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Dr. Madhu Thangavelu, Friday, 6-7-13 June 8, 2013

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Dr. Madhu Thangavelu, Friday, 6-7-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2024-BWB-2013-06-07.mp3

Guest:  Dr. Madhu Thangavelu.  Topics:  space architecture visionary design, Human Spaceflight (HSF) to Mars, radiation, much more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We welcomed back Dr. Madhu Thangavelu for a 1 hour 45 minute discussion on a wide ranging set of topics from space visionary concepts to HSF to Mars, radiation and other issues, fantasy vs. reality thinking, and the synthetic mind. Madhu provided us with these links relevant to our discussion:  1. AIAA talk slides:
https://info.aiaa.org/Regions/Western/LA/Lists/Presentations/DispForm.aspx?ID=6 ; 2. AIAA Space Architecture panel video on YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=ig3FzB0bQnA, 3. USC Space Concepts Studio website : http://denecs.usc.edu/hosted/ASTE/527_20111, 4. latest USC Eng. magazine carries an article, p16-17: http://viterbistorage.usc.edu/Public/USCVITERBIMAG.pdf.  In our first segment, Madhu opened up by talking about students and space inspiration.  Based on his own USC teaching experience, he said students were fired up.  Our guest was asked to compare robotic missions to HSF missions and Madhu spent some time on this discussion.  He also talked about the NASA plan to capture an asteroid, referring to this as a possible wild goose chase.  He talked about the ISS and using it more and more to accomplish important space goal.  Madhu received several questions about Tito’s Inspiration Mars flyby mission.  Here, he had much to say, especially about radiation, deep space communications, food & nutrition, and even physiology degradation.  We talked about using nuclear propulsion for such a mission & he suggested a better mission profile using two Falcon rockets.

In the second segment, Paul asked about using nuclear electric propulsion as compared to the two Falcon rocket idea. Madhu talked about the nuclear propulsion history with NERVA & the use of nuclear fuel on many of our robotic missions. Michael called in and said there was no real political will for nuclear so it probably would not happen anytime soon.  Later, Madhu was asked many specific radiation questions regarding the Mars flight.  Madhu suggested possible mitigation strategies, including his favorite, self cellular repair.  Allison emailed in to inquire about his Studio students and how he holds the line from reality thinking as compared to Kool Aid thinking.  Madhu talked extensively about this issue, discussed the philosophy of idea generation, visionary thinking with some fantasy while at the same time being grounded in engineering, physics, financial and other subcomponents of the concept. Don’t miss this important discussion.  We also talked about disruptive technologies.  At the end, we talked about the synthetic mind.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  You can contact Madhu through me.

Michael Listner, Monday, 5-6-13 May 6, 2013

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Michael Listner, Monday, 5-6-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2003-BWB-2013-05-06.mp3

Guest:  Michael Listner.  Topics:  Space debris issues and ideas for solutions.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We welcomed Michael Listner back to the program to discuss space debris and Apollo artifact issues along with his ideas for possible solutions to the debris problem.  On The Space Show blog, you will find three of Michael’s Space Review articles on the subject plus his Power Point slide presentation at the end of the blog summary statement.  In addition, Michael had an article in the current Space Review on the preservation of Apollo historic sites. For this article, see www.thespacereview.com/article/2290/1.  In the first segment of our 1 hour 44 minute show, Michael offered us his definition of space debris and pointed us to his slides which I urge you to have available when listening to this show. Again, his slide presentation is uploaded to the blog for this program and is the last item of the uploads.  He summarized the space debris issue as both legal and thorny!  After defining debris and the issues using the first few of his slides, he talked about other issues including ITAR, property rights, technical, and even national security issues.  Listeners asked him several questions, mostly focused on LEO as that is the most crowded region at this time and the priority for debris mitigation.  CubeSat issues came up given the potential debris problem should the cubesats manifest in the quantity talked about and planned.  We talked policy issues and different strategies as suggested by China and Russia.  We also talked about weapons issues and dual use for the military as well as for civilian use.  Michael went over Transparency Confidence Measures (TCMs) instead of new treaties and mentioned the proposed Russian/Chinese treaty, PPWT, which does not have wide support in the UN.  Late in the segment, Michael talked about the OST and the definition of a space object. We also talked about space salvage compared to ocean salvage. He told us to check out Project Azorian www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/nukevault/ebb305) (but did not tell us what this was.

