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Open Lines, Sunday, 5-31-15 June 1, 2015

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Open Lines, Sunday, 5-31-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2483-BWB-2015-05-31.mp3

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Guest: Open Lines. Topics: Space Show website & crowdfunding, space industry news, issues, & events covering timely topics. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

Welcome to our final Open Lines program for May 2015. During the first segment of our 1 hour 46 minute program, I threw out some suggested topics for discussion including Space Show website changes, our planned crowd funding project for financing the new website, a satirical article in The Onion, “NASA Announces Bold Plan To Still Exist By 2045” (see www.theonion.com/article/nasa-announces-bold-plan-still-exist-2045-50398), and the possibility of the government regulating lunar and asteroid mining plus other topics as well. Tim from Huntsville was our first caller. He misunderstood my comment about The Onion article and wanted to know what bold plan NASA was announcing for 2045. I clarified the matter with him but he still seemed to think the article had more to do with the reality of NASA today rather than just a comedy article in The Onion. I disagreed with him but he did say that space policy based on a two term administration and then changing was not productive and should be changed. Later in my conversation with Tim I mentioned an LA Times article by Jerry Hirsch which was highly critical of Elon Must for taking government subsidies. Little did I know that this article would be the hot topic of the day on this Open Lines program. The actual article, “Elon Musk’s growing empire is fueled by $4.9 billion in government subsidies” can be read at www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-hy-musk-subsidies-20150531-story.html#page=1. As I sated on air with several callers and emailers, I thought the article was incomplete and a hit piece since it ignored the basic economic facts of government non-cash subsidies. Dennis Wingo called in to refute the article though Kelly Starks emailed us in support of the main theme of the article. During John’s call from Florida, I was asked to see if the article’s author would come on The Space Show. I commented that I was probably not that interested in talking to him and noted my experience with general audience journalists (not all of them) as compared to talking with space journalists. In the meantime, Marshall called to chime in on the presidential cycle and space policy and what it means for long term space projects. We did note several projects that have survived through various administrations such as Hubble, many of the planetary science missions, SLS and more.

In the second segment, Tom, a first time caller to the show from Seattle, wanted to talk about his view of the space industry being immature. By immature, he meant that doing only a hundred or fewer launches a year and not that much new being done in space indicated being immature to him. He also supported Rocket Lab, Planet Labs and the emerging cubesat industry. We talked about the need to lower the cost of space access to get more players and ventures in space. Michael Listner called into to talk in detail about the newly passed House commercial space bill. He said it was passed on party lines and would go to the Senate and there would have to be compromises for it to go to the President. He talked about problems areas including company liability for example. He also mentioned the new title for astronauts who will fly on the Dragon and CST 100, Government Astronauts. By giving the crew this title, they will not be designated spaceflight participants, thus their safety can be regulated NASA and the spacecraft will need some sort of certification or something to fly government astronauts on board. This will allow NASA to set crew safety standards. He referenced a Space Review article which you can read here: http://thespacereview.com/article/2759/1. Doug from S. California was our next caller. He introduced us to the term paraterraforming. Doug explained this to us in some detail. He also called it “reversible exploration.” This discussion included noting the ethical issues around any type of terraforming, radiation, energy requirements, and more.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above. Also, please post suggestions or email me regarding crowd funding incentive and video ideas for creating a new Space Show website.

Michael Paul, Penn St. Lunar Lion, Monday, 3-25-13 March 26, 2013

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Michael Paul, Penn St. Lunar Lion, Monday, 3-25-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1980-BWB-2013-03-25.mp3

Guest:  Michael Paul.  Topics:  The Penn State Google Lunar X Prize entry, the Lunar Lion.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We welcomed Michael Paul to the program, the leader of the Penn State Google Lunar X Prize team, the Lunar Lion.  For more information, visit their team website, http://lunarlion.psu.edu.  Michael brings to the table his experience with NASA and the Applied Physics Lab at John Hopkins as he was the spacecraft systems engineer for the NASA Messenger mission.  During the first segment of our 95 minute program, Michael talked about the Lunar Lion project.  We discussed launch contracts and vehicles, secondary payloads, landing sites, hoppers as opposed to rovers, and what happens to the hardware at the end of the mission.  We talked about the Penn State students working on the project and listeners and I asked questions about his experiences on Messenger being applied to a GLXP project.  The listeners seemed to think this was a step or two down but listen to how Michael explained lessons learned and applications to the Lunar Lion project.  We also talked about funding for their project and that if they win, the money goes to Penn State to endow further space related research and students. We also had a treat in the first segment in that Michael’s 10 year old son was with him. We invited him to the program and it appears we may have a future space guru in the making!

