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Henry Kenyon, Sunday, 11-15-15 November 16, 2015

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Henry Kenyon, Sunday, 11-15-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2585-BWB-2015-11-15.mp3

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Guest:  Henry Kenyon.  Topics:  Hybrid airships for potential military and commercial markets plus more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Henry Kenyon to the show to discuss the subject of hybrid airships.  Mr. Kenyon wrote an article on this subject in the October issue of Aerospace America, a publication of AIAA. His article is titled “New life for an old hybrid (www.aerospaceamerica.org/Documents/Aerospace%20America%20PDFs%202015/October2015/AA_Oct2015.pdf.  Scroll down until you come to the article of interest).  In the first segment of our 85 minute program, Mr. Kenyon talked about modern airships, some of the differences from older style airships, plus he talked about different kinds of airships such as blimps, tethered vehicles, Dirigibles, Zeppelins and the hybrids, noting their differences from one to another.  Mr. Kenyon then talked about the Lockheed experimental P-791 airship which is discussed at length in his article.  He also has some very good pictures of the P-791 in the article.  He talked about its hover ability, how it works, size, speed and cargo capability.  We also learned that if fully loaded, it actually has to make a short take-off run to get off the ground.  Mr. Kenyon noted the military uses for a modern airship, then we talked about commercial uses but as you will hear, the commercial side of the project seems to still be emerging.  Henry was asked about UAVs as a competitor to airships.  We also talked about the recent Raytheon tethered vehicle that broke away from the tether due to high winds.  Our guest noted that the hybrid airship such as the experimental P-791 did not use a tether or mooring tower.  A listener asked our guest about cybersecurity given it was part of his bio that I read as I as I introduced today’s guest.  We had a short but very interesting discussion on cybersecurity issues which you will not want to miss.  Before the segment ended, we talked about the cargo capacity of the modern hybrid airship, comparing it to a large jet such as a C-130 or 747,  plus cargo transport times, cost overruns, and technical problems still needing to be resolved.

In the second segment, Henry told us the P-791 was on display at Palmdale, Ca.  I changed the subject and asked him based on his expertise and observations again from his bio, what type of programs were most likely to be cut or eliminated by congress.  You don’t want to miss his analysis on this subject.  Returning to airships, he was asked about the gas used for buoyancy.  This led to a listener questions about why helium over other gasses.  Our guest replied by talking about helium, hydrogen, and market concerns for helium as it is in limited supply since it is a naturally occurring element and not manmade.  Several listeners asked him about the commercial potential, include general delivery of Fed Exp or UPS type packages.  He explained the competition airships would face from existing low cost surface transportation options.  Before the show ended, listeners asked him about commercial business projects wanting to use airships for internet and communication platforms.  Adrian emailed in saying weather would destroy any real serious use of airships though our guest disagreed with Adrian.  Henry said with advanced weather radar and the speed of a modern airship, weather issues were not the same as with older airships that did not have radar or good weather forecasting services.  Henry said a modern airship could maneuver around a storm given their speeds and if they were grounded due to weather, much of aviation would probably be grounded as well.  Henry offered salient concluding comments you will want to hear.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Mr. Kenyon through me.

 

Dr. Doug Haynes, Friday, 11-6-15 November 7, 2015

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Dr. Doug Haynes, Friday, 11-6-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2580-BWB-2015-11-06.mp3

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Guest: Dr. Doug Haynes.  Topics: Blue Ridge Nebula Starline, Blue Ridge Airlines, Haynes Saucer, airline to Mars and more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

 