In our second segment, Michael wanted to focus on solutions & he offered us some of his ideas on the subject. Still referring to his PPT slides.  One suggestion was to offer limited liability to third parties or those working to mitigate a debris issue, similar to what many of the commercial spaceports are doing with the suborbital spaceship companies and manufacturers.  He talked quite a bit about the proposed Swiss concept for debris mitigation which he liked very much. Michael wrote another Space Review article on this concept last year which you can read at http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2032/1.  Toward the end of the program, we talked about the need to preserve the Apollo landing sites as historical sites and some of the issues and challenged faced in doing so.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog. Michael can also be contacted at michael.listner at spacesafetymagazine dot com.

Legal issues surrounding space debris remediation

Addressing the challenges of space debris, part 1: defining space debris

Addressing the challenges of space debris, part 2: liability

Addressing the challenges of space debris, part 3: policy

Listner_Space_Debris_Removal_Corrected

The John Batchelor Show “Hotel Mars,” Wednesday, 4-10-13 April 11, 2013

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The John Batchelor Show “Hotel Mars,” Wednesday, 4-10-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1992-BWB-2013-04-10.mp3

Guests:  John Batchelor, Dr. Don Kessler, Dr. David Livingston:  Topics:  Space debris and mitigation issues.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We do not permit the commercial use of any Space Show program or part thereof, nor do we permit Space Show programs to be edited, placed on YouTube, or other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted in news articles, papers, academic & research work but must be cited or referenced in the proper citation format. Contact Dr. Livingston for questions about our copyright and trademark policies which we do enforce.  This program is archived on The Space Show website, podcasting, and blog sites with permission from John Batchelor. Please visit the John Batchelor Show website for more information about this fine program, www.johnbatchelorshow.com.

During our 11 minute plus discussion with Dr. Don Kessler, we talked about space and orbital debris problems, the most crowded orbits, mitigation theories and applications, plus international support in dealing with the problems cause over our global space development history.  We talked about specific mitigation techniques including tethers and the Swiss proposal.  When asked what the biggest problem was in terms of finding a solution, Dr. Kessler suggested funding issues.  John asked our guest to define and talk to us about the Kessler Syndrome so don’t miss that part of our discussion.  We also talked about the role of private & commercial space in both creating more debris and in helping to clean up debris problems.

Please post any comments/questions you might have on The Space Show blog.  You can contact any of  us through drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Wayne White, Sunday, 3-3-13 March 4, 2013

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Wayne White, Sunday, 3-3-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1962-BWB-2013-03-03.mp3

Guest:  Wayne White.  Topics:  Space real property rights, salvage law and mining law issues.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We welcomed back Wayne White, noted space attorney, for an excellent discussion on real space property rights, space salvage law & space mining law.  Given the amount of email and listener calls during the program, we went to  2.5 hours! Wayne started us out with about a 20 plus minute overview of space and related property rights today, the governing U.N. treaties, & the problems ambiguity causes in the financial and investment worlds. He also gave us good working definitions for both common law and natural law.  He spent some time discussing this in terms of establishing property rights in space.  This discussion included territorial property rights stemming from sovereignty as well.  I believe Wayne’s introduction to the subject was most useful in giving us the basic understanding of the issues so we could move forward with our discussion in the program to possible solutions and why some possible solutions would not work.  After Wayne finished his introduction, I offered some challenges to his assumptions and we fielded several listener emails and a call from Marshall.  My assumption challenges were based on a different outcome for private sector financial & economic growth & investment should governments continue with economic problems or face a much worse set of economic conditions than we see today.

