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Charles (Charlie) Precourt, Friday, 8-7-15 August 8, 2015

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Charles (Charlie) Precourt, Friday, 8-7-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2521-BWB-2015-08-07.mp3

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Guest: Charlie Precourt. Topics: Human spaceflight, SLS-Orion, Mars, Moon, technology & more. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Charlie Precourt back to the show to discuss SLS-Orion progress and milestones, human spaceflight, technology advancement, & much more. During our one segment 63 minute discussion, I first asked out guest about the Orbital ATK merger and business under the combined companies. We soon shifted to the SLS-Orion discussion which included information on the 5 segment solid rocket booster (SRB), tonnage to escape which our guest explained, possible missions, and opportunities that will become available as a result of having this heavy lift rocket available for missions that need the lift & high energy capacity of SLS. We talked about shorter travel times, larger payload mass & volume, plus higher energy transfer orbits using SLS as compared to an EELV. Charlies was asked about SRB safety for human spaceflight. Don’t miss his comments on this issue. He talked at length about the benefits of marrying the SRB for lift out of a gravity well to liquids for propulsion once in space. Our guest provided statistics on SRB launches and uses to support what he was telling us. Charlie also talked about his Space Shuttle flight experience and the Shuttle’s SME, especially when there was an SME problem on one of his shuttle flights. We talked about going BLEO and he introduced us to the concept of One Space. As a result of listener questions, our guest talked about SLS costs, its design for multiple destinations and missions, and the launch “sweet spot” that it would fill. BJohn asked if there were uses for an SRB or solid rocket motor in space. Charlie said for liftoff from a gravity well, yes, but otherwise the SPI for a solid was likely too low for in-space propulsion. I asked our guest about Orbital ATK meeting the SLS -Orion milestones and upcoming flight testing. Jeff from Tucson called in about the use of modern technology including light weight epoxy material for SRBs & other spaceflight hardware. Near the end of the program, I asked Charlie about the justification for HSF to see what he had to say about it. Don’t miss his reply. We then talked about technology challenges in going to Mars, choices that were made to do the shuttle and ISS over deep space missions, and destinations that were still Earth dependent as compared to those being Earth independent such as Mars. Jack emailed in a question based on a show earlier in the week where the guest said that for putting SPS infrastructure in space, SLS was too sophisticated. What was needed was big rockets that had a 2% failure rate as that rocket would be lots cheaper than an SLS. Charlie did not specifically comment on SPS infrastructure but did take issue with the notion that it would be fine to have a rocket with a high failure rate to make it cheaper than something like SLS. Listen to how he explained this. Tell us what you think on TSS blog. As the show was about to end, a listener ask Charlie, based on his F15, Air Force, and test pilot experience, what he thought of the new F35 Joint Strike Fighter and the shortcomings of the new fighter that are reported in the press. Charlie had interesting comments about this so don’t miss them.

 

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above. You can reach Charlie Precourt through The Space Show.

Hannah Kerner, Tuesday, 8-4-15 August 5, 2015

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Hannah Kerner, Tuesday, 8-4-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2520-BWB-2015-08-04.mp3

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Guest: Hannah Kerner; Topics: Hannah’s op-ed “The Space Destination Debate Gets Us Nowhere…Literally,” NewSpace movement. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

 

