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Michael Listner, Sunday, 12-1-13 December 1, 2013

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Michael Listner, Sunday, 12-1-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2133-BWB-2013-12-01.mp3

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Guest:  Michael Listner.  Topics:  Space law Review for 2013.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Michael Listner back to the program for this space law review for 2013.  On The Space Show blog at the end of the summary, you will find two presentations uploaded at Michael’s request.  In the first segment of this 1 hour 57 minute discussion, Michael said it was a fruitful year for space law and policy.  He suggested that the paradigm changer was private space development, at both the state and the federal legal picture.  He talked much about the Outer Space Treaty (OST) which provides the legal basis for the U.S. to exercise control over its citizens launching anything to space anywhere in the world.  This subject came up in reference to Mars One and some statements Michael made regarding there wanting to go elsewhere to avoid Dutch law.  Michael explained how the OST presents the Dutch government with the same obligation for its citizens around the world as is the case with the U.S.  Michael then brought us current with the European Code of Conduct, current modifications, and the impact it might have on U.S. space entrepreneurs and launchers such as SpaceX.  He talked about how regulations get enforced as law & how they would make the voluntary code legally binding in our country.  We talked about the need to get an FAA launch license for private companies and how that might be unavailable depending on regulations and political issues.  For a government mission, there is no launch license requirement.  This point was stressed when using SLS for Inspiration Mars came up for discussion.

In the second segment (note we had a phone interruption so there was a short additional break though most of it was edited out), there were several email questions and comments regarding Tito’s recent Inspiration Mars congressional testimony and what it might mean for space law issues if the mission became a NASA project.  Allen asked a question about state law, specifically in California.  Michael explained the relationship between state and federal law in space matters.  During the discussion, Michael referenced many papers by different authors applicable to our discussion. Here are the links to those papers:  Henry Hertzfeld & Scott Pace: http://science.time.com/2013/11/28/hands-off-our-lunar-landing-sites-not-so-fast; National Space Transportation Policy:
www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/national_space_transportation_policy_11212013.pdf; Established Practices for Human Spaceflight Occupant Safety www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/national_space_transportation_policy_11212013.pdf; Space Review article on commercial spaceflight self-regulation: www.thespacereview.com/article/2252/1; FAA decision: www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-02/html/2013-28405.htm.  Our guest talked about these items during both segments of our show, stressing the geopolitical component.  Near the end of the program, we talked about laws to protect the lunar Apollo landing sites and artifacts.  In his concluding remarks, our guest stressed the need to play by the rules.  Such rules may consist of state, federal, and international laws and regulations. Michael also talked about Bigelow Aerospace and his lunar cots like program suggested with NASA.

If you have questions/comments for Michael, post them on The Space Show blog. You can reach Michael through his website at www.spacelawsolutions.com.

Relationship of space law with traditional law

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Bas Lansdorp of Mars One, Friday, 5-10-13 May 11, 2013

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Bas Lansdorp of Mars One, Friday, 5-10-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2006-BWB-2013-05-10.mp3

Guest:  Bas Lansdorp of Mars One.  Topics:  The Mars One mission, a comprehensive discussion.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.  We welcomed back Bas Lansdorp, CEO of the Mars One project located in Holland.  For more information, visit their website www.mars-one.com.

During the first segment of this 94 minute program, Bas took us through the basics of the Mars One concept and mission.  I asked him for clarification as to their company structure given some of the newsletters from last year regarding converting from a for profit to a nonprofit organization.  During the discussion, Bas fielded numerous email listener questions addressing a long list of issues relevant to the Mars One mission.  For example, we talked about why a one way mission, the flight time and launch windows for Mars, radiation, the differences with ISS and Mir crews in LEO as compared to going through the Van Allen Belts and entering deep space with cosmic radiation and possible solar flares.  Bas talked about using 25-40 CM of water shielding.  We talked about the psychological/emotional health of the crew, growing food on Mars, livestock, and a Martian greenhouse.  Resupply from Earth came up & we inquired about the need for Earth resupply as compared to being Martian self-sufficient, plus other life support issues.  Mars One plans on sending cargo missions and supplies to Mars well in advance of the first human mission so Earth resupply may not be what is needed.  Another listener asked Bas about the planetary protection rules and if Mars One was up on them. Bas said yes and appears to be supportive of planetary protection efforts & regulations.

