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Brent Sherwood, Monday, 6-29-15 June 30, 2015

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Brent Sherwood, Monday, 6-29-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2499-BWB-2015-06-29.mp3

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Guest:  Brent Sherwood;  Topics:  NASA Discovery Missions, planetary exploration and more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

 

We welcomed Brent Sherwood back to the show to discuss NASA planetary science missions and in particular the Discovery class missions.  During our nearly two hour discussion without a break, Brent started out by telling us how NASA selects Discovery class missions.  He talked about the two kinds of science but focused on the Discovery missions which have a $500 million budget not including launch or operating costs.  He said it was open season on the solar system other than the sun or Earth as they were covered by other NASA programs.  In speaking about the history of Discovery missions, he named a few that we are all familiar with such as Kepler, Grail, Deep Impact, Stardust, the Phoenix Mission, Dawn and the upcoming Insight Mission to Mars.  Brent then explained the proposed missions under the auspices of his team.  These proposed missions include VERITAS, BASiX, CORE, Pandora, Proteus, Psyche, Kuiper, and ELF.  Brent explained each proposed mission to us, talked about the P.I. for each mission, and the science to be gained from the mission.  Listeners had many questions for him including how the principal investigator (PI) was selected.  Brent explained the process, where the PIs come from, how a mission is proposed, is it coming from a university or academic setting, has it been proposed before, or is it coming from JPL or another NASA center or the Applied Physics Lab (APL).  Brent was clear that Discovery missions, given their limited resources, were not about developing and proving out new technology so in answer to my question about the TRL of completing these missions, he said they were all coming in with very high TRLs though the missions sound very futuristic, even bordering on science fiction.  As for timelines, Discovery missions approved now would fly in 2021 so they have about a six year time frame to be developed and flown.  In response to questions, our guest addressed this six year time line in some detail.  All of these missions sounded very exciting but as Brent said, it is a very competitive process and only one or two if any of them may be selected as other teams are proposing their Discovery projects as well and they are equally exciting.  Later in the segment, Brent was asked about the choice of launch vehicle for each project.  This was a very interesting discussion, don’t miss it as our guest explained in detail the role of the PI regarding the launch vehicle and how NASA actually selects a rocket for the mission.  In response to BJohn’s question about launch costs, they certainly factor into the mission planning. Doug asked a question about the Photos-Deimos mission and if the mission could identify a favorable small crater which could later be the site for a covered habitat and if it could identify frozen volatiles in the polar craters of those moons if they exist.  Brent said it might have such capabilities but that these missions only do the work specific to their actual project.  He had more to say on this so don’t miss all his comments.  BJohn asked why not a Uranus mission.  Brent said Uranus was too far out and too costly for a Discovery class project.  Near the end of the segment, BJohn also asked about the importance of miniaturization now and for the future with NASA and these missions.  Brent said it was very important and then updated us on all the cubesat opportunities and uses being integrated into NASA missions.  He spoke about the significance of cubesats for several minutes so don’t miss what he had to say about them.  Doug asked a question about realizing economic value from these missions or at least what was the rationalization behind these purely science missions.  Brent provided an excellent answer to Doug’s questions so don’t miss it.  We ended the show after Brent’s response.  See what you think of it and post your comments on TSS blog.  Doug sent in a final note saying “I agree with his answer re: the value of science.  I believe that it is worth a certain amount of our money to increase our knowledge for its own value.”

 

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  You can reach Brent Sherwood through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

 

 

Webinar: SLS Debate with John Hunt, Rick Boozer, Sunday, 11-16-14 November 17, 2014

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Webinar: SLS Debate with John Hunt, Rick Boozer, Sunday, 11-16-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2357-BWB-2014-11-16.mp3

http://vimeo.com/channels/thespaceshow — Video

 

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Guests:  Webinar with Rick Boozer, John Hunt.  Topics:  Our guests debated the merits of the SLS rocket.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.   Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.  We welcomed Rick Boozer and John Hunt to the program for our special WEBINAR SLS Debate.  You can hear the audio only for this debate as you would any Space Show program.  The video can be found on our Vimeo Space Show Channel, http://vimeo.com/channels/thespaceshow.  Regarding the video, my microphone lock was not working so you will see the mic swing to in front of my face from time to time.  Also, I look down a bit as I take notes to be able to summarize  the discussion.  These issues will be corrected for the next webinar. Rick’s book on the subject, “The Plundering of NASA: An Expose” is available on Amazon.  If you purchase the book and I hope you do, please use the OGLF/Space Show Amazon portal so Amazon will make a contribution to TSS.  Instructions are on the website, the blog, and all program archive summaries.