In the second segment, we talked about space education and general audience space enthusiasm and awareness given Michael’s public talks.  He had some interesting comments and experiences to share with us.  We also talked about potential regulations adversely impacting their mission, sample returns, lunar activities and such.  Charles called to talk about up and downstream communications and the use of lasers.  Spacecraft quality control was another issue along with the development of commercial tools for a much broader application than the Penn State GLXP entry.  He also mentioned efficiency in spacecraft design and management but used the term, “a frugal approach.” He explained the difference between frugal and efficiency in terms of spacecraft design & management.  As our program ended, we talked about thermal protection, radiation hardening, film and space subjects and topics.  Our final topic was oversight and 3rd party eyes on their project for review & quality control.

Post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email our guest through the Lunar Lion website or derspace@thespaceshow.com.

Marsha Freeman, Friday, 2-17-12 February 18, 2012

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Marsha Freeman, Friday, 2-17-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1715-BWB-2012-02-17.mp3

Guest:  Marsha Freeman.  Topics:  FY 13 NASA budget, the recently held IAC in Cape Town& the South African space program.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.   We welcomed Marsha Freeman back to the program to share with us her analysis of the FY 13 NASA budget proposal, the recently held IAC meeting in Cape Town and what she learned about the South African space program.  We started by talking about the proposed FY 13 NASA budget.  Marsha was disappointed with major parts of the budget proposal.  Areas that we discussed included planetary science & the ExoMars missions. She also talked about the budget being and what that meant for NASA now & in the future.  Ms. Freeman then spoke about needed economic reforms to encourage investment. Jon called in during this segment to stress the need for ITAR reform. We then focused on the recently held International Astronautical Congress (IAC) in Cape Town, South Africa.  Not only did our guest give us a report on the IAC, but she was able to conduct interviews with the South African director of their new space agency and the Minister of Science and Technology. Minister Pandor delivered a talk at the IAC which you might want to read (www.defenceweb.co.za/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=19684:parliamentary-question-dst-international-astronautical-congress-&catid=86:parliamentary-questions&Itemid=187).  Ms. Freeman talked about how South Africa was using space, science, and technology to uplift their economy.  This was a very intereesting discussion which even includes their perspectives on the U.S. space program then & now.  There is no doubt that this is a harsh comparison for the U.S. but I believe we should all listen and take note of how we are seen by others in the space community.  I realize that what you hear does not apply to 100%  of “others” and much of what was discussed was the opinion of our guest, but I urge listeners to pay attention rather than dismiss these perspectives and opinions.  As the first segment drew to a close, Marsha also talked about the S. African program, what it is doing, how it is working with other African nations to use and develop space to improve all of Africa.  As the segment ended, Marsha told us about the keynote made by NASA Administrator Bolden along with talks by other space agency leaders.

In the second segment, Marsha was asked about a South African astronaut and Mark Shuttleworth came up. This discussion prompted a listener email asking if Mark Shuttleworth or Elon Musk had shown any sign of trying to support the South African space program or commercial/nonprofit space activities there?  Marsha was not aware of any such activities. Much of this segment was about space in Africa, not just South   Africa.  Later in the segment, we talked about the students present at IAC.  Marsha said that quite a few of the students there actually inspired by the Space Shuttle.  Toward the end, Ms. Freeman spoke about the Orion budget again called for investment oriented economic & legislative reforms in the country. As the program was ending, the issue of “sustainability” came up as it has on previous shows.  I again made the offer to send the Howard Bloom speech to Yale students that he made in 2005 to anyone asking for it.  I will ask Howard if I can post it as a .pdf document on the blog with this program review.  If OK, I will modify the blog and website archive to point listeners to the paper.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email our guest through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.