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Michelle Cadieux, Tuesday, 12-8-15 December 9, 2015

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Michelle Cadieux, Tuesday, 12-8-15

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Guest: Michelle Cadieux. Topics: Space research, startup organizations, cubesats, important space information sources and more. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Michelle Cadieux to the show to discuss the space startup community, cubesat startups, space research, and much more. I suggest you listen with pen and paper as our guest mentioned several companies and resources that you might want to contact and use. During the first segment of our 1 hour 21 minute program, Ms. Cadieux started out by talking about the Minneapolis based Robotics Alley Conference (www.roboticalley.org). Michelle’s team placed in the investment and innovation category of this conference with a space project which she described on the show. As we learned, her team’s project was the only space project at the conference which caters to the general robotic science and engineering fields. Michelle then discussed the SpaceWorkBench (https://spaceworkbench.wordpress.com/). From this point forward, Michelle offered up organizations and companies doing interesting tings in the space startup community or reporting on it. We talked about cubesat opportunities and options, the possibility of future deep space cubesat, then the subject of the lunar space elevator came up. Michelle mentioned the company Lunar Lift Alliance. The lunar space elevator was mentioned many more times in this segment as well as the second segment of our program. The next topic focused on hackathons around the country. We talked about their market, what they do, crowd funding programs plus Michelle mentioned specific companies and resources for interested listeners. Later in the segment, I asked our guest about human spaceflight opportunities and we talked about space tourism.

In the second segment, Michelle told us about her Facebook site which lists & tells us about startup, hackathon-like and similar events on a national basis. You can find her site at www.facebook.com/creativecommunications?_rdr=p. One event that stood out was the Las Vegas AT&T Development Program with its cash prizes. Todd in San Diego asked our guest about the regulatory environment for the space startups. Next, we briefly discussed asteroid mining with our guest mentioning asteroid valuations. Space law came up, then I asked Michelle about relationships with the hackathon and startup community with the larger aerospace companies such as SpaceX, ULA, etc. Michelle mentioned that many of these organizations sponsor events in this entrepreneurial community. During the remainder of the second segment, cubesats were again discussed along with people’s interest in getting out of LEO and my asking Michelle if she wanted to go to space. Tim called with questions about the lunar space elevator and possibly a Martian space elevator. As the show was about to end, business plan competitions were brought up along with a focus on the need for innovation.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above. You can reach our guest through me or through her Facebook site.

Jim Muncy, Monday, 7-6-15 July 7, 2015

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Jim Muncy, Monday, 7-6-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2502-BWB-2015-07-06.mp3

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Guest:  Jim Muncy:  Topics:  Space Policy, budget issues, company overviews, and more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

 

We welcomed Jim Muncy back to the program to discuss current space policy and budget issues before the U.S. Congress, company updates, and much more.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 50 minute discussion, Jim provided us with the groundwork for most of our discussion by going back to the Commercial Space Launch Act of 1984, then the update to it known as the Commercial Space Launch Amendments Act of 2004.  He talked about both the House and Senate versions of the NASA and space budget bills and some of the differences between the two bills.  One difference which he explained in detail early in the second segment had to do with the learning period which is important for the developing industry.  Another difference between the two revolved around extending the ISS commitment to 2024 plus issues relating to BLEO space.  When asked if he thought the final bill would be signed or vetoed by the president, he said it was nonpartisan and he did not see problems getting it signed into law.  Listeners asked about funding SLS.  Much was said about SLS in both segments but one listener asked Jim why so many supported SLS given its shortcomings.  Jim explained the mindset of many SLS supporters in congress. As you will hear, SLS is hardly a black or white issue.  This discussion led to a related discussion on developing a new rocket engine, the issues involved, the competitors, methane versus other fuel, and more.  In particular, he used Alabama Congressman Mike Rogers as an example supporting is analysis of the situation.  Jim was asked about the impact of the Falcon 9 failure which led him to address the need for multiple launchers and competition.  Later, Alex asked him about his areas of concern regarding the pending budget legislation.  He talked about sequestration, spending caps, delays, and the problem with operating on a CR which is likely.  This is a lengthy but important discussion so don’t miss it.  Before the segment ended, Jim was asked about the lunar lander.  Jim then talked about the Flexible Path, Google Lunar XPrize, cislunar space development and Mars.  Jim advocated the need for public private partnerships, then he was asked about international partnerships.

