jump to navigation

Dr. Doug Plata, Sunday, 9-13-15 September 13, 2015

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
14 comments

Dr. Doug Plata, Sunday, 9-13-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2551-BWB-2015-09-13.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases Helps Support TSS/OGLF (see www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

If you rate shows on live365.com, email me your rating reasons to help improve the show

Guest: Dr. Doug Plata. Topics: Doug’s Space Advocate Projects present and to do. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Doug Plata back to the show to discuss his space advocate projects that he has already done. In addition, he created a wish list of future advocate projects that he wants to do on his own or in collaboration with others. His 27 page Power Point Presentation detailing all of these projects has been posted to The Space Show blog so please take a look at it and follow along with us during the discussion. Dr. Plata’s discussion follows the PPT page by page. You can see it at https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. In the first segment of our 2 hour 7 minute discussion, Doug explained why he does these projects citing having fun as a major motivating factor.   He does go through the PPT topics and slides in order so rather than going through each one here in the summary, follow along with the PPT presentation on the blog. Some of the project had a more detailed discussion than others such as the theme park ride, the Gravitron which came up in the second segment. Listeners asked him several email questions on a variety of topics including how he could open up his projects to collaboration with others that were not physically in the same location or area as Doug. Doug was also asked if one needed an engineering, physics or other specific background to do what he was doing and Doug said no. I asked Doug if he felt constrained by physics, engineering, human factors medical science, etc. with his projects. This resulted in an interesting and most practical discussion and repose. Doug also coined a great phrase in response to this question, “Physics does not work in Power Point!” Later in the first segment, he talked in detail about large landers and the Centaur upper stage. His PPT shows pictures of his projects and where applicable, he created images to help us along in our understanding. We continued talking about the projects he has already done for the balance of the segment.

In the second segment, we finished the discussion of his already done projects but we spent some time on the Gravitron. Here, Doug talked about additional experiments he would like to do revolving around the Graviton but he was not sure that the ride operators would be all that cooperative with him in allowing him and others to do these experiments. It is an interesting discussion, don’t miss it. Doug soon turned to his wish list projects which start on slide 11. As before, our discussion tracked the slide number so it is easy to follow along with us. Among the listener questions that he fielded in this segment, one asked him how he knew for sure that there was sufficient water ice on the Moon at the poles or anywhere for that matter. Don’t miss his response. John from Ft. Worth called this segment to follow up on his earlier dried food comments. John and Doug talked about dried food, the old C-rations used by the military or the more modern MREs, psychological food, the need to have fresh food, vegetables, greens, and such. Doug explained his theory on what fresh items might be most suitable for growing on say a Mars mission. Later in the segment, both listeners and I suggested Doug organize this and see if he could sell it as a mini-series for influencing kids based on the old Mr. Wizard TV show from decades ago. In fact, thorough out the show, Doug received many suggestions for increased marketing and awareness for his projects like this with little cost, hardly any lab equipment, and in the home environment. When we got to slide 24, Doug had much to say about experiments using a Finger monkey. He was not sure if one would have to do some sort of IRB to use the animal, especially if it was just a space advocate experiment. Near the end of the segment, Doug spoke in detail about humans vs. robots and robots that could repair other robots. Doug offered specific ideas regarding the humans vs. robot debate. He offered us good concluding points but again, he stated that having fun doing these projects was a big part of why he does it & why anyone should do it. One final question came in just before the show ended. This listener wanted to know if he was doing an end run around traditional space advocacy organizations because everything he talked about during our program was individual to him or other advocates. Not once did he make mention of any of the space advocacy organizations. Don’t miss his response to this question.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above. You can reach Doug through me or his website per his PPT, www.lunarcots.com.

