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Leonard David, Scott Sacknoff, Monday, 11-9-15 November 10, 2015

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Leonard David, Scott Sacknoff, Monday, 11-9-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2582-BWB-2015-11-09.mp3

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Guests: Leonard David, Scott Sacknoff.  Topics:  The new book, “Space Careers” plus student guidance, space history.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back Leonard David and for the first time Scott Sacknoff to the program to discuss their new book, “Space Careers.”  For more information, visit the book’s website, www.spacebusiness.com/careers.  Note that we did not take a break in our program so it is only one segment.  Scott Sacknoff started us off with an overview of their book, why they wrote it and the history behind it given that it was originally written in 1998.  It has been fully revised for the new edition.  This book was a response to the many space industry job seekers along with high school and college students interested in a possible space career but without any resources to help guide them & navigate the expanding field of opportunities.  The specific target market for the book is high school through those already in the industry wanting to change jobs or needing to move on from their current job to something else.  The book contains key sections including how to interview, development of your resume, and more (see the website for details).  Leaders from with in the industry offer guidance and wisdom and Scott referenced some of the contributors.  The book also outlines scholarship opportunities and more.  Several listeners emailed our guests with questions such as wanting to know if the book was designed to attract someone to the industry not already interested in space.  Another listener wanted to know if global job opportunities were highlighted or if the book was only applicable for the United States.  Our guests talked about making the book available to university resource centers and others in a position to guide and counsel students.  Later, I asked Scott to compare and contrast the differences in the industry from 1998 when the book first appeared to today, 2015.  This is an interesting compare and contrast discussion with our guests so don’t miss it.  In addition, our guests talked about why space businesses fail, then Helen wanted to know about gender differences in the industry from 1998 to today.  You might be surprised by the answer to this question.  We were going to take a break but I took a call instead from Dr. Bryan Laubscher.  Bryan wanted to know more about why many new and young space companies fail.  He specifically asked what one should look for, the telling signs.  Scott and Leonard offered several pointers for Bryan and listeners to consider, then I chimed in regarding planning based on having interviewed many Space Show guests wanting to do something with the ISS and not having a Plan B for when the ISS is retired.  Bryan then focused his questioning on the importance of high strength materials.  I strongly recommend you listen to this discussion and what Bryan had to say about this subject and the importance of the “unsung heroes” involved in working on high strength materials.  Next, Bryan wanted to know about press releases and how to create a high quality PR.  Scott talked about including visions of the future as people want to be involved in doing things for the benefit of humanity and the future.  Leonard also talked about the media and press releases as did I.  Dr. Doug sent in a note suggesting different reasons for motivation and inspiration.  In the remaining time left we focused on the journal, “Quest:  The History of Spaceflight.”  Find out more about this publication at www.spacehistory101.com.  Scott said the journal was peer reviewed, he went over the process for submitting a story or article.  He also described many of the stories and articles that have appeared in the journal over the years. Leonard talked about the value of history and cited several examples, including the recent release of previously classified space documents that will be researched resulting in interesting papers, stories, and lessons learned from our past.  Both our guests offered us words of wisdom and quality closing comments so don’t miss them.

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can reach Scott or Leonard through the websites or me.

Dr. Brian Laubscher, Sunday, 6-8-14 June 9, 2014

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Dr. Brian Laubscher, Sunday, 6-8-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2258-BWB-2014-06-08.mp3

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Guest:  Dr. Bryan Laubscher.  Topics:  Carbon nanotubes, new manufacturing, Space Elevator.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.   For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Bryn Laubscher back to the program for our 2 hour 22 minute discussion about carbon nanotubes and the Space Elevator.  During our first segment, Dr. Laubscher talked about carbon nanotubes, the manufacturing process, how to move the process and technology forward, end uses for the product, possible timelines for advancement and the current day use of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) in the process.  Bryan talked about the need to find a better process for making carbon nanotubes than CVD.  Later is this segment, Dr. Laubscher was asked about the potential relationship to space other than with the space elevator.  This was an interesting discussion , don’t miss it.