During the first segment of our two hour webinar, both John and Rick made five minute opening statements followed by a 2.5 minute rebuttal of the position statement by the other guest.  Rick Boozer does not support SLS and John Hunt does support it.  John went first, putting forth a good summary of why he supports SLS, the benefits it provides, and the importance of the project.  Rick’s opening statement outlined why he opposes the SLS rocket, calling it an “existential threat.”  He also said SLS was a “rocket to nowhere.”  The opening statements provided the basic positions for both guests as they debated all aspects of SLS so do carefully listen to their respective position comments.  We took both calls and emails from listeners.  Evon emailed in wanting to know what the money saved from SLS would best be spent on.  John pointed out that there was no assurance that any savings would even be spent on space let alone his priorities.  While Rick agreed, he did list several projects he felt far more deserving of funding, including using the funds to speed up the commercial crew program since it has never been funded to the level requested by the President.  Rick took the opportunity to bring up cost plus contracting and why it was not suitable for a more mature manufacturing project, instead being best suited for R&D projects.  He said that was a driver in the high cost of SLS.  In contrast, John cited his aviation experience with the A12 and P7 aircraft using fixed price contracts, cancellations, and more.  Dr. Doug sent in a note asking about the fundamental need for a heavy lift rocket.  Our guests had a different take on Doug’s question so listen to how they answered it.  Rick pointed out the advantages of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy as compared to the initial SLS version.  In fact, comparisons to Falcon Heavy plus future SpaceX plans and public remarks made by Elon Musk were cited frequently by Rick throughout the program.  John, while applauding the SpaceX accomplishments so far, strongly suggested that we see what the performance actually is on the SpaceX  rockets yet to be tested & flown.  John said we should not be in a hurry to cancel SLS in favor of unproven and as of yet nonexistent technology.  Tim from Huntsville called during this segment to inquire about SLS in light of Falcon 9 success, reusability success and more.  John suggested that reusability would be an important step forward but wanted to wait to see what it looked like when & if it becomes operationally successful.

In the second half of our webinar, Dr. Doug called & inquired about both the Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy as compared to SLS.  Rick referenced an Elon Musk MIT video talk, www.teslamotors.com/forum/forums/elon-musk-mit-interview-video-24-oct-2014.  Rick referenced this talk several times during this segment.  Rick also said SLS would not be going anywhere as there was no budget for its completion.  He cited the references to back up his claims.  Doug also inquired about public/private partnerships, ULA working with Blue Origin, and ULA with Masten.  Andrew sent in an email asking each guest to outline a viable sequence of launch vehicle development and payloads using what hardware.  John took the opportunity to reply to Rick’s budget comments and said there was no way to know what a future congress and administration would do and he listed the rational for keeping SLS going given our state of uncertainty with many space and international issues.  Jerry called from Florida to inquire about the SpaceX super heavy rocket with methane engines as well as the possibility of using a Dragon as a lander.  Adrian emailed a question to our guests wondering if the Chinese lunar program would create a space race or urgency here in the U.S.  Rick then talked about the likelihood of SpaceX getting to deep space before NASA & this would be an embarrassment for NASA and the SLS/Orion gang.  John did agree that if that happened, it would be an embarrassment for NASA.  Kirk emailed in asking Rick about his opening statement when he said SLS would cause the US to rely on Russian in ways other than eating into the commercial budget. He wanted Rick to tell us the other ways such Russian reliance might unfold.  Listen to how Rick responded to Kirk’s question.  Each of our guests provided us with an excellent five minute closing statement.  Rick said the situation was very serious and had the potential to adversely impact the prominence and leadership of the U.S.  Don’t miss his concluding comments.  John reminded us that SLS was the program of record approved on a bipartisan basis, that it was important to have heavy lift capability, and that it preserved skills, work force talent, and needed capabilities for the nation for times when space would be better appreciated & valued.  He said the problems with SLS were all solvable & would be solved as the project moved forward.  Rick quickly got in a question on what capabilities were needed and being preserved!

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach each guest through me.

