jump to navigation

Dr. Mike Griffin, Tuesday, 9-16-14 September 17, 2014

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
11 comments

Dr. Mike Griffin, Tuesday, 9-16-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2317-BWB-2014-09-16.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases Helps Support TSS/OGLF (see www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

If you rate shows on live365.com, email me your rating reasons to help improve the show

Guest:  Dr. Mike Griffin.  Topics: Human spaceflight policy, political choices, space technology, Mars, Moon, Asteroids and more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back to the program Dr. Mike Griffin.  During the first segment of our 90 minute discussion, Mike talked about human spaceflight (HSF) and the commercial space market.  He said exploration would be a government project or at least with government in the lead, especially if the commercial market was not there.  He threw water on the argument that our space policy was budget driven.  Instead, he talked about it being based on choices we make. It was not and is not about the money.  His comments throughout or discussion on this topic supported his argument.  He even said the cost of space for the U.S. taxpayer was around 15 cents/day.  This discussion evolved to one on the importance of leadership which we agreed was in short supply today.  Included in this discussion was Mike’s vision for our space policy & program, plus he explained its importance and value to our nation both today and for the future.  He spoke to the issue of what society wants and the choices it makes that shape our future.  Space should be part of our national policy debate and hopefully such a debate would enable quality choices to be made that keep us on the leadership edge with all nations.   Mike was asked who he thought would be next on the Moon and he said China.  We also talked about the private sector taking us back to the Moon with HSF.  He said that the private sector could do this, capital was not an issue, but for the private sector to do it there needs to be a closing of the business case which he did not see at this time.  SLS John called in & asked about space advocacy diversity which he said seemed to be at war with NASA & whatever the program of record might be.  Mike had much to say about this, especially about inefficiencies in government organizations and projects.  He also said if the private venture or industry cannot make money, then it should be a federal project. Many times during our discussion he said that there are things that a society should do just because they are hard & they don’t have to look good on the balance sheet.  John also asked about the RD-180 engine, Mike offered us his conclusion as to why we should be a new version of the RD-180 so that we do not continue being dependent on Russia for space related hardware, etc.  Later, he was asked about cislunar space development which he said should be a public enterprise.  He cited many examples and models supporting the public development of this important space infrastructure.  SLS was discussed.  Mike very clearly articulated the case for SLS today and again repeated that SLS future missions are about choices, not the budget.  Don’t miss his comments.  As the segment ended, Randy emailed a question asking for the rational & silver bullet for HSF.  In my opinion, Mike gave an excellent response to this question so don’t miss it.

In the second segment, Mike got some questions about NASA doing more R&D and even forming a NACA-like division or program.  We talked about NASA R&D, the need for a NACA-like program and more.  Dave, our caller, commented on leadership, then Bill in Denver emailed in a question about using fuel depots and smaller launch vehicles rather than heavy lift vehicles like SLS.  Again, Mike had much to say about heavy lift, including that while possible to do smaller vehicle launches., the numbers don’t pan out for efficiency.  You need to listen to this full discussion which also addressed some bogus assumptions regarding inefficient heavy lift decision making.  Nuclear propulsion and Vasimr came up, , then we again focused on vision that takes on big challenges because we can!  More was said on lunar colonies evolving to longer BLEO missions plus cislunar commerce, especially cislunar cargo missions.  Another listener asked about being dependent on the Russians for HSF to the ISS and if shuttle was retired too early.  Mike talked about having wanted to fly shuttle at a minimum rate annually until a new vehicle was operational.  We talked about the role of the congress and White House as compared to the role of the NASA Administrator.  Later, we talked about the role of public support and individuals petitioning congress on space policy.  Listen to his story about the Hubble repair mission.  I even asked if poorly written and fantasy driven letters to informed staffers helped or hurt the cause.  Listen for Mike’s response. In summary, Mike said his wish was that people would share is view that there are important things for society to do but that don’t look good on a balance sheet.  In the end, he said he was optimistic that his positive views on space would prevail and that when policy makers realized that China was going to put people on the Moon and what that would mean for the US, it would not be allowed to happen.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.