In our second segment, Bryan talked about how hard and challenging the space elevator was and later in the segment, due to a call from Pooley, we went through many of the top challenges faced by the elevator with a status report on each one.  As this segment was opening, I did ask Bryan for a time line for space elevator advancement.  Our guest suggested that at some point, there would be significant demand for the elevator.  Next, we talked about the upcoming International Space Elevator 2014 Conference to be held at the Museum of Flight in Seattle, August 22-24, 2014.  For conference info, visit http://www.spaceelevatorconference.org. John from Ft. Worth called to talk about materials, composites and much more. We also talked about the strength needed for the elevator ribbon and John asked about SSTO.  Blaze emailed us about nuclear waste and Bryan had an interesting take on it. This was another valuable discussion, don’t miss it.  Dr. Laubscher talked about ribbon length, characteristics, strength needed, and its location in space, plus the counter weights it would need.  Adrian emailed several questions to us about the ribbon breaking and related issues.  He also asked our guest radiation issues.  Doug emailed about ways to climb up and down the ribbon.  Some of the other issues that came up were wind, lightening, ribbon oscillation, space debris, policy & regulatory issues.  As our program was ending, Bryan offered us words of wisdom and said his company website was http://www.odysseustech.com.  In addition, Dr. Peter Swan emailed us about his paper on the elevator which you can download and read at  http://www.virginiaedition.com/media/spaceelevators.pdf.

Post your comments/questions on TSS blog.  You can reach Dr. Laubscher through his website or me.

Dr. Dennis Bushnell, Tuesday, 7-23-13 July 24, 2013

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Dr. Dennis Bushnell, Tuesday, 7-23-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2055-BWB-2013-07-23.mp3

 

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Guest:  Dr. Dennis Bushnell.   Topics:  We discussed Dr. Bushnell’s paper, TRL for space development & how best to move forward with civil space.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed back to the program Dr. Dennis Bushnell, the NASA Langley Research Center Chief Scientist.  Dr. Bushnell discussed his paper, “Advanced-to-Revolutionary Space Technology Options-The Responsibly Imaginable.” which can be downloaded at http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20130011698_2013011376.pdf.  In the first segment of our 1 hour 26 minute show, Dr. Bushnell summarized the findings in his paper and talked about how we are still building on technologies from the 50’s and 60’s that were based on “living better with chemistry” and ICBMs.  We began talking about advanced propulsion including nuclear, but our guest made it clear throughout our discussion that what was needed was a reduction in the cost of space access by a magnitude of 10, not by two which is what is happening with new commercial rockets coming on line.  In fact, later in the show when discussing commercial space, Dr. Bushnell was clear that to close a commercial space business plan the reduction in launch costs by a factor of ten was absolutely essential!  I asked our guest to tell us where the bottlenecks were and he said it was in the culture & big cultural changes were required to move forward.  He also talked about the need to experiment and try lots of options and ideas, to triage them, down select, fly them, and choose the best based on the engineering process he described.  We talked about the low technology readiness level (TRL) of many of today’s space ideas and technologies, that we have become focused on instant or near instant gratification but that the process he was talking about would extend over a 25 year period.  Given this, his paper is a frank and factual discussion of many of our space industry segments, a no nonsense, no Kool Aid TRL analysis of much of what we talk about and say we can now do in space or will be doing in the near term.  Safety was discussed, including microgravity, radiation, plus a mention of unknowns regarding what we already know about gut bacteria exposed to radiation given our limited amount of research on this topic to date. A listener asked him about physics as a main reason for space exploration and contrasted that to settlement as the main reason for HSF. Another listener asked him about his mentioning USAF comments that indicated space was a mature and declining industry.  We began talking about commercial space, but we talked about it through the second segment as well.  In this segment, Dennis talked about how we have created economic growth in the past but now we have not only the challenge of economic growth but sustainable jobs and sustaining our standard of living.  Terraforming Mars was discussed as part of our discussion about Inspiration Mars and Mars One HSF missions to Mars.  As this segment ended, a listener asked him about suborbital space and citizen science projects.