                               SpaceProjects

Dr. Lewis Dartnell, Friday, 8-21-15 August 22, 2015

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
1 comment so far

Dr. Lewis Dartnell, Friday, 8-21-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2537-BWB-2015-08-21.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases Helps Support TSS/OGLF (see www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

If you rate shows on live365.com, email me your rating reasons to help improve the show

Guest: Dr. Lewis Dartnell. Topics: Rebooting civilization after a cataclysmic event & extrapolating to starting a space settlement. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Lewis Dartnell to discuss his book, “The Knowledge: How To Rebuild Civilization In The Aftermath Of A Cataclysm,” then applying it to starting up a space settlement regardless of where the settlement might be located. During our 68 minute discussion, Dr. Dartnell started out by giving us the background to his having written the book, some of the applicable constraints for the book, and that it was written for terrestrial events though there were ways to extrapolate some of it to space settlement issues. Dr. Dartnell explained what it would take to reboot civilization depending on why it was destroyed. He listed three possible sources of destruction. One was a viral epidemic or pandemic, another was nuclear war, and another was being hit by a large asteroid or something similar. He also said it might be easier to reboot after a pandemic because infrastructure would still be standing and largely available for use whereas with the other two, destruction would be overwhelming. We talked about skill sets needed to reboot, then we talked about the minimum size for a new community to start over. Here we extrapolated to space, exploring what it would take to start a space settlement. The initial numbers were high but not as high as what would be needed later on. The need for genetic diversity was also high. Several times he referred to needing more women than men for breeding to seed the new settlement, but without genetic diversity and in light of possible in-breeding to get the early numbers up, generations of humans might be born that were genetically weak and that could be a problem. Genetic diversity, needing more women than men, microgravity and radiation issues were just a few of the challenges for the new space settlement. Past the initial number to get the settlement going, to sustain it there would be a need for thousands in the community. You don’t want to miss this discussion as it was an eye opener. Don’t miss why he said he would rather start a new Earth settlement even after a horrific cataclysm than a Martian settlement. He said the Earth settlement would be far easier no matter what the challenges than the Mars settlement. Dr. Dartnell then talked about the possibility that someday an Earth-like exoplanet would be discovered so we compared starting a settlement there as opposed to Mars. To make this comparison, we zeroed out all issues relating to space transportation. You might be surprised by what Dr. Dartnell concluded. Later we compared a lunar settlement with the other two. Much of our discussion revolved around the fact that Earth was and is habitable and even after the horrific event, would remain habitable. Mars is not habitable nor is the Moon. That fact alone is a huge contributor to complexity and challenges. Listeners emailed and called to ask Dr. Dartnell questions ranging from the number of skilled people needed to start a space colony to having sperm banks in space for the genetic diversity required for the new settlement to how free floating habitats might be different in their requirements as compared to planetary settlements. Questions were asked about the problems resulting from human exposure to unfamiliar biology, human contamination of the planet, and the planet contaminating the humans. These were all interesting discussions so you definitely want to hear the full 68 minute program.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above. You can contact Dr. Dartnell through me or The Knowledge website, http://the-knowledge.org/en-gb.

 

 

Dr. Erik Conway, Monday, 4-13-15 April 14, 2015

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
1 comment so far

Dr. Erik Conway

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2452-BWB-2015-04-13.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases Helps Support TSS/OGLF (see www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

If you rate shows on live365.com, email me your rating reasons to help improve the show

Guest:  Dr. Erik Conway.  Topics:  Dr. Conway’s book, “Exploration and Engineering: The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Quest for Mars”  & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Erik Conway to the show to discuss his new book, “Exploration and Engineering: The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Quest for Mars,” JPL history, engineering, Mars missions, and much more all from the historical perspective.  In the first segment of our 1 hour 28 minute discussion, I asked Dr. Conway how JPL engineers did things that led to major Mars exploration breakthroughs.  He cited the Mars Pathfinder mission as an example and the decision to use airbags for the landing.  Dr. Conway took us through the process, the cost benefit analysis of the decision and the role played by budgets, the engineers, policy makers, and others contributing to the mission.  Our guest provided us with other examples as well from other Mars projects and missions.  Listeners asked our guest about human missions.  Here, Dr. Conway had much to say throughout our discussion focusing on the fact that humans are dirty with bacteria, planetary protection is a priority, and there is zero risk or near zero risk for a human mission.  When asked if the Moon required the same planetary protection policies as Mars, he said no though in the early days of lunar exploration, it did.  I asked our guest about the roles played by policy makers and engineers and this resulted is a very interesting discussion. Don’t miss it.  Listener Barbara in Seattle asked our guest about Curiosity cost overruns and how that would be reported on in history.  This led to a discussion about the impact of management and others on the initial design and budgets.  Later, Dr. Conway was asked why JPL had a focus on Mars in the first place.  Doug called in to ask about the humans vs. robot debate for science.  Don’t miss the response to this question by our guest.  Doug also brought up the issue of finding past or present life on Mars and what that might mean for future  Mars missions.  Dr. Conway agreed that probably all sides in the argument of avoiding Mars to avoid contaminating and disturbing life to the opposite perspective will be arguing the issues for a long time to come.  Dr. Conway addressed commercialization and while supporting reduced launch costs said the cost reduction needed to be magnitudes lower than even the lower costs of today.  Dwayne called and addressed planetary protection, then he turned his attention toward asking about the research opportunities at JPL for outside historical researchers.  Erik explained why these opportunities were limited, partly holding ITAR responsible.