We welcomed back to the show Hannah Kerner for this 61 minute discussion about here recent space.com op-ed, “The Space Destination Debate Gets Us Nowhere…Literally.” You can read her op-ed at www.space.com/29659-debating-space-destination-is-grounding-exploration.html. Hannah is also the incoming new Executive Director of The Space Frontier Foundation (SFF) so we talked with about her ideas on space advocacy as well as SFF. We started out with a focus on the space destination debate which Hannah said was frustrating, not productive, and helped to create the situation where nobody goes anyplace. She also suggested that regardless of the destination, all space destinations benefit one another. The Stepping Stone Approach was discussed, especially in terms of what makes most sense from both the TRL and economic perspectives. Later in the segment, Hannah talked about the impact of the current go nowhere human spaceflight program on young people or millennials in school and entering the job market. This was a very interesting discussion from the millennial perspective so don’t miss it. As an example, our guest compared career options with NASA to those with companies such as Microsoft, Google, Apple, and other tech giants. We talked about their quick turnaround time with projects as compared to really long space projects, maybe up to a decade or more, with the risk of delays and even cancellation. Using the Europa mission as an example, I asked her how that would be viewed by a person in school wanting to do something important but seeing how long it would take plus the risks of delays or even project cancellation. She talked about devoting one’s career to a life long project like that and how that might be viewed by today’s students and graduates. For the balance of the program, we turned to The Space Frontier Foundation (SFF) and space advocacy in general. Hannah told us about an informal survey SFF conducted at the recent NewSpace Conference asking people how they viewed space players like Russia, China, India, the US, etc., either in terms of tension or innovation. She said 70% of those responding viewed participation by these players as spurring innovation, not adding to national or global tensions. The Linda Billings Scientific American article came up and Hannah gave us a different perspective than we have been hearing. She did not think it was an attack on SFF but rather the author was not that well informed about the Foundation or NewSpace. We then talked about the changes in the Foundation and space advocacy in general, diversity which is improving, the increase of women in the movement, having access to advocacy organizations, ideas, and information. Hannah said the new breed of space entrepreneurs and advocates are not promoting space settlement and issues the way it was promoted in years past which is what Linda was describing. We talked about the diversity among the NewSpace attendees which is vastly improved from the past, especially with women and Asians. In this context, we discussed technology, space settlement, Manifest Destiny, and much more. Hannah indicated that this new group of advocates was looking to establish more collaborative space eco-systems. Listeners emailed Hannah about diversity issues and finding ways to involve more minorities in space advocacy. Space attorney Michael Listner called to talk about advocacy and related issues from his perspective which was different than what Hannah was describing. Don’t miss this discussion. Hannah left us with closing comments you will certainly want to hear.

 

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above. You can reach Hannah through me.

 

 

Dr. Robert Kooima, Friday, 7-10-15 July 11, 2015

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Dr. Robert Kooima, Friday, 7-10-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2504-BWB-2015-07-10.mp3

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Guest: Robert Kooima. Topics: 3D moon & planetary body imaging and rendering. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Robert Kooima to the program to discuss his 3D imaging and software work, especially for the Moon and planetary bodies. Visit his website and www.kooima.net, then click on Applications, then click on Panoptic. This will enable you to follow along with our discussion. In the first segment of our 1 hour 22 minute program, Dr. Kooima started out by telling us how he developed the software he uses for his 3D renderings and images. Note that the software is freely downloadable from his website on the Panoptic page. Also, its Open Source and Dr. Kooima is interested in your feedback if you use it. His email address is on most pages of his website. Keep in mind if you do download the software, you still have to download the database & those are very large files as you will hear toward the end of the first segment. Dr. Kooima shared with us his motivation for doing this, then he explained the pixels and resolution and why the object needed to be spherical. Our guest was asked about side effects using 3D including Oculus Rift and here, our guest had much to say, plus he explained many of the problems by helping us to understand human brain perception. Listeners asked about computer power and faster speeds, latency and rover motion.

In the second segment, our guest told us about his YouTube channel and how to find it. He suggested we watch the “LRO & The Real Time 3D video as well as the “Tour of the Moon on the Oculus Rift.” BJohn wanted to know about the ability to image irregularly shaped objects such as Comet 67P. Be sure to listen to what Robert said about this. Other listeners wanted to know the ease of rendering 3D from the Moon or Mars, then someone asked about using all the radar and other data to create a 3D image of the surface of Venus through the clouds. Our guest talked about the complexities of atmospheric rendering and the fact that Moon had much more data available so it was by far the easiest to render. Dr. Kooima then brought up issues revolving the focus of an object as this is very important to the imaging. Another listener wanted to know if the path to this work was through computer science and graphics or astronomy. You might be surprised by his answer. Our guest also mentioned other software available including the USGS Isis Planetary Image Processing Software and the Celestia Planetary Software. near the end, I asked or guest where this field might be in ten years from now. Don’t miss what e said about the future, the time table, even the investment. Don’t miss his closing comments.