In the second segment, John Hunt called in to talk about the high cost of many advanced space technologies, plus he wanted updates on LENR (this used to be called cold fusion).  Dr. Bushnell had much to say about LENR and it potential, we talked about Rossi, and the NASA work being done to better understand LENR effects. With an understanding of it, funding would not be as big a problem as it is today.  He also said LENR had the potential to be transmutational.  Our guest suggested that for more information, we visit the Larsen LENR slideshow:  www.slideshare.net/lewisglarsen/slideshows.  Again, he pointed to cultural issues as major stumbling blocks to this research.  In returning to the focus of his paper, he said there was no shortage of ideas but the culture was preventing them from being tried, tested, and exploited.  Rocket reusability was brought up, our guest mentioned the SpaceX Grasshopper work, and he was asked about SLS and fuel depots.  I asked about BLEO issues and radiation.  In response to another question, he said that were he the space guru, he would focus on “energy” and structural materials. You will want to hear this discussion. Later, Tim called from Huntsville about radiation and HSF to Mars, as well as the economics of the Big Dumb Booster.  I asked Dennis about the target audience for his paper and he said it was meant for NASA and the world since space fairing is a world endeavor. He again talked about potential revolutionary technologies which are needed and which would benefit all of us.  He repeated that we must do the difficult and take the risk and invest.  We also need to look forward with multiyear planning.  Near the end of the program, Dennis was asked about space elevators which he was not enthusiastic about.  Again, he repeated that we needed to make investments to raise our TRL levels.  At the end, I asked why space does not rise to importance in presidential campaigns & elections.  He said space was very good as an Earth utility but beyond that, there was no clear basis for most of it and that was the problem. Don’t miss his comments on this topic.  Our final topic was his assessment of commercial space given his years spent working on it with NASA including budgets into the hundreds of millions to find a way to close a commercial space business case for commercializing the ISS and other things.  This is a very important short discussion, don’t miss it.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email Dr. Bushnell through me or you can find his address using the NASA email locator.

Open Lines, Sunday, 10-7-12 October 7, 2012

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Open Lines, Sunday, 10-7-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1867-BWB-2012-10-07.mp3

Guest:  Dr. David Livingston.   Topics:  Open Lines discussion on various space topics per the choice of the listeners calling today’s show.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. Welcome to today’s two hour 15 minute Open Lines discussion.  The program was in three segments but as we focused on just a few topics for the entire discussion, this summary will not be divided by segments.  I started the discussion by describing upcoming Space Show programs, then putting out a few discussion topics.  As it turned out, the dominant topic discussed by the listeners had to do with astronaut safety and the recent program with guest Rand Simberg from Monday, Oct. 1, 2012. Rand talked about our being too risk averse, the need for more lives to be at risk to do valuable space missions, etc. You can hear his program at http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1863-BWB-2012-10-01.mp3. Several callers took issue with much of what Rand said and for the most part thought that space missions were valued and that human spaceflight was already risky.  Listeners went back and forth on this topic across all segments of the program, talking about shuttle accident rates, proposed accident rates for Constellation, Orion, Dragon, and more.  Some listeners even talked about aviation safety rates, military jets, and the track records of the Atlas 5, Delta IV, and Arianne V rockets.  For part of this discussion, we also talked about the liability limitation laws passed in spaceport states including California which recently signed into law its version of law. We talked about what this might mean for the industry, for spaceflight participants, and even if the would hold up in an accident.

As part of the HSF safety discussions, we also talked about launch abort and escape systems.  We took a call at the first of the second segment from Charles in Oregon who  wanted to talk about the lunar space elevator, SLS and propellant depots, our second most talked about topic for the day.  Charles is a strong proponent of the lunar space elevator and depots, but others called in from the skeptical side of things which was my position.  At times the discussion switched to the space elevator here on Earth but everybody agreed that the lunar space elevator was much more doable. I kept challenging Charles and proponents of this and the depots to show me the complete and thorough financial analysis and trades for these missions with assumptions as that would be the only way to know if these concepts had legs to stand on.  If Charles does get me some of this documentation and its viable, I will use it in a future Space Show program.  Tim in Huntsville wanted to know my thoughts on various alternative launch systems & my preferences for which type of space missions.  There were other topics scattered throughout our program including the 23 mile skydive by Felix Baumgartner with Red Bull scheduled for Oct. 8th, fusion propulsion, and the SpaceX launch going to the ISS later today.

     If you want to email any of the callers to this program, send your note to me and I will forward it for you.  Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog URL above.