Dr. Frank Martin, Tuesday, 9-23-14 September 24, 2014

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Dr. Frank Martin, Tuesday, 9-23-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2323-BWB-2014-09-23.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Frank Martin.  Topic:  The NRC “Pathways to Exploration: Rationales and Approaches for a U.S. Program of Human Space Exploration” report.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Frank Martin to the program to discus the NRC human spaceflight study along with all aspects of human spaceflight including various destinations and missions.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 39 minute show, Dr. Martin introduced us to the NRC Pathways study which you can download for free by using Google.  He suggested it was a dose of reality as well as optimism.  He said the study was very clear in saying “show me the money” for those wanting to do humans to Mars missions now or fairly soon and then explained some of the high costs and trades involved in these missions.  One of his overriding themes throughout our discussion was the need to manage a very large mass in LEO in order to accomplish the goals of long duration human space mission.  During our segment, we kept coming back to the need to manage a large mass in LEO and how this translated to costs as well as the need for technology advancement.  Both myself and listeners asked our guest about doing human missions cheaper by using the private sector.  This subject kept coming up during both segments of the program.  We also addressed the rational for human spaceflight.  In addition, the issue of walking away from HSF was looked at for the US as a nation as that is an option. The report attempted to address this and related issues.   Joe sent in an email about the mice on the ISS and using them to determine the gravity RX for HSF.  He sent us several additional emails on this subject as well.  This prompted comments about the need to use the ISS for research in support of long duration HSF missions.  Dr. Martin said Mars was an horizon goal.  In this context, he talked about only a few other possible destinations near us, either the Moon or an asteroid.  He then proceeded to address the issue of managing the risk for a Mars mission.  Beverly asked a budget question and taking the lead from the most recent Mike Griffin interview, she asked Frank if it really was just a choice to be constrained by budget issues.  While Frank agreed it was a choice, he said there were very good ways and choices to spend taxpayer money so he did not see significantly more money for space in the future.  Another listener talked about nuclear propulsion which also crossed into the second segment.  Near the end of the first segment, we got a call from a New Zealand listener.  During his call, the idea of the Buzz Aldrin Mars cycler came up and there was a question or two about fuel depots.

In the second segment, I asked Dr. Martin why the study took 18 months, then SLS John called the program.  John wanted to talk nuclear propulsion thinking it would be a cost saver but what was not known was the accurate cost of the R&D program or the cost for jumping through political hurdles.  John suggested a new administration would make a difference and I challenged that.  I asked Frank given all his years of space industry experience if it was reasonable to expect big changes in space policy due to a change in administrations.  Don’t miss Frank’s reply.  Dwayne called back to question the HSF rational. One of the points made by Dwayne was that cooperation with the Russians on the ISS does not modify Russia’s behavior other than for space.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach Dr. Frank Martin through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Emily Lakdawalla, Friday, 5-30-14 May 31, 2014

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Emily Lakdawalla, Friday, 5-30-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2252-BWB-2014-05-30.mp3

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Guest:  Emily Lakdawalla.  Topics:  The Planetary Society, space geology, robotic & science missions, science mission budget.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Emily Lakdawalla to the program to discuss space science missions, The Planetary Society, space & outer planet geology.  During the first segment of our 90 minute program, Emily went over her background and how she came to have an interest in space and in particular space science and geology.  Some of our topics included the tectonics of Venus, asteroid mining, her interest in the outer planets of the solar system, and science missions either ongoing or to be conducted in the future.  I mentioned a possible Europa mission which led to a Europa discussion and Emily talking about the ESA JUICE mission (JUpiter ICy moons Explorer).  We talked about being able to cut the travel time to the outer planets for science missions and our guest mentioned the possible use of SLS to do that.  Don’t miss this discussion.  Also in this segment, we talked about upcoming comet and asteroid mission, then we switched gears to discuss robotic challenges.  Here, Emily pointed out the time lag for communications to Mars and beyond makes telerobotic control difficult at best.  We talked about having a Mars orbiter to control surface robots.  Were we doing this, the robots could be simpler as they would not need as much autonomous capabilities as they need now based on Earth communications.  Emily told us about Planetary Society projects and programs, we talked about man in the street interviews regarding space & our guest shared her experiences with us when Shuttle Endeavour came to Los Angeles.  Near the end of this long segment, Kepler came up, questions came up about Earth geology being similar to the geology of the planets, the lack of fossil fuels on other planets, then Doug called with a question about coalition building & the NASA science budget.  As the segment ended, we asked Emily about robotic exploration as compared to having a human geologist on the surface of the planet. BJohn from Sweden sent us emails about Curiosity on Mars and Venus.