Dr. James Hansen, Monday, 8-26-13 August 27, 2013

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
2 comments

Dr. James Hansen, Monday, 8-26-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2076-BWB-2013-08-26.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases
Can Help Support The Space Show/OGLF (www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

Guest:  Dr. James Hansen.   Topics:  Neil Armstrong on the first anniversary of his passing.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Dr. James Hansen to the program to discuss his book, the only officially approved biography of Neil Armstrong, “First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong,” on the one year anniversary of Neil’s death.  Dr. Hansen also wrote an op-ed for Space.com which you will find interesting (www.space.com/22510-neil-armstrong-astronaut-icon-remembered.html).  During this one hour 25 minute program, Dr. Hansen had much to say about Neil Armstrong starting with his days as a 21 year old Naval aviator in the Korean War.  In fact, he told us a Korean War story about Neil flying his jet and coming upon North Korean troops exercising.  We also learned that Neil favored aviation over space flight and Dr. Hansen spoke with us as to  why this was so.  Our guest received lots of questions about the Apollo 11 crew, personalities of all the crew members and how the crew interacted with one another on mission work and in their personal lives. He also described Armstrong as being modest and a bit “Garbo-like.”  Listen to his explanation of why he thought that was so.  Dr. Hansen got questions about Neil as a university professor and what his students thought of him, plus did the students pester him about the Moon landing given how modest Armstrong was about the Apollo 11 landing and his accomplishments in general.  We also talked about his role in the Augustine Commission and his perspective about the need to go back to the Moon and to avoid a gap in U.S. human spaceflight capability.

In our second segment, I asked Dr. Hansen to elaborate on the Clint Eastwood effort to do a Neil Armstrong movie.  Dr. Hansen related a good Clint Eastwood and Neil Armstrong golf story to us which you will enjoy.  Our guest was asked about Neil’s role in both the Challenger and the Columbia accidents.  As we learned, Neil turned down an opportunity to be part of the Columbia accident board but he did serve on the Challenger board and Dr. Hansen had much to say about that.   We then spoke about preserving the Apollo landing sites as historical sites, then our guest was asked if the Apollo 11 crew traits discussed earlier in the show were the traits needed for the first HSF to Mars.  Agin, Dr. Hansen had much to say on this issue so don’t miss his comments.  Toward the end, Dr. Hansen spoke about the fact that there were no photos taken of Neil on the Moon as all the photos are of Buzz.  The official line at the time was that such photos were not in the mission plan.  He also told us a never before heard story regarding Jim Lovell & crew selection for the Moon landing.  Dr. Hansen had much to say about these incidents so don’t miss his comments.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  If you want to contact Dr. Hansen, you can do through me.

Dr. Paul Spudis, Sunday, 7-21-13 July 22, 2013

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
1 comment so far

Dr. Paul Spudis, Sunday, 7-21-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2053-BWB-2013-07-21.mp3

 

Your Amazon Purchases Can Help Support The Space Show/OGLF (www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

Guest:  Dr. Paul Spudis.  Topics:  Space policy, testifying before congress, asteroid missions, RTM, and more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed back Dr. Paul Spudis, Senior Staff Scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, to discuss U.S. civil space policy, testifying before congress, NASA asteroid missions, returning to the Moon, ISRU for both the Moon and Mars, and much more.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 41 minute discussion, Dr. Spudis provided us with an overview of our current civil space program and the history behind how this program developed over the last 50 plus years.  We talked about space visions, destinations, fiscal issues, innovation, & more.  Dr. Spudis also talked about his testimony before the House Science Committee which you can read as well as see on the video on his site, www.spudislunarresources.com.  Many listeners asked questions about providing congressional testimony and what our guest thought of the committee members and their interest in what the invited guests were telling them.  Paul also submitted a human spaceflight statement to the NAS for their human spaceflight study. You can find the links to his submitted paper and the NAS results so far on his website or go to the NAS site directly at www8.nationalacademies.org/aseboutreach/publicviewhumanspaceflight.aspx.    Other topics during this segment included our civil space policy & those making policy, congressional authorizations, SLS & Orion, NASA asteroid missions, & NewSpace.