Please post your questions/comments on TSS blog above. You can reach our guest through his email address which is on most pages of his website.

Damian Peach, Sunday, 5-3-15 May 4, 2015

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Damian Peach, Sunday, 5-3-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2466-BWB-2015-05-03.mp3

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Guest:  Damian Peach.   Topics:  Amateur astronomy & imagine, viewing techniques, atmospheric issues & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

 

We welcomed Damian Peach, well known amateur astronomer from the UK to the show.  Visit his website for more information and to see his work, www.damianpeach.com.  During the first segment of our 90 minute program, Damian talked about his early interest in space and the definition for an amateur astronomer. We learned most are self taught as was the case with Damian, that the field was not as math intensive as a professional astronomy career and that amateur astronomers significantly contribute to the field of astronomy and work well in harmony with professional astronomers.  During this segment, listeners had many questions for our guest including asking if he had sponsors, the cost of amateur equipment, his typical viewing schedule on the South Coast of the UK where he lives and his other location, Barbados.  In fact several questions came in about viewing conditions in Barbados and the effect of weather and humidity on his viewing in that location.  Damian likes to photograph Jupiter and Saturn and the bigger outer planets.  Don’t miss the why behind this.  As you will hear and you can see on his website, he has also done lots of excellent imaging of the Moon.  I asked him about his interest in going to Mars, human spaceflight, and more, all of which he said he was interested in.  Other first segment topics included wanting to know more about his techniques, amateur spectroscopy, and amateur peer review.  Regarding his interest in Jupiter, he talked at length about the always changing Jupiter weather that he liked to document in his Jupiter photography.

 

In the second segment, he talked about the upcoming JUNO Mission to Jupiter & the need for amateur astronomers to take images and submit them to the JUNO team.  Other topics in this session included cubesats, amateur astronomy groups in Europe, the U.S. and elsewhere, plus Pluto and New Horizons.  Listeners asked about amateur solar and deep space astronomy, cosmic rays, and more.  Science fiction came up as did the movie Interstellar.  Later, Ben sent in a note while looking at Damian’s Mars images on his website and asked about color enhancing and photo touchups.  Imaging Mercury and Venus came up in the discussion as did light pollution, viewing & searching for comets & NEOs.  Near the end of the program, we talked about Ceres and the Dawn Mission from the amateur perspective.  Near the end, I asked Damian his first choice mission were he the space mission guru.  I bet you will be surprised by what he said.  Dr. Dewar asked about making space access available with space based telescopes through nuclear propulsion given the cost of launch would be so much cheaper. Don’t miss Damian’s response.  Marshall called at the end to talk about technology advancement & more.

 

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Damian Peach through his website or me.

 

Brent Sherwood, Friday, 5-1-15 May 2, 2015

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Brent Sherwood, Friday, 5-1-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2465-BWB-2015-05-01.mp3