Dr. Bryan Laubscher & Victor Cummings, Sunday, 9-9-12 September 9, 2012

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Dr. Bryan Laubscher & Victor Cummings, Sunday, 9-9-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1851-BWB-2012-09-09.mp3

Guests:  Dr. Bryan Laubscher, Victor Cummings.  Topics:  The space elevator screenplay, “High Lift.”  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed back Dr. Bryan Laubscher and for the first time Victor Cummings to discuss the space elevator screenplay, “High Lift.”  This screenplay won the ScriptVamp 2011 Dream Quest: Feature Screenwriting Competition and was the Grand Prize Winner.  Visit

https://scriptvamp.com/Victor_E.html for more information about the screenplay and the competition. Visit the High Lift website at www.highlift.us.   Victor started our discussion by providing us with his background that took him into the screenwriting profession. He talked about challenges & screenplay issues plus the differences in a screenplay compared to other forms of writing.  Both Victor and Bryan told us some about the story line, the plot and as a result of my pressuring them, the villain!  The space elevator is considered to already be in existence in the story and there are space elevator centers for different purposes and destinations.  As you will hear, using the space elevator is key to solving the global warming problem and saving the Earth.  Both our guests talked about reviews and oversight from professionals, agents, etc.  They told us how they had to remove much of the science jargon and focus the screenplay on a younger and more generally educated audience.  Listeners asked several email questions about the science fiction genre in screenplays as well as target audience and marketing concerns.  Our guests talked quite a bit about the issues in getting an agent, making that first sale, and capturing an audience.  We also talked about science fiction usually being bigger in the budget area and more costly, probably due to technical special effects.  Near the end of the first segment, a listener wanted to know if a successful screenplay and movie would further interest, funding, and development of the space elevator project.

In the second segment, we talked about markets and the need to break the circular loop of needing to have a sale but needing to have an agent but first needing the sale.  We talked about their winning the ScriptVamp competition per above and raising money for their project through crowd sourcing, particularly Kickstarter.  A listener suggested our guests attend the well known Maui Writers Conference and another brought up the Darpa 100 Year Starship Program.  As our program was drawing to a close, Victor and Bryan asked for help with Hollywood type contacts for their screenplay.

If you want to contact Victor and Bryan, send your note to me and I will forward it to them both.  Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog per the above URL.

Dr. Bryan Laubscher, Monday, 7-16-12 July 17, 2012

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Dr. Bryan Laubscher, Monday, 7-16-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1815-BWB-2012-07-16.mp3

Guest:  Dr. Bryan Laubscher.  Topics:  The Space Elevator and the upcoming annual elevator conference.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We welcomed back Dr. Bryan Laubscher for our annual space elevator update program.  Our first order of business was to discuss the upcoming Space Elevator 2012 conference.  Check it out at www.isec.org/sec.  Registration, hotel, programming, speaker, and session information is provided on the website.  Dr. Laubscher noted some differences this year including its location, the Seattle Museum of Flight.  Also, the Family Science Fest on the conference first day.  Bryan highlighted some of the sessions including those dealing with elevator operations and alternative launch options including Stratolauncher.  We fielded several email questions from listeners and then Michael called in to ask about security requirements for the elevator.  This turned out to be a most interesting discussion but one leaving us with lots of unanswered questions. In discussing elevator security, we talked about international law, the proposed Law of the Sea Treaty, offshore oil platforms, territorial water issues, DOD and department of Navy defense actions, and more.  Tony emailed in a series of questions including one that asked about the rotovavtor.  Later, I asked Bryan if elevator security should be a taxpayer responsibility and he said yes, noting that revenues from the elevator along with taxes paid would be in excess of security costs.  We then talked about the elevator being an international project or an American project.  Bryan preferred American but we talked about both sides of this issue.  Bryan also had lots to say about materials and the CNT ribbon.  He told us about the detangler and the size of the ribbon, plus the incremental plan in ribbon development.  We asked Bryan timeline questions and it was also said that the biggest problem other than materials waiting to be solved was the surface to LEO transportation.

In our second shorter segment, we talked about inspiration, the need to learn systems engineering, and the absence of congressional political support for the elevator.  A listener asked about the payload capacity which Bryan said was 20 tons.  He mentioned spinoff technology including energy storage.  Terry wanted to know how scalable the elevator concept was and Bryan mentioned progress with climber reusability issues. In our summary, he said the overall biggest challenge still remained the materials.