We started the second segment with a listener call about lunar ISRU and multiple uses for the same lander for the Moon and Mars.  A listener asked Paul to elaborate on why he was not supportive of the NASA asteroid missions which he said were similar to PR stunts.  A listener asked about blame & accountability between Congress and the NASA Administrator.  Don’t miss what our guest had to say about each & their role.  Doug called to talk about cislunar architecture & transportation.  I asked our guest about creating a type of business plan to prioritize the steps needed for implementation to establish the space policy favored by our guest. Don’t miss this discussion.  Another listener asked our guest for his opinions on the Inspiration Mars and Mars One proposed missions.  We also talked about the impact of high quality computer graphics on space policy, the difference in interest and focus from the Apollo era to now, & the importance of space advocacy.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog. Dr. Spudis can be reached through his website.

Dr. Jason Cassibry, Tuesday, 10-9-12 October 10, 2012

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

Dr. Jason Cassibry, Tuesday, 10-9-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1869-BWB-2012-10-09.mp3

Guest:  Dr. Jason Cassibry.  Topics:  A technical description and the potential of fusion propulsion.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We welcomed Dr. Jason Cassibry to the program to guide us in our discussion of the potential for fusion propulsion.  At times, this was a very technical discussion.  To assist in following it, I have uploaded to the blog his published paper delivered at the AIAA Joint Propulsion Conference, “The Case and Development Path for Fusion Propulsion.”  In addition, below are the URLs for several articles on fusion propulsion that Dr. Cassibry shared with us: www.uah.edu/news/items/10-research/2501-slapshot-to-deep-space#.UDrKn-iPVuY;
www.popularmechanics.com/science/space/rockets/the-big-machine-that-could-lead-to-fusion-powered-spaceships-9450996; http://io9.com/5921673/nuclear-slapshots-could-propel-a-spacecraft-to-mars-in-just-weeks; www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=23442
and http://nextbigfuture.com/2012/10/zpinch-nuclear-fusion-pulse-space.html.   Dr. Cassibry started out by providing us with a working definition of fusion propulsion.  We talked about nuclear propulsion as well and the overall state of development for fusion energy.  I asked Dr. Cassibry if in their economic projections for fusion propulsion, they considered the political and policy impact on fossil fuel pricing and supply availability.  As you will hear, generally such factors are not included in their studies though he concurred with me that such policies can strongly skew the economics one way or the other.  Several calls came in on a wide ranging group of associated topics.  We talked about the main fusion fuel, lithium deuteride, magnetic nozzles, and the use of a nuclear fission reactor to start the fusion propulsion unit.  Z-Pinch technologies were defined and discussed.  As the segment drew to a close, I asked about funding sources for this research and we learned that most all of the funding is from public sources.

In our second segment, more listeners called in regarding insitu resource usage, nuclear propulsion to start the fusion unit, and the power consumed for all of this.  We talked about using fusion propulsion for a Mars mission and what it did for travel times.  Jason also put forth a suggested time line and path to follow to operation in perhaps 25 years, depending on funding.  More calls came in with fuel questions, vibration impact, G force acceleration, thrust, and more.  Another topic discussed was fusion propulsion for the launch vehicle.  We then compared some real mission travel times such as Cassini, Voyager, and New Horizons, asking what the transit times would have been like using fusion propulsion.  As we were ending the program, I asked about the students entering aerospace engineering at UAH, both the undergrad and graduate level, plus the gender mix of the students.  There appears to be strong demand by the students to study these fields at all levels.  In conclusion, Jason suggested that we could look for breakeven with fusion in about ten years, maybe less.