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Guest:  Brent Sherwood.  Topics:  Human spaceflight, The year of the dwarf planets, Pluto, Ceres, budget math for space.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back Brent Sherwood for updates to his human spaceflight analysis work previously presented on The Space Show.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 48 minute discussion, Brent started out with a brief discussion on scientific missions and the year 2015 being the Year of the Dwarf Planet.  He talked about the Dawn Mission and Ceres, New Horizons and Pluto, and the oceans on the outer planet moons.  Exoplanets and the habitable zone were also part of this discussion which included an assessment of just how our knowledge has changed regarding the compositing of the solar system.  To redirect the conversation to the purpose of today’s show, human spaceflight (HSF), I asked Brent when we would see HSF beyond LEO (BLEO). I asked about what seemed to be a new space advocacy push for space settlement. Brent then examined why HSF and referred us to his earlier work and the four reasons for HSF which were explore, exploit resources, to experience space, and settlement.  He said settlement was clearly part of the debate, talked about earlier workshops which would avoid the topic and then spoke to the recent Pioneering Space meeting held in Washington, DC where there was a consensus reach for space settlement.  He had good things to say about the meeting and the consensus resolution and talked about the broad space industry representation at the meeting as it was not just NewSpace.  Don’t miss what he had to say about it and space settlement.  Brent was also asked if our National Space Policy Act needed to be amended to reflect space settlement as the official goal of NASA.  Later, he was asked about the stepping stone or incremental approach to HSF development.  He supported this approach, spoke to the challenges for HSF such as life support and more.  As we were closing out the first segment, he offered us valuable insights on this topic so don’t miss what he had to say.

In the second segment, John from Florida called in to ask about grand space visions like an O’Neill orbital colony.  Brent proceeded to discuss grandiose visions in the context of how challenging they were plus their replacement cost.  Here, he used the replacement cost for Manhattan as an example of what he was talking about.  He cited a different type of example, the NASA Ames Space Settlement Contest that had nearly a thousand entries this year from 21 countries with the winner writing a 247 page grand space vision report.  Brent also spoke to the inspiration factor when talking about this contest.  A variety of listener emails were read on air for Brent to respond to, then I asked him if he thought Mars was the Holy Grail for HSF.  He said no so don’t miss why he said that.  He was asked about nuclear propulsion, then we talked about returning to the Moon , cislunar development, and then back to Martian settlement.  He was asked about going to the moons of Mars and he said there were two ways to settle Deimos.  Don’t miss his comments here either.  Near the end of the program, he said the physics of HSF were good but the problem was centered in being grounded in what he called program or budget math.  The budget math for HSF simply does not work, especially for a commercial venture.  He closed on the reality check of being grounded in budget math and the difficulty in going to Mars with humans.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Brent Sherwood through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Dr. John Jurist & Kobi Hudson, Sunday, 4-19-15 April 20, 2015

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Dr. John Jurist & Kobi Hudson, Sunday, 4-19-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2456-BWB-2015-04-19.mp3

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Guests:  Dr. John Jurist, Kobi Hudson.  Topics:  Orbital ATK 5 segment booster test and the ISS Algae experiment.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

 

We welcomed Dr. John Jurist and Kobi Hudson to the program to discuss their recent experiences at the Orbital ATK 5 segment booster test in Utah and the ISS algae experiment Kobi and his teammates are working on at this time.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 58 minute discussion, John and Kobi talked about viewing the Orbital ATK 5 segment booster test this past March in Utah.  John has attended all the 5 segment booster tests but this was the first one for Kobi who is one of John’s students at Rocky Mountain College in Billings, MT.  Kobi described the test, what it looked like and how it felt from the viewing area, the networking opportunities he had with those attending the test including many executives from across our aerospace industry & NASA.  I asked John and Kobi if they sensed that the Orbital ATK team was aware of the controversy surrounding the final destination for the booster, SLS.  We talked about this for several minutes.  I think you will find what both John and Kobi had to say about this to be very interesting.  This discussion took us into an SLS discussion but from a slightly different perspective than our usual Space Show SLS discussions.  A listener asked our guests if either of them noticed a cultural difference in the test team given the Orbital and ATK merger.  Kobi was asked if the test and the experience inspired him to want to work in the aerospace field which it did.