 

In the second segment, we started with an email question from Doug inquiring about the Augustine Commission presenting an option for returning to the Moon with landers developed in a public-private program context.  After Jim’s response, I asked him to refer back to a comment he made in the first segment and to explain what was meant by the learning period.  This was an important discussion so don’t miss it.  As part of his response, he also provided a short overview of the suborbital industry and participants plus the orbital industry.  A good portion of this segment focused on the importance of the learning period.  Our last question of the evening was from Helen.  She asked Jim if it would be beneficial to ask political candidates in the 2016 races space related questions assuming they know nothing about space.  Jim supported the idea but he told us all to make the question broader than just what interests us in the space industry. He gave several examples of this.  What he said made sense to me so I urge all of you who get a chance to question a 2016 candidate, ask your space question the way Jim suggested.

 

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show Blog above.

Jim Muncy, Monday, 11-17-14 November 18, 2014

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Jim Muncy, Monday, 11-17-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2358-BWB-2014-11-17.mp3

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Guest:  Jim Muncy.  Topics:  Virgin Galactic, Antares, space policy, lunar programs, midterm elections & much more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Jim Muncy back to the show to discuss the recent Virgin Galactic accident, Antares, commercial space, regulations & more.  During the first segment of our 100 minute program, Jim started off by discussing the Virgin Galactic accident and possible new regulations for the industry or vehicle specific to Virgin.  Jim explained the Commercial Space Launch Amendments Act of 2004 in terms of the regulatory regime which already exists and what might come about once the NTSB issues its final accident report.  This is an excellent discussion as well as clarification of the existing and potential regulatory environment so don’t miss it.  Space attorney Michael Listner emailed & called in to support what Jim was talking about regarding regulatory regime for commercial space with the AST.  Doug Messier sent in an email addressing the issue of there being a difference between having an incentive to fly safely and being able to operate safely with regards to Virgin as our conversation had turned to flight safety for the new spaceplanes.  Regarding flight safety, Jim made the point that safety was ongoing and a continued learning lesson, even after the vehicle was in commercial service. I agreed & pointed to commercial aviation accidents that have happened after thousands of flight hours as some defect shows up that late into commercial operations.  Jim seized the opportunity to talk about the choice of wording regarding space tourism and said it was not a good choice of words.  Listen to what he had to say about this.  We talked about negative press after the accident and here Jim stressed that the spaceflight in question was not taxpayer supported and was between private individuals and companies.  It was not the business of journalists or others.  Cost plus contracting came up with a listener question as did several established Republican senators and the role they might play regarding commercial space in the new congress.  Jim had made several earlier comments about the British press negative articles on Virgin and the industry.  I asked him why that was so and said it was largely Richard Branson driven given he is and has been such a controversial person in the UK.

In the second segment, we talked about some emerging commercial lunar opportunities that Jim has worked on for awhile.  He provided the background to the current situation including fights over SLS, Orion, & other big ticket NASA programs.  This is a very interesting discussion because it shows how one can find areas to agree on and work together and even get funded if the amounts are not too large.  I urge you to pay close attention to this part of our discussion.  As you will hear, the end result is the development of commercial lunar programs such as the NASA Lunar CATALYST Program.  Dr. Doug called from S. California to ask questions about CATALYST, public/private partnerships, & the ULA-Masten lunar lander work.  Listeners also wanted to know if  a ULA second stage would ever fly on a SpaceX Falcon Heavy such as the ULA concept ACES (Advanced Common Evolved Stage).  We talked about the Orbital Sciences plan to fly their cargo on another rocket while they sort their engine problems out and a listener asked Jim if he thought the Falcon Heavy would have a significant and positive impact on the dialog supporting the American space industry.  Near the end of the program, Christine in Chicago asked Jim if he was as excited today about commercial space as he was when he started out 35 years ago.  Do not miss Jim’s most reflective and thoughtful response to this question.  Jerry from Florida got in one more question by asking about Space Florida and a spaceport that could operate outside the realm of the Air Force range rules.  Jim had much to say on this as well as there is a definite need for modern range rules for commercial spaceflight.  As the program drew to a close, Benny in Dallas asked about the space interest of Senator Cruz and Becky asked what was going on with California aerospace and politics.  In his concluding comments, Jim hoped the commercial industry would soon be back on track, that 2015 would be a good and safe year for space.  We look forward to talking to him again on TSS.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Jim Muncy through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Rand Simberg, Friday, 11-14-14 November 15, 2014