In the second segment, Erik talked about the risk versus return on the costs.  He talked about there being almost zero tolerance for accidents and losses with Mars missions and human missions.  He also said the zero risk tolerance for these missions has been a significant cost driver.  Our guest had much to say on this subject with regards to Mars so don’t miss it as it covered most of the second segment. Later in this segment, Jake inquired about the early JPL history and its founders and their impact on the JPL of today.  Penny wanted to know about the Cal Tech-JPL relationship.  Dwayne sent in an email asking about the Faster, Better, Cheaper programs and what happened with the JPL programs using this approach.  This was an interesting way to wind up the show. As we were ending we learned that Goddard has no historian so their programs are not being recorded or document.  I sked Erik the difference in JPL and the APL.  Note how he explained the difference between the two labs, their risk tolerance, and decision process.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Dr. Conway through JPL or me.

Keri Kukral, Monday, 3-9-15 March 10, 2015

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
2 comments

Keri Kukral, Monday, 3-9-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2430-BWB-2015-03-09.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases Helps Support TSS/OGLF (see www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

If you rate shows on live365.com, email me your rating reasons to help improve the show

Guest:  Keri Kukral.  Topics:  Raw Science TV and the Raw Science Film Festival.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Ms. Keri Kukral to the program to discuss Raw Science TV and the Raw Science Film Festival held in December 2014.  During our 61 minute discussion, Keri Kukral started out by telling us about her unique path which included being a professional ballet dancer, then studying bio/electrical engineering at Purdue with notable accomplishments to winning a type of business plan competition to create the online science channel Raw Science TV (www.rawscience.tv).  Together with her team, they created the Raw Science Film Festival which had their first award ceremony this past December.  For more information, visit www.rawscience.tv/raw-science-film-fest-award-winners.  During our discussion, we went back and forth between Raw Science TV and the film festival.  Keri mentioned several of the award winning films, the categories for the film festival, and the special award, the Kip Thorne Gravity Award presented to Dr. Kip Thorne.  We also learned that to see many of the winning movies, we can subscribe to the Raw Science Film Festival by registering in the upper right corner of the film festival home page.  Many of the films can be live streamed for free, others at a modest cost.  Listeners asked Keri about entering the film contest, why internet TV rather than cable, student films, international films, and the science fiction genre.  Later in the discussion she was asked about her ballet career and what advantages dance may have given her regarding science that a more traditional path to science would not have offered her or others.  Another area of questions focused on relating to engineering versus science.  We had an interesting discussion about this, especially as to how engineering related to both the TV channel and the film festival.  Keri was asked about space films on both the Raw Science TV Channel as well as the film festival in comparison to other fields of science.  She offered some interesting perspectives on this subject as well as the questions about engineering.  One listener wanted to know what was included in their definition of science.  Keri explained that they require data to evaluate so a film being submitted needs to be associated with data.  Don’t miss this discussion.  We also talked about music and dance as a form of math and neuro science.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Keri Kukral through me or Raw Science websites.

 

Auditions and Co-host Program, Tuesday, 2-10-15 February 11, 2015

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
3 comments

Auditions and Co-host Program, Tuesday, 2-10-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2412-BWB-2015-02-10.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases Helps Support TSS/OGLF (see www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

If you rate shows on live365.com, email me your rating reasons to help improve the show

Guests:  Space Show Host Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  How to be a guest & co-host on the program plus other topics.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

 

Welcome to our Audition and Co-host program.  During the first segment of our nearly 2 hour program, we did not get any audition calls from people contacting me to put themselves on The Space Show as a guest.  Toward the end of the program I took a call from Andrew regarding his being a co-host and one from Tim with an excellent suggestion for how to be on the program.  More about those calls when we get to the second segment.  For the first segment, Marshall called and talked about three sci-fi books he is writing plus I asked about his daughter who won a Space Show contest years ago and she got a tour of Loral and their satellite mfg. business.  Pooley called and talked about SpaceX, then he talked about the next several books being planned in the Microlaunchers series.