We welcomed back to the show Dr. Doug Haynes for updates with his Haynes Saucer, Blue Ridge Nebula Starline, Blue Nebula company and his work to fly to Mars offering airline like service.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 16 minute program, Doug went over the history of his aviation and space business development.  He talked about Phase 1 in the 70s, Phase 2 in the 90s, and Phase 3 which is his current phase.  He said his Haynes Saucer was certified by the FAA and the number was 7111NH.  He also talked about his previous work with DARPA and composites.  In response to a listener email, he said he currently had an experimental certification but would transfer to a regular certification soon.  Jack asked him about visiting his facilities. Doug suggested attending his Open House programs which he holds a few times a year. He also talked about the potential of private visits to his Colorado facilities.  I asked him about the size of his operations and how many people he employed.  Doug listed the positions and team spots & said he was still growing.  Terry asked him about his saucer propulsion. Doug said it had three different aspects to it but in general it was ion propulsion with constant 1 g acceleration using gravitics. He said his hover craft used tip drive.  Later, I asked how he generated electricity for his saucer.  Don’t miss his response to this question.  Shelly asked him about human medical factors such as microgravity, radiation, etc.  He said he does not worry much about them due to his very fast transit times with his advanced gravitic propulsion.  Again, don’t miss his full response to this question.  As for vehicle size, it is roughly 9 passengers or less with a crew size of 2, all in his ejection pod which you can see in the pictures on the website as a huge glass like bubble on the top of the saucer.

 

In the second segment, he was asked about his pilots having space flight experience.  He said this was not necessary given they are running an airline plus his very fast propulsion.  Don’t miss all of what he had to say on this.  Clark in Chicago emailed in about the need for heavy lift re payloads & useful payloads to Mars.  He said he was running an airline so he goes orbit to orbit but again, don’t miss all of what he had to say n this topic.  He did explain how passengers would get to the Martian surface, then he was asked if he was cooperating or at least talking to other space companies for participation.  He mentioned Mars One several times as a possibility.  The next subject was ticket prices.  He explained that he was pricing his tickets using the same format as airlines, revenue per passenger mile.  He was going to charge $5 per revenue mile.  I pointed out what it would cost to do a one way 60 million mile flight (not including trajectory distance for reasons you will understand when hearing this conversation), then later he said he would be charging a flat fee of $2 million for the trip.  Spaceports were the next topic as he has been working on establishing the Colorado Space Port at the Front Range Airport near Denver International.  Doug talked about horizontal takeoff and landing only, his escape pod, his takeoff, igniting his engines about 45,000 feet to go to space.  Wayne asked about the Dept. of Defense interest in his project and he said he had been in touch with DOD officials and those channels were open.  Near the end of the show, I asked Doug to explain his E-drive AAMPP which he did.

 

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Doug or subscribe to his email newsletter by using the email address on his websites in the right hand corner.  He uses the “dehas” email.  If you want to subscribe to his newsletter, which I strongly recommend for its entertainment and interest qualities, tell him you heard him on TSS.

Open Lines, Sunday, 10-5-14 October 6, 2014

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Open Lines, Sunday, 10-5-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2329-BWB-2014-10-05.mp3

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Guest:  Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  As this was an Open Lines show, we discussed a wide variety of topic per listener calls & emails.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

Welcome to this two hour discussion on a variety of space topics per listener emails and calls.  During the first segment, our first caller was Dr. Dough Haynes of Blue Ridge Nebula Airlines.  He wanted to talk about his books as well as his advanced propulsion vehicle in the form of a “flying saucer.” He also spoke about starting a drone business and his Open House later this month in the Denver area.  Visit his websites for more information, http://www.blueridgeairlines.com,  http://bluenebula.com.  Given we were at the 10th anniversary of the winning of the X Prize, I asked Doug about his progress as well as the industry’s progress in doing suborbital tourist flights.  He had some interesting comments specifically addressing his technology projects.  I also read an email from B John in Sweden who commented on the Boeing-SpaceX award for commercial crew based on the information I put out in the introduction of today’s show.
Doug from S. California called next and told us about his plans to develop and build an inflatable lunar hab module, perhaps at the UofA in Tucson,.  He went on to describe the hab including materials and size.  He also said this would be supportive of his lunar conference he is planning for Oct. 2015 in Flagstaff, AZ.  He wanted more information, possibly from listeners, regarding sanitation issues in space and recycling human waste.  Toward the end of his comments, we talked about the recent lunar tourism article “A Lunar Road Trip” by Dr. Spudis, http://www.spudislunarresources.com/blog/a-lunar-road-trip.