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Rand Simberg, Friday, 11-14-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2356-BWB-2014-11-14.mp3

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Guest:  Rand Simberg.  Topics:  Test flights, space tourism, policy, recent accidents,  rockets, rocket motors, heavy lift & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Rand Simberg back to the show for a wide ranging discussion on top space news items, the SS2 accident update, space policy issues, and more.  During the first segment of this 96 minute program, Rand led off with the mentioning of the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 12 launch.  Next up was a short discussion about Comet 67P and the Philae lander, then Rand mentioned his current article in PJ Media, http://pjmedia.com/blog/commercial-spaceflights-terrible-horrible-no-good-very-bad-last-week-of-october.  Rand talked about what is currently known about the SS2 accident, the NTSB investigation, & that nothing has been ruled out as a cause or partial cause for the accident.  When asked if he thought the accident would cause the FAA to start regulating the industry, he did not think so but listen to his reply.  This topic also came up in the last segment of our show. Rand mentioned that XCOR was moving ahead & there technology is different from the one employed by Virgin.  He also made a point of explaining multiple times that a test flight was not a commercial flight.  Rand got some listener emails about investment in Virgin and if it was waning.  Helen emailed in asking about a possible lapse in the Virgin safety culture.  Carl emailed in about the impact of the SS2 accident on Spaceport America.  We switched gears and talked about Antares, the Orbital-ATK merger, & the use of Russian rocket motors.

In the second segment, Rand was asked about the possible impact on Virgin’s customer base.  Rand said that the bigger risk was the investment risk.  The RD180 came up again as did the Atlas 5, Delta 4, and the Falcon 9.  We talked about possible midterm election impact and here Rand thought there might be more impact on the DOD side than NASA.  We discussed projects that might be cancelled as a result of the election and the ARM topped the list.  he did talk SLS and thought that eventually it would be shut down, especially if SpaceX gets Falcon Heavy flying.  Rand also mentioned the NRC Pathways Human Spaceflight Study but was critical of it, especially the part that said there had been no and will be no launch vehicle advances for the past 30 years.  Dr. Lurio was our first caller & he wanted to discuss possible FAA regulations, his understanding of the test flight vs. commercial flight policy application & more.  They talked about hybrid rocket motor vibrations and the unknowns regarding the current test flight.  Toward the end of their discussion they joked about using SLS to launch many many cubesats.  Kirk emailed us with a question about methane engine.  Rand had much to say about methane rocket motors so don’t miss his reply.  Rand talked about hybrid rocket motors and some of their problems, specifically for SS2 and Dream Chaser.  I asked our guest about the upcoming Orion test flight and the heat shield comments offered earlier in the week by Bob Zimmerman.  I then asked if he thought there would be a surge in return to the Moon projects.  Michael Listner called in regarding the likelihood of safety regulations coming to pass as a result of the accident.  Rand and Michael had an active discussion about this possibility.  As the program was ending, Rand talked about his book, “Safe Is Not An Option” which is available online and in the ebook format.  Remember, if you buy it through the OGLF Amazon portal, Amazon makes a contribution to TSS.  Rand mentioned he might update the book once the NTSB report on the accident is finalized.  Read Rand’s blog, Transterrestrial Musings at  http://transterrestrial.com.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above. You can reach Rand through his blog or through me.