 

In the second segment, Marshall called to inquire about the use of liquid rocket motors as compared to solids and wanted to know which type was more efficient. Both John and Marshall seemed to agree that it might depend on which type of propulsion system gets more launches and usage though the solids are far simpler.  As part of this discussion, the political dimensions of decision making were brought up as they play a role in the propulsion system and thus influence efficiencies.  Next, we turned to Kobi to explain to us the algae experiment he and others are working and which will fly to the ISS on the SpaceX 7 launch.  Behind this experiment is the goal of testing how well algae grows and how much carbon dioxide it consumes in a zero-gravity environment.  They want to see if it can influence the presence of oxygen in the spaceship.  The algae is grown in an agar solid media.  Kobi went into details on this experiment which I believe you will find of interest. When the team gets the data back from the 28 day test, Kobi will come back to the show to update us on what they found out.  Later in the segment, SLS John called in to follow up on our earlier SLS conversation and the proposed NASA ARM.  Several listener questions came in by email regarding both the issue of solids vs. liquids and the algae experiment.  Kobi also got a question or two about this work on the Firebird cubesat program.  He said it used a polar orbit , was then asked if cubesats could go to the Moon or elsewhere and he said probably but challenging. Doug called to talk closed loop life support and related issues.  The last question came from a high school senior asking Kobi about the need to attend a Tier One school and the consequences for going to a school not as well known and not as highly ranked.  All three of us, Kobi, myself, and John responded to this question saying about the same thing but in different words.  Both John and Kobi offered concluding comments you don’t want to miss.

 

Please post your comments and questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach both guests through me.

 

 

Dr. Erik Conway, Monday, 4-13-15 April 14, 2015

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Dr. Erik Conway

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2452-BWB-2015-04-13.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Erik Conway.  Topics:  Dr. Conway’s book, “Exploration and Engineering: The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Quest for Mars”  & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Erik Conway to the show to discuss his new book, “Exploration and Engineering: The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Quest for Mars,” JPL history, engineering, Mars missions, and much more all from the historical perspective.  In the first segment of our 1 hour 28 minute discussion, I asked Dr. Conway how JPL engineers did things that led to major Mars exploration breakthroughs.  He cited the Mars Pathfinder mission as an example and the decision to use airbags for the landing.  Dr. Conway took us through the process, the cost benefit analysis of the decision and the role played by budgets, the engineers, policy makers, and others contributing to the mission.  Our guest provided us with other examples as well from other Mars projects and missions.  Listeners asked our guest about human missions.  Here, Dr. Conway had much to say throughout our discussion focusing on the fact that humans are dirty with bacteria, planetary protection is a priority, and there is zero risk or near zero risk for a human mission.  When asked if the Moon required the same planetary protection policies as Mars, he said no though in the early days of lunar exploration, it did.  I asked our guest about the roles played by policy makers and engineers and this resulted is a very interesting discussion. Don’t miss it.  Listener Barbara in Seattle asked our guest about Curiosity cost overruns and how that would be reported on in history.  This led to a discussion about the impact of management and others on the initial design and budgets.  Later, Dr. Conway was asked why JPL had a focus on Mars in the first place.  Doug called in to ask about the humans vs. robot debate for science.  Don’t miss the response to this question by our guest.  Doug also brought up the issue of finding past or present life on Mars and what that might mean for future  Mars missions.  Dr. Conway agreed that probably all sides in the argument of avoiding Mars to avoid contaminating and disturbing life to the opposite perspective will be arguing the issues for a long time to come.  Dr. Conway addressed commercialization and while supporting reduced launch costs said the cost reduction needed to be magnitudes lower than even the lower costs of today.  Dwayne called and addressed planetary protection, then he turned his attention toward asking about the research opportunities at JPL for outside historical researchers.  Erik explained why these opportunities were limited, partly holding ITAR responsible.

In the second segment, Erik talked about the risk versus return on the costs.  He talked about there being almost zero tolerance for accidents and losses with Mars missions and human missions.  He also said the zero risk tolerance for these missions has been a significant cost driver.  Our guest had much to say on this subject with regards to Mars so don’t miss it as it covered most of the second segment. Later in this segment, Jake inquired about the early JPL history and its founders and their impact on the JPL of today.  Penny wanted to know about the Cal Tech-JPL relationship.  Dwayne sent in an email asking about the Faster, Better, Cheaper programs and what happened with the JPL programs using this approach.  This was an interesting way to wind up the show. As we were ending we learned that Goddard has no historian so their programs are not being recorded or document.  I sked Erik the difference in JPL and the APL.  Note how he explained the difference between the two labs, their risk tolerance, and decision process.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Dr. Conway through JPL or me.