In the second segment, I read an email from Luis in Venezuela which I will post on the blog on his behalf.  Though it was addressed to Dr. Doug in S. California, others may be interested in it as well.  Our next caller was SLS John in Ft. Worth.  John wanted to talk about the Boeing-SpaceX NASA commercial crew award and why Boeing was rated higher than the other parties.  He spent some time explaining his thoughts, then Alan sent him an email asking if he had finally changed his mind on SLS.  John had not and again explained his SLS position.  I suggested an SLS debate on TSS show with him and Rick Boozer who I will invite for such a program. I did get John to agree to do it.  Before John ended his comments, he brought up the recent Dr. Don Lincoln show about alien contact and UFOs and such.  This turned into quite a discussion about the topic which I really like but admit to very little credible information and evidence existing.  After John left the phone, Marshall called in to say that both sides of this argument often come to the table with their specific interest at the top of the list and that makes it even harder to study as a serious issue.  I also went over the upcoming Space Show schedule during this segment.

Post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach any of the callers or those sending in emails through me.

Space Show-Secure World Foundation Webinar, Monday, 9-22-14 September 22, 2014

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Space Show-Secure World Foundation Webinar, Monday, 9-22-14

Featuring: 

Laura Delgado López, Project Manager, Secure World Foundation; Yana Gevorgyan,   Senior International Relations Expert, US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration;  Yusuke Muraki, Space Technology Specialist, Asian Development Bank

https://vimeo.com/107098124 – Webinar Video

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2322-BWB-2014-09-22.mp3 – audio only

Guests: Laura Delgado Lopez, Yana Gevorgyan, Yusuke Muraki.  Topics:  Using space and satellite resources to mitigate Earth disasters.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.  You can view the webinar at https://vimeo.com/107098124.  Note that several guests used cell phones so you will hear audio issues from time to time.  Please note that guest and panel member Yusuke Muraki posted a Power Point presentation on this topic which can be found at the end of The Space Show blog  archive summary (https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com).

 

We welcomed Laura Delgado Lopez, Yana Gevorgyan, & Yusuke Muraki to the program to discuss the use of space resources and satellites for mitigating Earth-based disasters.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 58 minute webinar, Laura Delgado Lopez introduced us to the discussion topic.  Laura talked about the benefits & value all people receive from the use of satellite tools in aiding disaster management.  She explained how space tools were used in decision making & how there are more and more new applications coming to market all the time.  Yana Gevorgyan explained the role of NOAA as a government science agency & she talked about extreme weather events.  As a science agency, she also spoke to the science & technology benefits along with the increasing use of international data sharing .  Yusuke Muraki spoke to the role of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in regional economic development, regional disaster management, all being assisted by satellite technology.  They focused on decision management as their programs work to alleviate poverty in the area, track rainfall data & more.  He cited several recent Asian weather and storm events as examples of their role & data sharing among agencies and governments.  I asked our guests about the current & future role of cubesats in this field.  Laura spoke to the reliability of cubesats & the limited amount of data they could send back. She said cubesats were evolving & would one day be more valuable in this area.  Yusuke said cubesats were not yet fully ready for a role in this field but that as they become more powerful they will play an increasingly important role over time.  A listener asked about the use of drones.  Yusuke said they were not very good for covering large areas.  Listeners asked our panel about forecasting and even prevention rather than using these tools for after the event assistance.  Yana suggested that since each disaster is unique, even extreme weather events, lots of data sharing and international cooperation takes place.  She listed several types of disasters that are better understood than others.  Slow onset disasters such as draughts are not as well understood as the extreme weather event or those that unfold very fast.  Another listener emailed in about space assets being used for he Ebola outbreak.  Lots was also said about the role of the U.S. leadership in global disaster management.  Other topics in this segment included disaster policy, federal data management, and accessing data by the public.  As the segment was closing, I asked our guests if the space tools were applicable/useful for individuals impacted by disasters.  As you will hear, the space/satellite tools are not that useful for individuals at this time but more work needs to be done & is being done in this area.  I also inquired about the space IQ of the public and if it was important for people to know that space assets were being used to help them in a disaster.