 

In the second segment, John in Ft. Worth called to talk about seeing the video on rocket reusability with Tori Bruno at Stanford. Mr. Bruno is the ULA CEO.  The better link to use when seeing this hour long video is http://youtu.be/iVFz67WCPIw.  John and I strongly recommend it.  Doug began emailing questions to John about depots and his previous calculations regarding the Falcon Heavy.  John admitted to an error in his previous analysis which he discussed that with Doug who was communicating via email.  Our next caller was Tim in Huntsville who suggested blogtalker.com for people who contact me wanting to be on the show.  Clearly such people do not follow my suggestion which is to call an Open Lines show or call when I do the auditions show but with blogtalker.com, they can actually make a short demo talk on their subject or topic for TSS and send me the URL.  Based on how well they do, the interest in the topic plus other factors, that would help me decide if a self-invited guest should be on the show.  Andrew was our last caller and he talked about himself being a co-host for topics dealing with astronomy, telescopes, engineering, machine tools, and more.  Doug communicated with Andrew by email to discuss the role of machining in the setting of an initial base (Moon or Mars) when in situ metals are accessed.  What all could be made?  I am working on this show with Andrew.

 

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach any of the callers through or those sending emails through me.

Mark Bray, Monday, 10-27-14 October 28, 2014

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
1 comment so far

Mark Bray, Monday, 10-27-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2345-BWB-2014-10-27.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases Helps Support TSS/OGLF (see www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

If you rate shows on live365.com, email me your rating reasons to help improve the show

Guest:  Mark Bray.  Topics:  Mark talked about NASA and related issues, his run for Congress, congressional issues, space in the campaign & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back Mark Bray to the program to discuss the role of space policy in his congressional campaign.  During the first segment of our 91 minute program, Mark explained why he was running for congress as an Independent candidate for the 5th District in Alabama.  We quickly focused in on the role of space in his congressional race.  In addition, is space a priority issue, how much of one, and in his district, how space aware are the voters.  I asked Mark about aerospace engineers and other engineers in the U.S. Congress.  I doubt you will be surprised the demographics Mark shared with us.  I also asked Mark for his committee choices should he win and how easy it might be for him to get a seat on one of the science, technology & space committees.  Mark talked about commercial space, the support for it in the Huntsville area, and public/private partnerships.  The art of compromise was discussed & our guest noted the absence of it in congress.  Mark explained the assets a engineer brings to the table in complex decision making and why that background is well suited for being in congress.  Since Mark works on SLS in his engineering job, of course he got a few questions about it.  I wanted to know if members of the public asked or commented to him one way or the other on SLS & its future.  He said SLS comments, when he got them, were more general.  Judy sent in a note about a video on his website, http://www.brayforcongress.com, which focused on the NASA culture of the 60s.  Mark said he was focusing on the new, young NASA that could take on the near impossible and do things because it was not yet a tried and proven member of the government bureaucracy. Today, NASA is the bureaucracy and because of that, it operates differently.  His comments were interesting, don’t miss them.  Bob asked Mark about the private sector creating jobs as opposed to the claims that the public sector creates the job.  Again, don’t miss his reply.  Dr. Rowe asked a question about making astronaut medical data more freely available to researchers, wanting to know if Congress could make such data more readily available.

In the second segment, Mark said he wanted to establish himself as the go to guy on space issues for congress.  Greg called in to talk about why space matters as a national issue.  Tim from Huntsville was the last caller on the program.  He brought up needed ITAR reform to which Mark said there were meaningful reforms on the table that he supports.  He then brought up spaceports and launch restrictions, then I asked our guest to rank campaign priorities including the economy, healthcare, foreign policy, Ebola, ISIS, Russia, and space.  Mark said the economy trumped all issues but listen to see where space is on this list.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach Mark Bray through me.