In our second segment, I asked him about his PR given that Mars One gets so much positive PR.  Crew selection questions came in & Bas said the most important qualification for the crew would be to get along in groups.  They plan on teaching the crews all the needed skills so they do not have to select engineers, doctors, etc.  He said that when they hire the first crew, it will undergo the comprehensive training for the mission over 7 years.  Bas got questions about the costs and using a reality TV model for funding purposes.  Bas corrected the listener as their model is the Olympics, not a reality TV show.  Another listener wanted to know about the possibility of their being denied an FAA launch license.  Still another set of questions came in about a Mars One failure leaving an unsupported colony on Mars.  Bas had much to say about this issue so don’t miss his comments.  We also talked about nations implementing the Astronaut Rescue Treaty if Mars One went under & there was no other company in its place.  More was said about the applicants, about 80,000 so far.  He told us most want to go to do something useful to improve humanity and the world. Going because you are unhappy on Earth or something like that will not get you accepted as a Mars One crew member.  Bas said he would be at two upcoming California events for those wanting to meet him, the Space Tech Conference in Los Angeles (www.spacetechexpo.com/conference-program-2013) and ISDC at the end of May in San Diego (http://isdc.nss.org/2013).

If  you have comments/questions for Bas Lansdorp, please post them on The Space Show blog.  You can email Bas through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Rick Searfoss (Col, USAF RET.), Monday, 6-18-12 June 19, 2012

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Rick Searfoss (Col, USAF RET.), Monday, 6-18-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1798-BWB-2012-06-18.mp3

Guest:  Rick Searfoss (Col., USAF, RET.).  Topics: Rocket Flight, XCOR, Lynx, flight safety, leadership.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed back to The Space Show Rick Searfoss to discuss spaceflight flying, XCOR Aerospace, the Lynx, and much more.  You can learn more about Rick Searfoss by visiting his website, www.astronautspeaker.com.  For more about the Lynx and XCOR, visit www.xcor.com.  We started our discussion with an overview of a successful test flight program.  During this discussion, our guest made it clear that flight tests are supposed to detect the unknown and to catch problems in time for them to be fixed prior to surfacing during commercial operations.  The test pilot is prepared for the unknown and this is why he later said that future XCOR pilots would need to have U.S. military test pilot school experience along with their military flight experience.  Also, the testing starts out very slow and escalates based on the progress and analysis of the tests.  One crawls before one runs, so to speak.  I asked him to compare a spaceship test flight program to information I had on a new Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental Jetliner that Boeing was putting through 600 flight hours of flight tests (www.examiner.com/article/new-boeing-747-8-intercontinental-maiden-flight).  Don’t miss this discussion, its interesting, important, & relevant.  Col. Searfoss received an email from Jeremy asking about humans riding on solid rocket boosters (SRB) and the safety in doing that.  This resulted in another interesting discussion.  We then talked about piston pump technology, suborbital flight, turbo pumps, and the XCOR program working with ULA regarding hydrogen pumps.  I asked Rick to describe the Lynx flight from the passenger perspective.  Doug wanted to know about the first flight timeline for later this year and then Christine wrote in asking if the Lynx cockpit would have dual controls similar to an airplane.  A question came in about the Chinese rendezvous & docking per their current mission & Rick’s take on the process given his space shuttle pilot experience.  Rick talked about this with the shuttle in some detail.

In our second segment, Terry called in to ask about the XCOR flight software.  As you will hear, XCOR flight software means humans.  Listen to what he had to say about this, including issues with space shuttle software.  Our guest then talked more about the flight readiness process including the Technical Review Board and Safety Review Board process.  Other topics discussed included citizen science on board the Lynx, ITAR issues, additional Lynx pilot qualifications, and defense dept. applications for Lynx and the suborbital industry.  Lee called in to ask about an evolution to an orbital vehicle, other questions came in regarding runway requirements, passenger height & weight requirements, and spaceports.  Near the end of our discussion, we talked about an emergency exit from the Lynx, spacesuits and bailout.  Also discussed throughout the program were suggestions for the passenger to better prepare for his/her flight.

If you have comments/questions, please post them on The Space Show blog.