In the second segment, we talked orbital debris and mitigation issues, the reality of satellite service and much more. Wayne also cited the Nimitz law suit against NASA for parking fees re asteroid 433EROS as evidence that the courts need a property right legal format to even hear such cases.  He also mentioned one of Rand Simberg’ s recent property rights ideas around the Space Settlement Prize Act.  Wayne went into details as to why in his legal opinion, this idea would not work.  We talked about the U.N. treaties, benefit sharing per the U.N. treaties as being part of the property rights issue, and the idea of establishing a legal Authority for issuing property rights.  Listen to why Wayne was not enthusiastic about any of these suggestions or alternative ideas.  Near the end, Bethany sent in the question I referred to in my earlier comments in that she suggested the resolution re space property rights rests with the companies that want to go to space for commercial purposes and need property rights for their businesses  That in fact, it was not our responsibility to do this as the responsibility belonged to those wanting to commercially operate and profit through space commerce.  We discussed Bethany’s question & Wayne agree with her. We talked about company lobbying & other things they could do to influence policy makers.  Our last call came in under the wire from Charles to suggest Antarctica as a model for space property rights.  Wayne explained why that was not a good model.  At the end, Wayne suggested some actions for space enthusiasts interested in this issue.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog. You can email Wayne White at wnwhite@sbcglobal.net.

Dr. James (Jim) Wertz, Monday, 2-11-13 February 12, 2013

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Dr. James (Jim) Wertz, Monday, 2-11-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1948-BWB-2013-02-11.mp3

Guest:  Dr. James (Jim) Wertz:  Topics:  Methods for dramatically reducing space mission costs, schedules, & launches.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

     We welcomed Dr. Jim Wertz, President of Microcosm, back to the show to discuss various methods & tools for reducing total space mission costs.  Our guest talked about successful programs and tools that have so far contributed to total mission cost reduction.  In the first segment of our 1 hour 33 minute program, Dr. Wertz started by defining what he meant by reinventing space.  He said this refers to a dramatic reduction in total space mission costs by a factor of 2::10 for schedule related reductions and 2-5 times for space access related costs.  Early on he was asked about reducing costs by increasing the launch rate, a common argument heard in various sectors of the space industry.  His response might surprise you.  Dr. Wertz cited examples to support his comments, specifically Surrey Satellite in the UK (SSTL) as they have been reducing costs successfully for 25 years.  He said modern technology must be used. He also pointed us to his Reinventing Space Project with the USC Astronautics Department.  Also, he pointed us to these websites for more information, www.smad.com/ie/ieframessr2.html and www.smad.com/ReinventingSpace.html.  Dr. Wertz mentioned disaggregation regarding the military using smaller spacecraft and different orbits.  He was asked about cubesats and cubesat launchers, the Scorpius launch vehicle, and NanoEye.  Jim offered sequestration and budgetary comments and pointed out the difficulty in mission planning and more when the nation continues to operate on CR rather than a budget.  He talked about the potential seriousness of the sequestration cuts.  In response to questions about the private sector and SAA type agreements, he pointed out that they exclude the smaller, more creative and innovative cutting edge companies as they are often unable to contribute the required financial portion of the agreement.  Jim pointed out that the goal was to reduce total mission costs, not just launch costs. He said that the launch cost was not always the most costly component of the mission.  As the segment ended, he talked about emergency response and the need for a rapid response, something that is today unavailable.

    In the second segment, we talked about the Cassini Resource Exchange as an effective policy that reduced mission costs and enabled an on time project.  Don’t miss the details about this program.  He again talked about SSTL and pointed out that their attitude is what makes them special & so good.  SSTL has pride in reducing mission costs. We don’t have such pride.  Dr. Wertz talked about Trading on Requirements and why it is risky.  During the first segment, fuel depots were offered up as a possible way to reduce mission costs but Dr. Wertz put them in the marginal category. During this segment, listeners had lots of questions about fuel depots.  In fact, it was as if they cared more about their vision and beliefs regarding fuel depots than the overall message Dr. Wertz was putting out. Clearly fuel depots have the attention of space enthusiasts & sectors of the industry no matter what.  A listener also asked about advanced propulsion concepts as represented by several companies pushing very advanced designs.  Dr. Wertz mentioned that the amateur satellite network could be used to reduce mission costs and talked about the success of AMSAT.  More listener questions came in regarding fuel depots, by far the most common discussion and question topic of the day.  Jim talked about future programs that may offer economies of scale such as SSP.  The last questions came in from Tim regarding our discussion of using pressure fed systems over the use of systems with a turbo pump.  He also wanted to know about rocket reusability.  Jim’s answers may again surprise you.

     Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  You can email Dr. Wertz through me using drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Zac Manchester, Tuesday, 2-5-13 February 6, 2013

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Zac Manchester, Tuesday, 2-5-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1944-BWB-2013-02-05.mp3

Guest:  Zac Manchester.  Topics:  Zac’s KickSat project, cubesats, crowd-funding, & more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

    We welcomed Zac Manchester to the program to discuss his KickSat CubeSat open source mission using 200 Sprite ChipSats.  You can learn more by visiting www.kicksat.net, www.spacecraftresearch.com and http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/251588730/kicksat-your-personal-spacecraft-in-space.  From these websites you can visit the KickSat wiki as well as the KickSat blog.  We started our discussion with Zac Manchester with his providing us with an overview of his KickSat project and Kickstarter as a tool to fund some types of space ventures.  Zac talked about launches being provided by the NASA Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (/ELaNa) program plus the lack of traditional financing which caused Zac to give Kickstarter a try.  The KickSat team started out wanting to raise $30,000 but instead raised nearly $75,000.  He had much to say throughout both segments regarding crowd-funding and the use of Kickstarter.  Zac also described the cubesats and the Sprite ChipSats.  He talked about the importance of reducing the size of the unit and what this meant for mission design, propulsion, technology advancement, lower launch costs, and more.  Several listeners emailed him questions including space debris questions since the 200 Sprite ChipSats would have a short life expectancy and then return to Earth.  He said all would burn up in the atmosphere but he also talked about future missions where the units would float back to Earth as would a piece of paper. Technology advancement for this to happen must take place but he said it was certainly plausible.  Other issues discussed in our first segment included secondary payments and payload integration.  Regarding payload integration, he said their project goes to Cal Poly for peapod integration and then to the Cape from Cal Poly for vehicle integration.  Cal Poly does the peapod integration for academic cubesat projects.  A listener saw the project plans on one of the websites and inquired about making the hardware or buying a kit from Zac’s group.  As you will hear, the project is open source and people are encouraged to buy the off the shelf parts and make their own unit.  Zac mentioned several online stores where the parts could be bought.  We talked about the difficulty in getting a launch for a stand alone cubesat someone might build.

     In the second segment, we took a call from Charles Pooley who talked about building a small launchers to get away from secondary payloads and potential launch delays we he said were the barriers to this industry. Check out www.microlaunchers.com for more on the Pooley idea. Zac then told us about the March 16 workshop at the Hacker Dojo in Silicon Valley on how to set up KickSat ground stations.  Zac described the ground station using Ham bands and suggested the cost would be around $200.00.  Another listener asked Zac for his background & how he got interested in space & a cubesat project.  Zac had much to say about the academic research that inspired him as both a Cornell undergrad and masters student.

      Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  You can contact Zac through his project websites and blog.

Alan Steinberg, Friday, 2-1-13 February 2, 2013

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Alan Steinberg, Friday, 2-1-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1941-BWB-2013-02-01.mp3

Guest:  Alan Steinberg.  Topics;  Protecting our space assets, weapons in space, space policy and public opinion.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.  We welcomed Alan Steinberg to the program to discuss both is latest Astropolitics article, “Weapons in Space: The Need to Protect Space Assets,” and his 2011 Space Policy article, , “Space policy responsiveness: The relationship between public opinion and NASA funding.”  Both of these articles are available for purchase by using Google the full title of the article.  During the first half of the program, we focused on Alan’s Astropolitics article.  As you will hear, the issue of protecting our space assets is not an easy one to address or solve.  Furthermore, as Alan and listeners suggested, the response the U.S. might make to an attack on space assets is unclear, especially if the attacking party or nation had an excuse, said it was an accident, or denied intentionally doing the deed.  Alan and listener Michael defined the term space weapon and Michael provided us with the PPWT proposed treaty language defining space weapons.  Alan had much to say about protecting space assets and weapons in space in the context of the U.N. treaties.  We talked about U.S. as well as international enforcement here and in other countries.  Space debris was discussed, especially in light of the difficulty in diplomatic action leading to tangible action against a debris causing country or party.  Also discussed was government being responsible for commercial space assets under its flag.