In our second segment, we talked about relevant time spans and how missions get prioritized.  Emily went over the Venus challenges.  She was asked if the Planetary Society would try another Phobos-Grunt mission and we talked about their project, the Mars Microphone to bring back to Earth the sounds from Mars.  Toward the end of the program, Emily was asked about the importance of lowering launch costs for science missions and the promotion of space advocacy.

Please post comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Emily through The Planetary Society or me.

Mark Fisher, Friday, 5-16-14 May 17, 2014

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Mark Fisher, Friday, 5-16-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2244-BWB-2014-05-16.mp3

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Guest:  Mark Fisher.  Topic:  Commercial & Civil space, Schafer Corp space activities, space exploration/development.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Mark Fisher, VP, General Manager & Director of Huntsville Operations for Schafer Corporation (www.schafercorp.com.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 25 minute discussion, Mark Fisher introduced us to the Schafer Corporation which has in excess of 40 years experience and activity in the civil, commercial, DOD, & the government space industry.  We honed in on civil and commercial and Mark talked about Bigelow Aerospace, Stratolaunch, the entrepreneurial community, and NewSpace.  This discussion took us to new technologies and here Mark said that NewSpace was providing lots of new technology.  We also talked about human spaceflight and its growth, particularly on the NewSpace side of things.  Listener Jack emailed in a question about the wisdom of international partnerships to which Mark had much to say.  I asked our guest about overlapping areas with DOD & commercial space, then about pursuing ROIs from space activities & projects & if that was a big switch from just a decade ago.  That brought up a discussion about business models and the role Schafer plays with clients in business as well as with engineering as Schafer is an engineering company.  One point made continuously by our guest was that space investment leads to results but its an ebb & flow over the long haul.  We talked about space technology, computer, and electronic advances, plus changes over time in materials and optics.  The subject of launch vehicles & the industry came up, especially with cubesats, SpaceX & Orbital.  Pooley called in to talk once again about small launchers & Microlaunchers.  At one point he commented that Leo, being too crowded, should be abandoned for escape orbital opportunities.  Both Mark & I had some interesting comments per what Charles was talking about.

In the second segment we talked about the U.S. capability to build new launchers & engines but we also talked about the high costs and long development & testing time in doing so.  Mark shared with us his rocket motor development experience.  We talked about Mark’s Schafer team, the development of an internship program at Schafer, and Shafer employment opportunities.  A listener asked about difference in approach to the public, civil, & commercial side of space projects & the need for commercial to fund itself.  We talked about wireless medial monitoring, miniaturization, & other space spinoff technologies.  Much was said about the biomedical push by NASA.  I asked about the once robust Huntsville space economy which has had some issues in recent years. An inquiry was made about DOD, Mars technology development, sharing tools with NASA, and if we needed to make weapons to advance technology.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog. If you want to contact our guest, you can do so through me.

Open Lines, Tuesday, 3-4-14 March 5, 2014

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Open Lines, Tuesday, 3-4-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2198-BWB-2014-03-04.mp3

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Guest:  Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  Launch costs, spy satellites, launch reliability, & much more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.   For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

Welcome to our primary March Open Lines discussion.  During the first segment of this two hour program, we followed up from Monday with Tony talking about electric cars, SpaceX, Elon Musk, solar power, PGE electricity rates and more.  He also mentioned that Facebook bought out Titan Aerospace, a company that makes a solar airplane. Later in the program, Tony emailed the news that former Skylab astronaut & Korean War Vet William (Bill) Pogue passed away.  Bill was twice a guest on TSS & a friend. He will missed and we dedicated tonight’s program to his memory.  After the initial call with Tony, Jerry called from Florida to talk about the Ukraine & the space connection, the 2015 NASA budget, and possible Antares problems due to the Ukrainian connection.  Next, Dwayne called to talk about what it takes to launch sensitive and very expensive USAF spy satellites.  He talked about launch reliability as being more important than the launch costs. He associated this with the high costs of ULA launches and then we talked about what it would take for SpaceX to compete in that market.  It does appear that SpaceX is ready to compete per some of the articles that were sent me during the discussion.  Dwayne pointed out the series of Titan failures in the mid to late 90’s, & how this led to more oversight and quality control to make sure the satellites got to orbit.