If you have comments/questions, please post them on The Space Show blog.  Dr. Cassibry’s faculty page at UAH is www.mae.uah.edu/faculty/cassibry.shtml.

 

Cassibry et al case for fusion 072812

Bas Lansdorp of Mars One, Friday, 8-31-12 August 31, 2012

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
2 comments

Bas Lansdorp of Mars One, Friday, 8-31-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1845-BWB-2012-08-31.mp3

Guest:  Bas Lansdorp.  Topics:  The Mars One program from a business, financial, engineering, technical, & human factors perspective for Martian settlement.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed Bas Lansdorp, founder of Mars One to the program to tell us about the program and respond to a wide array of questions pertaining to the Mars One plan.  For more information, visit their website at www.mars-one.com.  Also, check out their FAQ at http://mars-one.com/en/faq-en. If you want to ask Bas & his team questions, use info@mars-one.com.  Dr. John Jurist joined us as co-host regarding many of the human factors, technical, and media financing discussion topics.  Since our topic addressed many of the same issues with crossover for both segments, I have summarized the program without regard to segments.  We started by asking Bas about the Curiosity landing per the European media and the interest in Holland which is his home.  It was clear that Curiosity fever was strong and exciting across the pond just as it was here.  I then asked Bas to tell us about Mars One.  For the next half hour, Bas talked with us about why he started Mars One, plus he went over in some detail the Mars One plan, including financing, technical, engineering, human factors, and research issues.  After our introduction to Mars One, Dr. Jurist and I began asking questions about the Mars One media financing plan, human factors, micro and partial gravity issues, life support issues, and more.  We covered a broad range of issues including launches, launch state liability, family settlement on Mars, children on Mars, pregnancy, before the launch medical procedures, astronaut selection, etc.  We received several listener emails which we discussed with Bas throughout our 90 minute discussion.  After our initial introduction to the Mars One program, our discussion revolved around Bas responding to our questions and those asked by our listeners.  Some other issues discussed included time line, mission delays, the loss of a resupply mission & its impact on the overall Mars One timeline, RX medications on Mars, solar power as compared to nuclear power for Mars One missions, Mars EDL plans for both cargo and humans, outsourcing components for Mars One and payload integration services & needs, plus settlement sustainability issues with possible timelines.

Please tell us what you think by posting comments and questions on The Space Show blog.  For specific questions for Bas or his team, use the Mars One email address but also do post on the blog for the benefit of all listeners.

Walter Cunningham, Tuesday, 6-19-12 June 20, 2012

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

Walter Cunningham, Tuesday, 6-19-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1799-BWB-2012-06-19.mp3

Guest:  Walter Cunningham.  Topics:  An inside view of the American space program from Apollo to today.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, & discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, & any discussion must be relevant & applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed Walt Cunningham to discuss our space program from Apollo through today’s developing commercial space industry.  For more information, visit his website, www.waltercuningham.com.  You can buy “The All-American Boys: An Insider’s Look At The U.S. Space Program” from Amazon & they will make a contribution to The Space Show/OGLF if you use this URL: www.amazon.com/All-American-Boys-Walter-Cunningham/dp/1876963247/ref=onegiantlea20.  I started the discussion by asking Walt about his perspective on Apollo 7 today, 44 years later.  Walt had some interesting things to say about perspective, especially over the past 10-20 years as compared to when he actually carried out the mission.  A few times during our discussion, questions came up about the so called “mutiny” with the crew & NASA ground control so listen to how Walt described what was mostly a non-event despite media & blog reports to the contrary.  He did talk about Wally Schirra, his head cold & the Actifed commercials, but there was far more to the mission & to the significance of Apollo 7.  Dr. Jurist asked about the ride on a Saturn 1B, professors & experiences while both were at UCLA.  We discussed risk regarding his ride on the Saturn 1B. Walt had much to say about risk during the Apollo era as compared to now.  We extrapolated from this discussion to Columbia’s foam issues. We talked about commercial space.  Walt suggested that today’s commercial space efforts were not purely commercial given government funding & missions. He also said that retiring the shuttle when we did was a big mistake.  He then took us through a cost analysis process to illustrate that space is & always will be costly.  At the end of the first segment, one way trips to Mars & reality TV show funding were mentioned.