     In the second segment, we mostly talked about Alan’s 2011 Space Policy article, “Space policy responsiveness: The relationship between public opinion and NASA funding,” although many listeners via email and the phone kept returning to the space weapons topic.  Alan took lots of questions about the role and impact on policy of space advocacy and as you will hear, its not easy or clear to pin down.  Alan had much to say on how best to influence members of congress but was clear in pointing out that space advocacy does not have the numbers of the larger and more powerful lobbying groups that are far more effective in influencing policy than is the space community.  Another of his points focused in on the significant influence of the aerospace industry as compared to space advocates and enthusiasts.  We also learned from his concluding paragraph that when researching this issue, “research on what influences space policy attitudes and even space policy public opinion is in short supply.” In addition, we learned that while Americans like our space program and NASA, they don’t have a good understanding of it, the actual amount of funding NASA gets in relationship to the budget, and that their liking of the space program simply does not translate to more funding and more programs.

     Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  If you want to contact Alan Steinberg, you can do so through drspace@thespaceshow.com.

Jim Keravala, Shackleton Energy Co., Friday, 12-14-12 December 15, 2012

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Jim Keravala, Shackleton Energy Co., Friday, 12-14-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1914-BWB-2012-12-14.mp3

Guest:  Jim Keravala.  Topics:  Shackleton Energy’s cislunar economic development plans.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. We welcomed Jim Keravala to the program to talk with us about the Cislunar development plans for Shackleton Energy.  To learn more, visit their website at www.shackletonenergy.com. Jim started our discussion with an overview of Shackleton Energy and their Cislunar development plan.  As you will hear throughout our discussion, the plan involves the propellant depots near the ISS and in other locations, water ice development at the lunar north and south pole, the use of insitu resources and eventually Shackleton industrial astronauts.  Our guest spent most of the first segment describing the plan, the various stages of development, the use of robotic technology leading up to human spaceflight and benefit sharing ideas.  He talked about being able to solve or at least significantly contribute to solutions to our global energy usage problems which he said would be around 30 terawatt hours(TWh).  He talked about the viability of SSP at that point based on the cislunar Shackleton Energy development program. Jim also mentioned the risk of reaching the Kessler limits regarding space debris.  Ben sent in an email asking Jim for his thoughts on benefit sharing, a subject put forth on The Space Show by recent guest Dr. Edythe Weeks.  Jim was supportive of benefit sharing through technology exchanges and transfers as well as in helping under developed nations build an industry to allow them to compete and have a presence in the expanding space industry.  He cited his work with Surrey Satellite Company and their African space development program as an example, plus he talked about sharing to make sure everyone benefitted from space development which could significantly improve life in these countries.  We talked about government corruption problems and ITAR as issues that might get in the way of benefit sharing, but Jim was steadfast in the need to reach out to third world countries to engage them in space development for the commercial and industrial benefits.
     In our second segment, Doug called to ask about transitioning from telerobotic missions to human missions.  Here, Jim did a comprehensive explanation of the different phases of their development plan leading up to industrial astronauts in cislunar space. He talked about trades with humans based at EML1 as compared to the lunar surface regarding repair and maintenance missions of lunar surface hardware.  Charles wanted to know about their choice of launch vehicles.  Jim also got questions about their timeline and capital acquisition plans.  Randy wanted to know if they would be able to meet the 2020 timeline referenced in their website video.  Near the end, Jim got questions about the requirements for becoming an industrial astronaut.  In summary, Jim talked about their ambitious project, TRLs, and the importance of the project from many different perspectives.
      Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog. If you want to email Jim Keravala, you can do so through me.

Michael Listner, Tuesday, 11-27-12 November 28, 2012

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Michael Listner, Tuesday, 11-27-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1902-BWB-2012-11-27.mp3