In the second segment, Tim from N. California called and talked about computer power today making it possible to a SimNASA type venture to refine the NASA budget process, even the overall government budget.  He mentioned a project decades ago, World Games by Buckminster Fuller but back then the computer power was not what is today.   Here we also talked about Big Data.  Dwayne called back, I asked him for news on the Chinese lunar rover and we talked about the Atlas Russian engine, the RD-180.  Dwayne attended hearings last week on Inspiration Mars and reported to us on those hearings.  Doug emailed in wanting to know the number of ULA engine flights as compared to SpaceX engine flights.

Please post comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach any of the participants in tonight’s show through me.

Dr. John Jurist, Webinar, Sunday, 10-28-12 October 29, 2012

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Dr. John Jurist, Webinar, Sunday, 10-28-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1882-BWB-2012-10-28.mp3

https://vimeo.com/channels/thespaceshow – Webinar Video

Guest:  Dr. John Jurist.  Topics:  This webinar focused on rocket mission, planning, risk & cost analysis using copyright protected spread sheets created by Dr. Jurist.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We do not permit the commercial use of any Space Show program or part thereof, nor do we permit Space Show programs to be edited, placed on YouTube, or other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted in news articles, papers, academic & research work, but must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact Dr. Livingston for questions about our copyright and trademark policies. You can see the webinar at https://vimeo.com/channels/thespaceshow.  We welcomed Dr. Jurist to this special two hour webinar on rocket mission, planning, risk, & cost analysis.  Dr. Jurist developed a series of copyrighted spread sheets for this discussion. Callers had the opportunity to “massage” the numbers to see what happened with costs, success probabilities, & how many launches might be needed depending on the rocket being evaluated.  We relied upon published data for all rocket systems discussed, even when only theoretical.  Much of the discussion during this webinar focused on comparisons of Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy, SLS, and the Liberty Launch Vehicle. We also used a Falcon 1e as a baseline for comparison.  Dr. Jurist and the callers planned missions to LEO and the ISS, the Moon, and Mars.  We also looked at costs of total payloads delivered into LEO as a function of launch vehicle reliability and cost for multiple launches into the same position in LEO. Even with our two hour discussion, we did not get to cover several spreadsheet pages that rough out launch vehicle configurations and costs as a function of payload and total production runs. We will cover more of this material in the upcoming parts of this webinar series through early next year.  Dr. Jurist addressed questions dealing with simultaneous launches and third party depot operations including fuel sales and space tug services.  Some other subjects were also discussed in the webinar including the recent high altitude jump by Felix Baumgartner and combating the spin.  We also talked about the recent statement made by Felix about not spending money on Mars missions in favor of saving the Earth.

Please post your comments & questions on The Space Show blog.  Dr. Jurist and I will respond to your blog posts.  If you want to talk to Dr. Jurist about his spreadsheet and your possible use for it, you can email him at jmjurist@aol.com.

Space Show-SWF Webinar, On-Orbit Satellite Servicing, Sunday, 8-19-12 August 20, 2012

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Space Show-SWF Webinar, On-Orbit Satellite Servicing, Sunday, 8-19-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1836-BWB-2012-08-19.mp3

https://vimeo.com/channels/thespaceshow  – Webinar Video

Guests:  Brian Weeden, Richard DalBello, Major General, USAF (Retired) James B. Armor, Jr..  This is a SWF sponsored webinar addressing issues related to the on-orbit servicing of satellites.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, & discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, & any discussion must be relevant & applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS A TWO HOUR WEBINAR PRODUCTION SPONSORED BY THE SECURE WORLD FOUNDATION (SWF).  YOU CAN VIEW THIS WEBINAR AT https://vimeo.com/channels/thespaceshow.  We welcomed Brian Weeden, Richard DalBello, & Major General, USAF (Retired) James B. Armor, Jr. to the program for an in-depth discussion of on-orbit satellite servicing. This is a new business/industry that is emerging with great interest from governments, the satellite industry, & many other interested parties.  During our first webinar hour, our guests explained satellite on-orbit servicing, why the interest in it, the values on the table, & the economics behind this developing industry.  We heard from the perspective of the satellite operator with Mr. DalBello, from General Armor with the perspective of a company wanting to provide these services plus what they are commercially doing now in this emerging industry.  Gen. Armor talked about the new ATK venture for satellite repair, Vivisat (www.vivisat.com).  He was followed by Mr. Weeden who connected the dots with us regarding the big picture implications for security, stability, & policy.  We talked about liability issues, insurance, & LEO & GEO satellites in terms of their respective economic value & lifespan.  A listener asked about GPS satellites, launch costs, & competition here & abroad.  In fact, Brian mentioned several projects outside the US with the Canadians, Germans, & JAXA.  Toward the end of the first hour, caller Jack asked about testing & reliability, wondering if repairing satellites would reduce reliability engineering & testing on the ground, thus lowering the satellite’s cost given the possibility of on-orbit repair.  Ben followed asking if satellites having a longer life would be sold, comparing this potential to selling real estate once a property has been fully depreciated.