Dr. Bruce Damer, Tuesday, 3-31-15 April 1, 2015

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Dr. Bruce Damer, Tuesday, 3-31-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2445-BWB-2015-03-31.mp3

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Guest: Dr. Bruce Damer. Topics: The Shepherd concept for asteroids/icy planetesimals as a possible stepping stone for sustainable human spaceflight. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Bruce Damer back to the show to discuss his new concept for enclosing an asteroid with a Xenon gas filled enclosure, the Shepherd concept, to help make human spaceflight sustainable. During the first segment of our 83 minute program, Dr. Damer introduced us to the concept, compared it to the NASA ARM baggie option as well as the boulder option, plus the private sector potential for the mission even without NASA. You can read the paper we talked about during the show which was recently published in New Space, “Shepherd: A Concept for Gentle Asteroid Retrieval with a Gas-Filled Enclosure” at http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/space.2014.0024. During this segment, Dr. Damer talked about capturing fuel in space and talked about a demo project, possibly in LEO. Doug emailed in several questions and comments about the NASA ARM video, then asking if Dr. Damer’s idea could be used to extract the most valuable volatile thus only having to bring back a portion of the asteroid. Don’t miss what Bruce had to say in response to Doug’s comments and questions. Claire in Boston emailed in to voice her unhappiness with ARM and the fact that many others like her did not like the mission. She asked Bruce what the value was even with his idea rather than using the resources for returning to the Moon or going to Mars. Bruce suggested the mission would produce excellent science and enhance commercial spaceflight. Again, don’t miss his full answer to Claire’s question. One of the later topics in this segment dealt with forces on the asteroid in the baggie concept that could possibly destroy the asteroid. He explained why Shepherd would probably be different.

In the second segment, Dr. Damer talked about the Shepherd mining variant, the Shepherd biological variant, and the Shepherd fuel variant. I asked him if this was similar to 3D printing in space and he said it was, then he explained his answer. He also said the founders of the Shepherd idea were putting it out to everyone as Open Source as he said would be valuable to give it away to industry. Later he said the most likely to develop this technology would be NewSpace entrepreneurs. Jim in Denver emailed in about the applicability of Shepherd to human spaceflight to Mars. Here, Bruce talked about orbiting Shepherd models supplying the surface group below. He also said being on the surface may not be the best way to set up a settlement but listen to the total scope of his comments on this subject. He even cited Von Braun, Bonestell, Willy Ley and others for depicting this idea using a Mars transfer orbit. Tim called in with several questions about short period asteroid. When asked for concluding comments, Bruce said he was very excited about Shepherd as it represented 35 years of simulation and other work and now he was meeting with the right people with the right skills to make a project like this happen.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above. You can reach Dr. Damer through me.

 

Dr. Arlin Crotts, Monday, 2-16-15 February 17, 2015

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Dr. Arlin Crotts, Monday, 2-16-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2416-BWB-2015-02-16.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Arlin Crotts.  Topics:  Lunar exploration, commerce, & human development in addition to many related topics.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Arlin Crotts back to the show to discuss his new book, “The New Moon: Water, Exploration, and Future Habitation” plus lunar related science and development issues & concerns. For more information, visit Dr. Crotts website, http://user.astro.columbia.edu/~arlin/research.html.  In the first segment of our 93 minute program, I asked Dr. Crotts to summarize lunar science and development progress since his last appearance on TSS, Oct. 27, 2009 through today.  Dr. Crotts had much say in this summary, especially with lunar water, hydroxyls, minerals, LCROSS, volatiles, and more.  Don’t miss this summary. Listeners asked many questions about INSITU Resource Utilization on the Moon, polar ice, water ice, volatiles, fuel possibilities, and more.  I asked if he had detected an increase in the public’s awareness of the Moon and many of these issues plus I wanted his thoughts on the private sector commercial opportunities and plans opening up for the Moon.  The balance of this segment featured calls and listeners emails asking about the lunar poles, volatiles, craters & the Resolve Mission.