In the second segment, Terry called with questions about Von Braun. Walt had high praise & much to say about Von Braun & his experiences with him.  Commercial space came up again & I asked him about asteroid mining.  He did not think it would be a good investment & talked about the need to pay attention to the laws of physics.  We talked about He3 on the Moon, fusion energy possibilities & more.  I read an email from a London listener asking about the Apollo rocket & mission sounds on Apollo 7.  We talked some more about the problems on board Apollo 7, this time regarding Wally & the TV broadcast delay & the wearing of the newly designed helmets during reentry.  Walt talked about climate change & global warming, urging people to do their own research & examine the data rather than believing what people had to say regardless of their position.  John in Atlanta called in about global warming & said that there was no practical mitigation strategy. Our guest shared what he perceived to be the true motivation of global warming extremists.  John also talked about having built a next gen space shuttle from the old space shuttle to avoid retiring it or having to build an entirely new & very costly program.  Walt supported that idea but history proved otherwise.  Toward the end we discussed the pros & cons of international cooperation & competition, Ares 1 as a safe rocket for HSF, & the cost of the ISS being more due to international cooperation.  Our final topic was risk versus reckless behavior & the difference between the two.

If you have comments/questions, please post them on The Space Show blog.

Dr. Steve Howe, Tuesday, 1-24-12 January 25, 2012

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
9 comments

Dr. Steve Howe, Tuesday, 1-24-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1697-BWB-2012-01-24.mp3

Guest:  Dr. Steven Howe.  Topics:  space nuclear power for power & propulsion systems, & radioisotope power generators. You are invited to comment, ask questions, & discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, & any discussion must be relevant & applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  You will want to follow the websites along with our guest:  http://csnr.usra.edu/index.html &  www.usra.edu.  If you are interested in the CSNR 2012 Summer Fellowship Program, you can learn more & apply no later than March 9, 2012  from CSNR at  http://csnr.usra.edu/2012_summer_app2.html.  We welcomed Dr. Howe to the program to discuss space nuclear power.  We started out with an overview of both the Center for Space Nuclear Research & the Universities Space Research Association.  Dr. Howe then told us that they were working on nuclear rockets with the Aerojet Corporation, focusing on a new fuel form away from based on tungsten.  During our discussion, he had much to say about this fuel, its advantages, & its testing.  He also talked about ISP & thrust to weight ratios.  He was asked about testing & we learned they plan on doing ground tests at the Nevada Test Site.  Listen to why their tests will be different from earlier nuclear rocket engine tests & how they are expelling the exhaust into the ground.  You will hear There is no radiation, only hydrogen which bleeds into the rock strata.  We also talked about public concern for nuclear power in space, then we shifted our focus to a nuclear rocket mission to Mars.  Dr. Howe told us about the three year Mars mission but also said with a nuclear rocket a one year mission would be possible.  We also talked about the costs for developing the nuclear rocket as well as the possibility of other countries doing it before the U.S.  Next, we talked about the use of uranium & even the possibility of thorium, including why thorium is not useful for weapons. One listener question asked about the Mars Direct method & insitu resource utilization.  Dr. Howe supported the use of insitu but suggested it for later trips as it might be too risky for the initial trips.  He then described their Mars Hopper project which will certainly interest us all.  As this segment ended, we talked about using the nuclear rocket for going to the Moon & for a lunar & even Martian habitat. 