Michael Listner, Sunday, 10-26-14 October 26, 2014

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Michael Listner, Sunday, 10-26-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2344-BWB-2014-10-26.mp3

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Guest:  Michel Listner.  Topics:  Drones, air traffic control, NASA, SpaceX, patents, reusability, property, space law & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Michael Listner back to the show for a wide ranging discussion on space law issues.  During the first segment of our 95 minute show, Michael started by addressing the NASA program to develop an air traffic control system for drones.  We spent the first part of this segment talking about the system, what it might be like, the partners working with NASA on the plan, the role of the FAA, and related items.  Part of this discussion focused on the need for regulations as Michael said without some regulations there is chaos.  The trick is to balance the regulations to maintain safety and order but also to enable commercial growth.  In this segment, we talked about the Dream Chaser challenge to the decision by NASA re commercial crew with the awards going to Boeing and SpaceX.  To help us understand the appeals process, Michael cited the recent KC-X tanker deal which Boeing appealed and ultimately won the contract.  Michael then updated us with as much info as is known re the SpaceX-AF litigation over the bulk buy, then we talked about the patent dispute with Blue Origin and SpaceX regarding a reusable system meant to land on a barge.

In the second segment, the issues of space property rights & the Asteroids Act came up.  Michael had some interesting observations that he shared with us.  Let us know on the blog what you think about property rights & the Asteroids Act.  A listener asked Michael about the prevailing law should a criminal act be carried out on a spaceship.  Michael explained what would happen if such an event happened in space.  Our guest was asked if he thought the midterm election would make a difference in space policy,  Listeners & I then asked Michael what to look for regarding the balance of this year and into 2015 concerning space legal issues.  Note what Michael pointed out to us.  His concluding comments addressed the need for proper space law to facilitate commercial space growth & exploration.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach Michael through me.

Jeremy Straub, Joe Vacek, Friday, 10-17-14 October 18, 2014

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Jeremy Straub, Joe Vacek, Friday, 10-17-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2338-BWB-2014-10-17.mp3

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Guests:  Jeremy Straub, Joe Vacek.  Topics:  The impact of rules & regulations on small businesses, academics from a smallsat perspective.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Jeremy Straub & Joe Vacek to the program to discuss the impact of rules and regulations on small businesses, startups, entrepreneurs, academics, and researchers, all from the small satellite industry perspective.  Originally we were to do a one hour program but we went long for 80 minutes. in just one segment.  We started our discussion on the light subject of Joe’s all weather bike riding, including the winters in Grand Forks, ND with studded bike tires.  After talking about cross country and all weather bike riding, we talked about how small businesses are adversely impacted by rules and regulations which according to the Supreme Court, have the effect of legally passed laws. Our guests started off citing ITAR and remote sensing as an example.  Most of the rules & regs are in support of the large satellite industry so it can be burdensome on small satellites.  I asked about privacy issues which were addressed in detail during our program.  Our guests said that privacy issues was the opening of Pandora’s Box.  Later in the discussion, privacy came up again in the context of the 4th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.  Our guests talked about the difference in federal privacy issues as compared to state issues, specifically regarding aerial surveillance.  Later, more was said about ITAR issues as well as issues raised by the Export Administration Regulations (EAR).  The issue of the need for a variety of government licenses from different agencies was discussed along with the burden this can cause for the groups we focused on in this discussion.  We talked about compliance, what happens if the rules & regs are violated, even if by accident.  Our guests pointed out the compliance burden on the smaller organizations as well as the legal defense costs if such a strategy is deployed by the companies.  As a possible remedy, both our guests talked about establishing a safe harbor rule which they described during our discussion.  In short, if a good faith effort was made to comply but something was done wrong or missed, a safe harbor rule would help the company avoid significant prosecution.  Our guests strongly recommended doing due diligence on the rules & regulations prior to starting the business or a specific type of mission.  They even suggested hiring a professional to do the due diligence if the company cannot do it themselves but they stressed many times during the segment that it was essential to do thorough rule & regulatory due diligence.  I asked our guests for closing comments.  Jeremy & Joe left us with important points to consider based on our discussion.  We thanked the listeners for emailing in questions and comments.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach either of our guests through me.