In the second segment, Dr. Crotts was asked about the Lunar Mission One Kickstarter project and their wanting to drill 100m into the Moon.  Dr. Crotts did not comment on the project but did talk about why we needed more and deeper lunar drilling exploration.  Our guest also talked about his book in detail in this segment, saying it was very detailed, well documented and supported, and that readers would learn things about the Moon not previously known or written about given his access to original lunar exploration and Apollo documents.  Other topics in this segment addressed humans to Mars or the moons of Mars, the timing of human lunar settlement which he supported but not until we know much more about the Moon to do it safely and correctly.  We talked about this approach in some detail.  Space settlement was discussed and he said it would happen sooner or later but that we needed more lunar science first before we settled the Moon.  Near the end of the segment, Dr. Crotts was asked about NASA’s ARM project.  Space mining came up and then just before the program ended, Eric inquired about Transit Lunar Phenomena (see http://user.astro.columbia.edu/~arlin/TLP).  Tim was our last caller asking about the use of RTGs.  Dr. Crotts talked about reactors on the Moon and mentioned the smaller Toshiba 4G reactor.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Dr. Crotts through his website or me.

Dr. Edgar Bering, Friday, 1-30-15 January 31, 2015

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Dr. Edgar Bering, Friday, 1-30-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2404-BWB-2015-01-30.mp3

Your Amazon Purchases Helps Support TSS/OGLF (see www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm)

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Guest:  Dr. Edgar Bering; Topics:  “Mars Rover Model Celebration and Competition,” Dr. Bering’s undergraduate student balloon projects, cubesat project to Mars.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Edgar Bering  to the show to discuss the “Mars Rover Model Celebration and Competition ” and his undergraduate student balloon projects to study the Northern Lights and more.  During our one segment one hour program, we focused the first half on the Mars Rover Celebration aimed at both elementary and middle school students while in the second part of the segment, we talked about Dr. Bering’s balloon projects and even a possible cubesat to Mars project.  Dr. Bering explained the Mars Rover Model competition which has the students doing a six week Mars course in preparation for their rover mock-ups.  You can learn more about this competition at their website, http://marsrover.phys.uh.edu/about.php.  Dr. Bering took us through the requirements, differences in the competition for the elementary school students compared to the middle school students and he even responded to a question as to how to get a six week Mars curriculum into the school program.  He said the rover categories included a free form model rover made of “stuff” plus a solar power model, and for the older students a radio controlled model made from the parts of an RC model car.  Our guest would asked if the model rover program would work for going to the Moon, not just Mars.  He said yes but don’t miss his full reply.

In the second half of our segment, we talked about his high altitude undergraduate student balloon projects to study the Northern Lights and its effect on the upper atmosphere.  He will be taking his students to Alaska to  see the Northern Lights and to conduct the balloon studies.  He talked about the significant improvements in miniaturizing with the needed electronics, sensors, and cameras, plus today’s high reliability of these components.  He point out that instruments capable of doing the work of today’s instruments would have weighed around 120 lbs. in previous years.  Now they are shooting for a total mass for the instruments of less than 6 lbs for doing meaningful science.  In 1985, the ultra-lute instrument package would have been 50 lbs.  Dr. Bering was asked if his students did cubesat projects and he told us about a possible Mars cubesat project.  He was confident they could get telemetry back from Mars with a cubesat and talked about new antenna improvements.  Toward the end of our discussion I asked if he had any stats on students doing these programs from elementary and middle school and if they went on to careers in space, science, etc.  Don’t miss his response.

Please post your comments on TSS blog above.  You can reach Dr. Bering through the Mars Model Rover website or me.

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