As we started our second segment, Dr. Howe was asked if QuickLaunch could be useful.  Dr. Dewar sent in a clarification note about U-233 as a byproduct of  thorium & why its a problem for weapons.  In talking about a lunar habitat, Dr. Howe told us about the NASA Fission Surface Power Program (FSP).  We also talked about using the new tungsten fuel for habitats.  He told us about the Nuclear Thermal Mars Sample Mission Study that compared the nuclear rocket to Delta IV launches.  Listeners asked about Vasimr & our guest was asked to clarify for us the differences between nuclear electric propulsion & nuclear thermal propulsion & why the latter is preferable.  Dr. Dewar sent in another note to talk about Y-12.  Later, much was said about plutonium & its pending shortage.  Make sure you hear what Dr. Howe had to say about this looming shortage. Near the end, Dr. Howe mentioned his efforts with Hbar Technologies, LLC, suggesting that possibly using these nuclear advancements for medicine, specifically cancer, might be a driver for space applications. As we concluded, Dr. Howe told us about his books on Kindle & the consolidated all in one book, “Earth Rise.”  Here is the Amazon URL & remember, if you buy it using this URL, Amazon contributes to The Space Show: www.amazon.com/Earth-Rise-ebook/dp/B005LD3LYS/ref=onegialeafou-20

Post your comments/questions on the blog URL above.

Open Lines, Friday, 11-25-11 November 26, 2011

Posted by The Space Show in Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
3 comments

Open Lines, Friday, 11-25-11

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1660-BWB-2011-11-25.mp3

Guests:  Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston. Topics:  Space Show December schedule changes, Phobos-Grunt, MSL, OMB & Mars missions, Space X, NASA policy, human spaceflight & more.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. The Space Show/OGLF is now engaged in its annual fundraising drive. Please see & act upon our appeal at https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com/2011/11/21/space-show-2011-fundraising-campaign.  Welcome to our Open Lines discussion.  We started the discussion with a few announcements. First, I talked about the Droid smartphone podcast timing issue that a few listeners have called to my attention.  For those experiencing this timing issue, I hope the information shared with you from other listeners was helpful. Please let me know either way. Also, listener Theron emailed me as I was preparing the archives and said “Google Listen after the show stops you can go back to the pod cast and it will start up again where it last stopped. They can also go to live 365 and listen there with no problem or listen to the archives and do the same thing.”  I next talked about my December 2011 schedule which is going to be weird to say the least given my need to be in S. California for a good part of the month for family and medical reasons.  Please listen to the discussion on the probable changes for the month and check the website newsletter as I will update everyone on live and replay programs & the use of the toll free phone line when I have updated information.  The first listener question after the announcements asked for my opinion on being able to save Phobos-Grunt (P-G) and the upcoming MSL launch scheduled for Saturday morning.  Regarding the Russian Mars venture, I was not optimistic about its success but like everyone else, I remain hopeful. I then mentioned some of the various blog comments I have seen on P-G and why most of the comments were absurd, showing a total lack of understanding of basic physics and engineering & the P-G mission architecture.  Our friend Charles called in to talk about the science missions of NASA & to offer his perspective on the human spaceflight part of NASA. He brought us current with the N-Prize and his Microlaunchers program.  He got a question asking for his perspective on the Google Lunar X-Prize. Charles & I disagreed as Charles does not think anyone can win it or be successful.  Charles addressed the blog comments re P-G which I mentioned earlier as Charles does understand the science & engineering involved in a space mission.  When we returned from our break, Arnie sent in an email about the OMB possibly killing future Mars mission. I read excerpts from a news release on the issue.  John called in, said we were in a space survival mode. He wanted to know more about the blog article by Trent, “The Case Against Space X.”  Making it clear that I disagreed with Trent, I read excerpts of his article on air as The Space Show airs all sides of issues regardless of my position on the issue.  I do hope Trent turns out to be wrong.  I suppose we will find out in time as Space X and our program continues it evolution.  John asked Charles a question about space debris from his Microlaunchers idea. Charles replied by email saying “main ML missions are to the space between orbits of Mars, Earth. Literally trillions as much space as LEO altitudes. Space exploration begins beyond escape.”  Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog URL above. If you have Droid suggestions, do put them on the blog.  December scheduling or fundraising questions, please email me.