Dan Adamo, Tuesday, 9-14-14 September 10, 2014

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Dan Adamo, Tuesday, 9-14-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2312-BWB-2014-09-09.mp3

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Guest:  Dan Adamo.  Topic:  Range safety issues at the proposed Brownsville, Texas spaceport plus much more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back to the show Dan Adamo to discuss his paper, “Range Safety Implications for Brownsville, Texas Launches To Earth Orbit.”  You can freely download the paper by registering for at http://www.spaceenterpriseinstitute.org.  During the first segment of our 2 hour program, Dan started out telling us why he did the calculations and wrote this paper.  Next and for the balance of the discussion, we talked about range safety issues, the enforcing organization which is the FAA, the Brownsville EIR, SpaceX launches & how they might work given the range safety constraints that may be applied to this launch site.  As you will hear, Brownsville is a completely new launch site with zero history or data behind it so as Dan said, it might have been very easy to overlook or even defer the analysis regarding range safety issues.  Also note that Dan said range safety issues are not concerned with the normal or the nominal ground track.  The range safety rules consider what may go wrong and who might be impacted by a failed launch, even if it might be rare that such an incident would happen.  In response to email questions, Dan said that range safety issues apply to the launch regardless of destination though clearly they can limit the choice of destination as in the case of limitations from Brownsville to the ISS. Dan does a good job of explaining this in the first segment and throughout our discussion. He also addressed listener questions regarding a possible difference in the range safety rules for cargo/satellite launches & human launches.  Another issue that came up questioned if FAA range safety rules would be applicable to a private spaceport in the same way for a government launch center like the Cape, KSC, or Vandenberg.  Dan said yes and explained the reasoning behind range safety rules.  Joe emailed in about range safety for Russian launches, then as the segment ended, our guest addressed launching from other parts of the Texas Gulf Coast which he said presented similar constraints as Brownsville.

In the second segment, Alan asked Dan if he would write a simple primer for orbital dynamics to help the untrained person understand the issues better.  Dan will be considering doing that.  The question came up if SpaceX rockets would be required to use explosives on board for a destruct command or if the termination of thrust in a problem launch could be handled by other means.  Dan got specific questions about the EIR and a possible Falcon Heavy launch as well as Falcon 9 launches.  As we neared the end of the show, the subject of reusability came up and then the sparks flew as listeners did not like what Dan said and which I supported.  For the most part, the controversy arose because Dan suggested that some customers may not want to pay for the launches of others through reusability and in fact may need more lift from the rocket or more fuel on board their satellite.  Reusability requires putting extra mass for hardware and fuel on the rocket, not the customer’s payload.  He noted that several Falcon 9 launches had already been made without the reusable hardware.  I supported this economically & suggested that as we move toward a fully commercial launch market, customers will buy the launch that meets their needs.  Some may be OK with the lower launch costs and less payload capacity while others may need all the fuel they can get on their satellite or all the launch power they can get to put their heavy payload into the right orbit.  I made an analogy to the trucking industry where people rent or buy the type and size of truck they need to get the job done & suggested this would emerge for our launch industry in the future.  Listeners objected, remained focused only on lower launch costs & not customer requirements. Several listeners sent in strongly worded emails of disagreement with Dan and me for our comments.   Both Dan and I said over and over again we supported SpaceX in its reusability work and were glad they were doing this work.  We only suggested that the economic of it were still unknown but that would likely change fair soon given the success SpaceX is having with its R&D for reusability.   Still, this did not set well with some listeners.

If you have questions/comments please post them on TSS blog above.  Even your critical emails but remember our rules for civility.  Ideas are fair game, w e do not permit character assassination or name calling.  If you want to disagree with Dan, do so with civility.  Also, if you do want to disagree, brings facts to the discussion as that is always better than just ideas without supporting information to backup the ideas.  You can email Dan Adamo through me.  Be sure to download his paper and read it.

David Hook, Monday, 3-11-13 March 12, 2013

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David Hook, Monday, 3-11-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1970-BWB-2013-03-11.mp3

Guest:  David Hook.  Topics:  General and business aviation security, General Aviation Security Magazine.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We welcomed David Hook back to the program to discuss general aviation security and the new magazine addressing general aviation issues, General Aviation Security.  You can learn more about the magazine by visiting http://gasecuritymagazine.sharepoint.com.  In the first segment of our 90 minute discussion, David talked about what defines general aviation as compared to the commercial airline industry with a scheduled time table.  General aviation has no scheduled time table, operating on demand or at the convenience of someone.  Listeners asked our guest if the FAA and TSA were planning to have some sort of security for the suborbital tourism flights when they start.  Our guest said the FAA had complete jurisdiction over suborbital flights, not the TSA, but that security measures, if any, were not known at this time.  We also talked about the size and scope of general aviation in the country which is approximately 3/4ths of all airline flights in the U.S.  Our guest introduced us to the General Aviation Security Magazine, the type of articles it contains, the writers, and how interested listeners and others can submit an article if they are interested in doing so.