Post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog. If you want to contact Dr. Laubscher, send your email to me for forwarding.  For more info on the conference, use www.isec.org/sec/index.php/contact-us.

 

Dr. Jordin Kare, Sunday, 5-20-12 May 20, 2012

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Dr. Jordin Kare, Sunday, 5-20-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1778-BWB-2012-05-20.mp3

Guest:  Dr. Jordin Kare. Topics:  Beamed energy propulsion updates.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We welcomed Dr. Jordin Kare back to the program for beamed energy propulsion (BEP) industry updates.  Be sure to visit his website for more information, www.lasermotive.com.  Our discussion started out by referencing two recent BEP studies involving NASA. The first, the Beamed Energy Propulsion Study was completed last year and was a joint study with DARPA.  The newer study which is still being finalized is the NASA Ride The Light Project.  As you will hear, these studies suggest technical feasibility but call into question basic economic questions such as is BEP worth it and who will pay for it.  Dr. Kare and I then engaged in an interesting discussion about the NASA cost estimation compared to Dr. Kare’s cost estimation.  I urge you to listen carefully to this discussion.  You may find as I and others did that it explains a lot regarding economic challenges to our current space programs. A listener as Jordin about the costs for a laser demo project.  Jordin then estimated costs depending on the type of demo project involved.  Also, Jordin was quick to point out that the economic conclusions of the studies were not the kiss of death as I suggested so again, listen attentively to what he has to say about this matter.  Ben emails us wanting to know how laser beamed energy works.  Jordin then described the basics of BEP, requirements for the beam to always be hitting the rocket all the way to space, and many factors related to laser launch.  We talked about the hydrogen fuel, the need to be in a cloud free location, and the theoretical limits to a BEP system.  Basic ISP was discussed and Jordin compared to BEP to traditional chemical rockets and different fuels.  BEP is about twice the ISP of a typical chemical rocket.  Dr. Kare described the three schools of thought and approaches to BEP, and as the segment ended, he responded to a question about the space elevator concept.

In our second segment,Alice asked about the ease in getting federal grant money for BEP projects and we learned its not easy.  A listener asked for a basic explanation of power beaming so Jordin took us through the power beaming and wireless power transmission concepts.  We talked about near term commercial projects using lasers and here, Jordin directed us to his company, LaserMotive, as they are involved in several commercial projects unrelated to space.  This is another interesting discussion, don’t miss it.  A caller asked how the laser beam is kept aligned with the rocket as it accelerates to orbit.  He also asked about problems resulting from the wobble.  I asked about laser launch for HSF, launch abort issues, and a listener asked about the laser frequencies used.  Other subjects included the military use of lasers, migratory birds, & thin film solar panels. As our program ended, Jordin was asked look at laser launch over the near and intermediate term plus if it could be used for sea launch.

Please post your comments/questions for Dr. Jordin Kare on The Space Show blog above.

 

Open Lines, Tuesday, 3-13-12 March 14, 2012

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Open Lines, Tuesday, 3-13-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1734-BWB-2012-03-13.mp3

 

Guest:  Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  An Open Lines program covers a wide variety of topics of interest to the listeners.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, & discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, & any discussion must be relevant & applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. Welcome to this 2 hour 20 minute Open Lines discussion largely driven by listeners calling the program.  In our first hour segment, I listed the usual possible discussion topics which I won’t repeat here. As to be expected, listeners had their own ideas as to what they wanted to talk about though we did address some of the issues I previewed including NASA & the treatment of their chimps in the early space program given that PETA wants to establish a chimp empathy museum at KSC,  NASA budget cuts & the recent congressional hearings, the Defense Intelligence Agency Chinese space program wake up call, & more. The congressional hearings of last week made it to our discusses as listeners focused on what was said by Senator Nelson, Senator Hutchinson, NASA Administrator Bolden, & Dr. Tyson in his short presentation. Listeners also talked about the comments by Texas Congresswoman Eddie Johnson regarding commercial space/crew on the House side. Also in the first segment, Tim called in to inquire about a possible IPO for Space X.