Guest:  Michael Listner.  Topics:  Space law & policy review for 2012.  Please direct all comments & questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments & questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright & are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. We welcomed Michael Listner back to the show to do our first ever annual review of space law issues. Michael had several topics to discuss including the Code of  Contact, Transparency & Confidence-Building Measures (TCBMs), Cube sat regulation, ITAR, Planetary resources & space property rights, Space debris with an emphasis on EnviSat, Austria’s space law in particular the launch of Austria’s first satellite in December, Commercial space in particular limited liability laws, Delineation of air space & outer space, the Moon Treaty & the ascension of Turkey & Saudi Arabia, Rules of Arbitration, & the preservation of Apollo landing sites.  We started with two main space law issues of 2012, the European Code of Conduct & TCBMs.  Michael did a good job explaining the history of these items, where are today with them & what is likely to happen with them in 2013.  We also talked about space taking on the role of being normal & we both pointed out ways in which it interacts with regular law even if consumers are behind a firewall & have no awareness of space law issues.  Our discussion turned toward benefit sharing & this took us into an extensive Moon Treaty discussion. I urge people not blow off what to many of us are radical departures from how we have been conducting space affairs & how we want to see commercial space evolve.  There are longer term potential risks given trends in benefit sharing, more countries signing on to the Moon Treaty, & even listener feedback I get right here on The Space Show.  Michael urged us to pay attention if other nations sign the Moon Treaty, particularly if Russia or China agree to it.  Michael talked about legal theories that can make the Moon Treaty enforceable given it is a legal treaty, even if the U.S. & others do not sign it.  Again, I urge our audience to not discount this potential longer term risk.
     In the second segment, Michael talked about the issue of just where space starts.  He mentioned two theories on this & why it is an important issue. The U.S. position tends to discount the debate & operates as if the 100km point is the edge of space.  It appears we abstain from the debate with the opinion it is a settled issue but evidently not in some circles as it is a hot button issue.  We also talked about the limited liability laws for suborbital space, especially in New Mexico which is having a problem accepting it in its legislature.  We mentioned the potential impact limited liability might have on Spaceport America so it deserves watching.  Michael talked about cubesat regulation & an upcoming European conference on that subject.  He said it is something we need to be carefully watching.  ITAR reform, especially in terms of getting satellites off the munitions list to the dual technology list was also a key issue for the year & will be next year.  We also talked about space debris issues & the impact of ESA’s EnviSat.  As our program was ending, I asked Michael for some future 2013 assessments of hot button issues.  Among those he mentioned included the Code, TCBMs, ITAR, possibly the Moon Treaty & Planetary Resources types of issues.  A listener asked about our withdrawal from the OST but Michael did not think that would mean much. Our last topic dealt with the historical preservation of the Apollo 11 & 17 landing sites.
    Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email Michael at michael@spacelawsolutions.com.

Brad Blair, Tuesday, 10-23-12 October 24, 2012

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Brad Blair, Tuesday, 10-23-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1879-BWB-2012-10-23.mp3

Guest: Brad Blair.  Topics:  Space debris mitigation ideas, space governance, space mining, ISRU, plus other topics.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We do not permit the commercial use of any Space Show program or part thereof, nor do we permit Space Show programs to be edited, placed on YouTube, or other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted in news articles, papers, academic & research work, but must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact Dr. Livingston for questions about our copyright and trademark policies. We welcomed Brad Blair back to the program to discuss several issues including a law suit against governments per the Liability Convention to create a super fund to use in mitigating space debris.  Other topics included space mining, ISRU development, HSF to Mars, Cislunar development, the Red Bull Stratos jump, space skydiving, the NIAC-RAP (Robotic Asteroid Prospector Project), and more.  During the first segment of our two hour discussion, Brad focused on the space debris lawsuit. He explained the concept, the state liability issues in the Liability Convention, the idea of creating a superfund, and practical issues in doing this.  He suggested interested parties talk to space attorney Declan O’Donnell for more information.  Declan, a frequent Space Show guest, can be contacted using isdac.usis@gmail.com or 1-800-632-2828.  We fielded many listeners questions and phone calls about the lawsuit & superfund idea, some of which continued into the second segment.  Brad talked about large and small debris removal issues, mostly in LEO, and he suggested the use of Earth-based lasers as a debris removal tool.  We also talked about space salvage & the use of a bidding system for private companies to remove & possibly recycle space debris.  As we neared the end of the segment, Doug asked about Lunar ISRU, either excavating or using explosives on the Moon, and mining tools such as the slusher bucket.

Our second segment started off with Brad talking about space mining & the use of space resources. He then talked about his NIAC RAP project.  A caller asked him why the taxpayers should fund space debris cleanup per his lawsuit idea.  You will want to hear this discussion.  We got several emails and a call from Spike regarding debris and mining issues.  Next, Brad talked about commercial markets and market development for space projects.  He also talked about the potential of 3D printing and said many times that we are at a tipping point for commercial space development. He talked about space visions for space settlement and development.  Doug called back to ask about his space skydiving ideas using a rocket instead of a balloon.  At the program’s end, he told us about his venture, NewSpace Analytics, LLC.

Post your comments/questions on The Space Show Blog.  Brad can be reached @ newspaceanalytics@gmail.com.