In our second segment, we talked about pilot training, accidents and security, especially since the accident rates are higher in general aviation than in the commercial aviation industry.  Mr. Hook also told us that the company Magzter would soon be distributing the magazine and that they would have an iPhone and iPad app.  For more about the distribution, he suggested visiting www.magzter.com or when the app is released, through the app newsstand.  Listeners asked more questions about submitting articles to the magazine for publication and Dave suggested sending in a query letter before writing the article to make sure the article would be on an acceptable topic.  His address for sending him your query letters is Planehook@hotmail.com.  In discussing listeners submitted articles, he said some photos were welcome with the necessary releases.  He also said that they do not do equipment reviews.  Another topic discussed was using the economic strength of the general aviation industry as an indicator for a recovering and strong U.S. economy.  Dave said the business component of general aviation might suggest an economic indicator as it would indicate business spending going up which should indicate a healthier industry.  Listener Jerry asked about using English as the language for business and general aviation international flights & Dave pointed us to the ICAO rules.  Dave brought up the fact that their appeared to be a bigger drop off of women pilots in recent years than men.  We also talked about special security protocols in place for flying into Washington, DC and the three business airports within that region.  We even talked about the need to have a weapon on board when flying into our nation’s capital.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email David hook at his address below.  Check out General Aviation Security Magazine.

Michael Listner, Monday, 1-2-12 January 2, 2012

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Michael Listner, Monday, 1-2-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1681-BWB-2012-01-02.mp3

Guest:  Michael Listner.  Topics:  National and international space law issues including property rights, the Moon Treaty & more.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomes Michael Listner to the program to discuss national and international space law issues and related matters.  We started out discussing the new Austrian domestic space law and inquiring of our guest why we should take note of this Austrian law here in the U.S.  As you will hear from Mr. Listner, the new Austrian law relates specifically to the UN space treaties and plays a role in international space law.  Our guest wrote a recent article on this subject in The Space Review on Dec. 12, 2011.  You can read his article at www.thespacereview.com/article/1988/1.  Another interesting article of his you might value is in DefensePolicy.org from July 7, 2011 and titled “TCBMs: A New Definition and New Role for Outer Space Security.”  You can download it at www.defensepolicy.org/2011/michlis/tcbms-a-new-definition-and-new-role-for-outer-space-security. Our discussion then focused on launching country issues and liability, satellite operations in different countries and both the Liability and the Registration U.N. Conventions.  This discussion led us to talking about the European Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities and Michael updated us on the status of this voluntary agreement, both on the international front as well as here in the U.S.  Other issues discussed in this segment included space debris and the Draft Russian Chinese Treaty On The Prevention Of The Placement Of Weapons In Outer Space (PPWT).  We also talked about the Chinese GPS system covering Asia, its military focus, and Chinese geo political intersects.  Michael then introduced us to Transparency and Confidence Building Measures (TCBMs) as alternatives to treaties. This prompted several listener questions and comments about “so called” government transparency, the word of governments, and their effectiveness so far.  This was an interesting discussion, especially when I asked our guest for his personal opinion on these types of agreements.  Space tourism became a subject and we spent some time on the liability issues and the states that have passed liability protection laws for the space companies.  Jack from Virginia was listening and provided us with important information about the Virginia law which he largely authored and which has become a model for the laws in Florida, Texas, and New Mexico.  We spent the rest of the first segment talking about liability and space tourism issues. In the second segment, Helen asked if funding levels for NASA and space interests correlated to up’s and downs in space policy.  As you will hear, most policy is driven by politics, not funding levels.  There were lots of questions about the legality of the Moon Treaty and its applicability to commercial space, even Google Lunar X Prize contestants.  We fielded questions on lunar mineral extractions as well as messing with Apollo artifacts on the Moon.  We then jumped over to property rights and what this actually means regarding space issues.  As we were nearing the end of our discussion, I asked Michael if space law was largely an academic field or if it was becoming a career choice field in terms of practical application.  He said it was becoming more and more practical and more and more schools were offering commercial law classes.  If you have comments or questions for Michael Listner, please post them on the blog URL above.