 

In the second segment, we talked about search and rescue (SARSAT).  Our guests said that since 1982 about 35,000 people had been rescued in the U.S. alone.  Several listeners and I asked about the data, where did it come from, what type of data was it, was there a central clearing house, etc.   Later, I asked what the worst type of disaster there was for management.  Yusuke said the worst disasters dealt with water related activities.  Due to comments about earthquakes, tornados, floods, even tsunamis, we learned that people get used to the warnings and even try to go to locations  to see the disasters unfold. This has proved to be very risky, even the getting used to the warnings is risky on the part of people.  Harold emailed in asking if space tools can stop a disaster from happening.  We also talked about lessons learned and if the lessons were being applied to better handle future disaster events.  Another set of listener inquiries addressed the question of the cost of data and if in a disaster situation, do organizations and governments buy the data or get it for free.  The answer was mixed as you will hear.  Later, listeners asked each guest about the biggest challenges in the field for using space assets for disaster management here on Earth.  Each of our guests offered summary and closing comments, both as to the work done by their respective organizations as well as from the general perspective of available space tools and how they are being used and will likely be used in the future.

 

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  Each of our panel members can be reached through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

 

Webinar(22SEP14)

Dr. James (Jim) Wertz, Monday, 2-11-13 February 12, 2013

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Dr. James (Jim) Wertz, Monday, 2-11-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1948-BWB-2013-02-11.mp3

Guest:  Dr. James (Jim) Wertz:  Topics:  Methods for dramatically reducing space mission costs, schedules, & launches.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

     We welcomed Dr. Jim Wertz, President of Microcosm, back to the show to discuss various methods & tools for reducing total space mission costs.  Our guest talked about successful programs and tools that have so far contributed to total mission cost reduction.  In the first segment of our 1 hour 33 minute program, Dr. Wertz started by defining what he meant by reinventing space.  He said this refers to a dramatic reduction in total space mission costs by a factor of 2::10 for schedule related reductions and 2-5 times for space access related costs.  Early on he was asked about reducing costs by increasing the launch rate, a common argument heard in various sectors of the space industry.  His response might surprise you.  Dr. Wertz cited examples to support his comments, specifically Surrey Satellite in the UK (SSTL) as they have been reducing costs successfully for 25 years.  He said modern technology must be used. He also pointed us to his Reinventing Space Project with the USC Astronautics Department.  Also, he pointed us to these websites for more information, www.smad.com/ie/ieframessr2.html and www.smad.com/ReinventingSpace.html.  Dr. Wertz mentioned disaggregation regarding the military using smaller spacecraft and different orbits.  He was asked about cubesats and cubesat launchers, the Scorpius launch vehicle, and NanoEye.  Jim offered sequestration and budgetary comments and pointed out the difficulty in mission planning and more when the nation continues to operate on CR rather than a budget.  He talked about the potential seriousness of the sequestration cuts.  In response to questions about the private sector and SAA type agreements, he pointed out that they exclude the smaller, more creative and innovative cutting edge companies as they are often unable to contribute the required financial portion of the agreement.  Jim pointed out that the goal was to reduce total mission costs, not just launch costs. He said that the launch cost was not always the most costly component of the mission.  As the segment ended, he talked about emergency response and the need for a rapid response, something that is today unavailable.

