations can spend more on R&D and new projects than we do as a percentage of their budgets since we have to maintain older technology & infrastructure while others that are newer to space don’t have the legacy issues to support & finance.  This brought up a question by Carl who wanted to know if satellite on orbit servicing was worth it or would it be better to go for the new hardware.  The DOD usage of cubesats came up and we compared cubesats to smallsats and finally to the use of UAVs.  You will find the comparisons interesting.  A listener asked about the SpaceX-Air Force lawsuit.  Here, Jim talked about the process for DOD requirements for confidence in launchers and at one point suggested it might be a ten year long process.  I also asked our guest about our building a new rocket motor to replace the RD-180.  Another question focused on the possible DOD use of SLS and heavy lift.  AF Space Command came up as did responsive space and a comparison of that to UAVs.  We talked about DOD public/private partnerships or joint partnerships with civil/commercial space.  Lunar outposts and cislunar space were mentioned as well as the concept of a Space Guard modeled after the Coast Guard. Near the end, I asked about suborbital space tourism/science missions.  Jim mentioned using sounding rockets to test & flight qualify space hardware.  He thought the suborbitals would be good for that.  TRLs came up again & we talked about the role of the Schafer Corp in military space plus their current need for people & their current hiring needs.  Cubesats came up again, especially concerning enough launches and what it might mean for cubesats if they carry propulsion with them as that makes it hard to fly as a secondary payload.  In response to launch issues, he said it was not enough to just focus on the cubesats, the launch side of the business must also be considered & addressed.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can contact Mr. Faist through me or the Schafer Corp website (www.schafercorp.com).

Michael Listner, Monday, 8-25-14 August 26, 2014

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Michael Listner, Monday, 8-25-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2303-BWB-2014-08-25.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases Helps Support TSS/OGLF (see www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

 If you rate shows on live365.com, email me your rating reasons to help improve the show

Guest:  Michael Listner.  Topics:  Space law, ARM & property rights, SpaceX-AF litigation, RD-180 engine & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Michael Listner back to the program for this update regarding specific space law issues and theories.  In the first segment of the this 1 hour 48 minute program, Michael talked about the proposed Asteroid Bill in Congress and how to maybe get some limited property rights for asteroid mining by being able to move a small asteroid as in the NASA ARM project.  Michael theorized that if one moves an asteroid, its no longer in its natural orbit and then no longer defined as a celestial body.  We spent most of the first segment and a good part of the second segment discussing this theory and why it might work.  When asked if it would apply to lunar property rights or other space property rights, Michael was clear that it only applied to a small asteroid that could be moved.  He also said it would require an administration to endorse such a plan and that it would be difficult to establish as customary and it would certainly be an uphill effort.  BJohn and others sent in email comments about this.  As you will hear from BJohn’s emails which I read on air, not every thought positively about Michael’s idea.  Michael also talked about other forms of international agreements being much easier to obtain than treaties.  He also said the property rights policy battles would be fought diplomatically.

In the second segment, we talked about the SpaceX-US Air Force litigation and the AF Motion to Dismiss.  Next, we covered the RD-180 rocket motor issue and Michael noted that a new shipment of RD-180 motors had been received.  He also said there was new information suggesting Russia might want to expand the mission time for the ISS (http://www.parabolicarc.com/2014/08/25/russia-agree-iss-extension).  Property rights and moving an asteroid came back as a topic in this segment & Michael again talked about treaties which he said were top down in policy making while transparency, etc. was considered bottom up policy making.  We talked quite a bit about property rights being US one sided and he said that the Asteroid Bill actually enabled those outside the U.S. to put their projects under U.S. law for U.S protection.  We moved on to cubesats and oversight/regulation issues.  Near the end, Michael updated us on the Code of Conduct in which there should be another draft emerging in the near future.  As the program was drawing to a close, I asked Michael for remaining 2014 legal issues that might get a 2014 resolve.  We looked forward to early next year & our guest commented on issues involving Russia, China, and ESA.

Please post your comments on TSS blog above.  You can reach Michael through me or using the email address he gave out on air as the program was ending.

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