In our webinar second hour, Brian described the DARPA Phoenix Satellite Service project, http://www.darpa.mil/our_work/tto/programs/phoenix.aspx.  The issue of satellite abandonment came up & as you will hear, there is no way to abandon any object in space.  Another issue in this segment was space situational awareness (SSA).  We talked about SSA in LEO, with the new entrepreneurial small satellite companies doing LEO ventures, & the implication of this new industry for launching to & operating in GEO.  Later in this segment, we learned that there was no commercial incentive to address the space debris issue. Don’t miss the analysis behind this statement as its important in understanding the space debris issue.  A listener asked Richard about launch vehicle insurance & premiums, specifically for the Falcon 9.  Also in this segment we talked about the NASA satellite servicing mission, the Restore Mission (http://ssco.gsfc.nasa.gov/robotic_servicing_mission.html).  As our webinar drew to a close, we addressed the importance of a STEM education for our young students & the exciting space projects that today’s students will get to do in their careers. Everyone’s closing comments reflected the future orientation & focus for this evolving industry.

Please post your comments/questions on the blog.  If you want to email our guests, send your note to me & I will forward it for you.

 

Dennis Wingo, Monday, 8-6-12 August 7, 2012

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Dennis Wingo, Monday, 8-6-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1830-BWB-2012-08-06.mp3

Guest:  Dennis Wingo.  Topics:  Economic Development of the Moon.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We welcomed Dennis Wingo back to the program to discuss his July 16, 2012 blog article and concept, “Changing the Conversation about the Economic Development of the Moon.”  You can find his article at http://denniswingo.wordpress.com.  We started our first segment of this nearly two hour program with a shout out to NASA, JPL, & the entire Curiosity team for an outstanding job with landing Curiosity on Mars.  Dennis then pointed out that MSL and Curiosity cost about half of a Nimitz Super Carrier.  Dennis then talked about heavy lift and the fact that modern technology, on orbit fuel depots, orbital dynamics, and ISRU usage all provide reasonable and cost-effective alternatives to the need for heavy lift.  In this discussion, he also included the use of a lunar 3D printer.  Dennis listed several new technologies and applications so don’t miss this section.  Dennis next outlined a plan to eventually have boots on the lunar surface at both poles for water and development.  He would start of with robotics. He noted a preference for the north pole.  We talked about our present day capability to get to either lunar pole.  Doug called in from S. California to talk about telerobotics using telemedicine as an example.  During this discussion, we learned that in the use of robotics, about 90%  represents the robots while 10% represents the people operating, servicing, repairing, and maintaining the robots.
In our second segment, listener Larry asked Dennis about timelines.  Dennis suggested by 2020 we could be back on the Moon.  He broke this down in stages to explain why it would take so long to undertake this mission.  He then said we needed a mindset change to go back to the Moon.  The mindset change enables seeing the Moon first for economic development and then science as a secondary objective.  We talked about the international potential for such a lunar economic mission (private, not government), Another listener asked our guest if a Netscape Moment was essential for developing lunar commerce.  Michael called in to talk about the potential legal & regulatory risks for lunar economic missions.  This too was an interesting & challenging discussion, don’t miss it.  Tim called to ask about the use of space tugs and specific launch vehicles as well as new combinations of rocket fuel. Dennis offered us important closing comments about financing such missions, launch cost issues of concern, and allowing government to dictate our future.  Please post your comments/questions on the blog.
If you want to send an email to Dennis Wingo, you can do so through me & I will forward it to him.