    In the second segment, we talked about the Cassini Resource Exchange as an effective policy that reduced mission costs and enabled an on time project.  Don’t miss the details about this program.  He again talked about SSTL and pointed out that their attitude is what makes them special & so good.  SSTL has pride in reducing mission costs. We don’t have such pride.  Dr. Wertz talked about Trading on Requirements and why it is risky.  During the first segment, fuel depots were offered up as a possible way to reduce mission costs but Dr. Wertz put them in the marginal category. During this segment, listeners had lots of questions about fuel depots.  In fact, it was as if they cared more about their vision and beliefs regarding fuel depots than the overall message Dr. Wertz was putting out. Clearly fuel depots have the attention of space enthusiasts & sectors of the industry no matter what.  A listener also asked about advanced propulsion concepts as represented by several companies pushing very advanced designs.  Dr. Wertz mentioned that the amateur satellite network could be used to reduce mission costs and talked about the success of AMSAT.  More listener questions came in regarding fuel depots, by far the most common discussion and question topic of the day.  Jim talked about future programs that may offer economies of scale such as SSP.  The last questions came in from Tim regarding our discussion of using pressure fed systems over the use of systems with a turbo pump.  He also wanted to know about rocket reusability.  Jim’s answers may again surprise you.

     Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  You can email Dr. Wertz through me using drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Dr. Nader Elhefnawy, Friday, 6-8-12 June 8, 2012

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Dr. Nader Elhefnawy, Friday, 6-8-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1791-BWB-2012-06-08.mp3

Guest:  Dr. Nader Elhefnawy.  Topics:  Space warfare reality and hype.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We welcomed Dr. Nader Elhefnawy back to the program to discuss his March 26, 2012 Space Review article, “Why we fall for the hype: contextualizing our thought on space warfare (www.thespacereview.com/article/2052/1).”  This was about a two hour program with a break after the first hour.  Dr. Elhefnawy also has two blogs which may interest you: http://naderelhefnawy.blogspot.com and http://raritania.blogspot.com.  We started our discussion by talking about Dr. Elhefnawy’s interest in the subject, his previous Space Review articles on the subject, and the issue of making accurate predictions.  Nader suggested that there is much hype driving the technology predictions suggesting a possible space warfare outcome that also drive political policy in some instances.  He talked about how technology development in the 19th century had more impact in changing the world than modern era technology.  Our guest cited examples of this throughout our discussion but one example we talked about more so than others dealt with the development of the telegraph.  Dr. Elhefnawy suggested that most of the hyped space weapons systems are not doable in the first place.  Another document he cited about this issue was the Joint Vision 2020 report (www.fs.fed.us/fire/doctrine/genesis_and_evolution/source_materials/joint_vision_2020.pdf).  Nader talked about space weapon systems vulnerabilities and again said that the expectations and hype do not match reality.  Several callers engaged with Nader on cause and reaction, SDI, missile defense, anti-satellite warfare, and the pre-positioning of weapons platforms in space.

In our second segment, I asked our guest how we in the public can best defend ourselves against hype, rhetoric, political agendas, and more given we do not have the expertise to always be able to pick up on the excessive claims and fears.  As you will hear, we remain vulnerable to excessive hype not just on technology and space but on a wide range of things impacting our national and international policy.  In this segment we did talk about technology being developed by China, inquiring if Nader thought this was all hype too.  Nader cited some operational stats to drive home some of his points.  Other issues and game changing technologies that came up in this segment included drones and the launch cost for space access. Nader also talked about the Eureka Paradigm and then he received a question from caller Mike about the European Code of Conduct that we have discussed many times on the show.  Near the end, an interesting comparison was made with aerial warfare from 1914-1918.  In just 7-11 years, aviation had advanced to fighting in the skies in WW1.  More than fifty years after Sputnik, the point was made we are not even at the 1914 equivalent level for space warfare, thus supporting Dr. Elhefnawy’s premise that we fall for the hype in this matter.

Please post your questions/comments on The Space Show blog.  If you want to email our guest, please do so through me and I will forward your note to him.