In our second segment, Dr. Jurist called in to express his disappointment at the elimination of funding for the Operationally Responsive Space office/program.  This took us to a discussion about national security space & I asked Dr. Jurist about the Defense Intelligence Agency wake up call regarding the Chinese space program as expressed by their director Ronald L. Burgess.  Somehow we then got off on the topic of the planned retirement of the B-52 in 2040, about 88 years after it became operational.  While Dr. Jurist was talking with us, Tim sent in several email questions for him on microgravity experiments to determine what level of gravity was needed for humans for space settlement & long duration flights.  John Hunt followed with comments about VASIMR, nuclear propulsion, & even fusion powered spacecraft down the road in our future.  Tom Hanson of the Living Universe Foundation called in to let people know they are seeking Foundation board members (www.luf.org/contact).  I then introduced another topic from a current article in Popular Science, a 20,000 mph train to space (www.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-03/all-aboard-20000-mile-hour-low-earth-orbit-express).  This article refers to a newer version of StarTram & this brought in several more callers including Trent from Australia. Other listeners chimed in on the train to space idea as well though most did not take the article very seriously.  I introduced the news that Turkey had agreed to the Moon Treaty & then Terry called in at the end to talk about the X-37C & that it might become a crewed vehicle.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog URL above. If you want to contact any of our callers, send your note to me & I will forward it for you.  If you want more info on any of the news stories I mentioned, let me know & I will send it to you.

Tom Olson, Tuesday, 12-27-11 December 28, 2011

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Tom Olson, Tuesday, 12-27-11

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1679-BWB-2011-12-27.mp3

Guest:  Tom Olson.  Topics:  The year 2011 in review regarding all space issues.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  The Space Show/OGLF is now engaged in its annual fundraising drive. Please see & act upon our appeal at https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com/2011/11/21/space-show-2011-fundraising-campaign.  We welcomed Tom Olson back to the show for his annual yearly summary of space events.  We had much to cover in this 105 minute program.  Tom started out reminding us that 2011 was the 50th anniversary of human spaceflight.  He told us about the banner year for Yuri’s Night parties around the globe celebrating this important milestone and specifically about the even he attended in New Your City.  Next, he pointed out the recent National Press Club talk given by Elon Musk on going to Mars and building the rockets to take us there, plus his recent New Scientist interview which you can read in full on the Mars Society website.  Tom commented that the sky was actually falling in 2011 with two large junk satellites coming back to Earth.  We also talked about the return of Phobos Grunt to earth probably in early to mid-January 2012.  One of the big events we discussed for 2011 was the retirement of the shuttle.  This led us to discussing the recent Chinese space rendezvous and the fact that China is now the number two launching country behind Russia having overtaken the U.S. this year.  Planetary missions were part of our year in review with Vesta and Dawn, the Kepler Space Telescope, MSL with Curiosity.  New Horizons continued its journey to Pluto and Explorer 1 continued beyond our solar system.  Tom talked about SLS and the ORION MPC Vehicle, plus the James Webb Space Telescope and its cost issues in the context of its impact on the NASA budget.  Soyuz rocket problems along with all the Russian rocket failures this year were fair game for our discussion.  I asked Tom what he thought of the idea of SLS as a place holder for skill sets and technology until our space program improves.  Don’t miss his answer.  He brought up Virgin Galactic’s drop tests this year, especially the last one where trouble showed up.  Making news for 2011 were NASA and space industry workforce layoffs and the successful Falcon 9 and Dragon launch.  At the end of the first segment, Bigelow Aerospace was in our spotlight.  In segment two, Tom led off with XCOR news, Terry called wondering about CCDEV3 and Tom suggested program winners!  Don’t miss his prediction.  He also was asked to predict the cancellation year for SLS.  Don’t miss this prediction as well.  We talked about the upcoming New Space Business Plan Competition for 2012, the prizes which are the largest ever, and the timing.  If this interests you, make sure to stay tuned for more information.  Later in the segment we began a summary of our discussion and 2011.  Tom was asked about the space elevator and the Lunar Space Elevator.  We wrapped up our discussion talking about growth in the space conferences even in the tough economic year of 2011.  Post your comments and questions on The Space Show blog URL above.

Open Lines, Monday, 12-26-11 December 27, 2011

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Open Lines, Monday, 12-26-11

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1678-BWB-2011-12-26.mp3

Guest:  Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  Elon Musk New Scientist interview on his Mars plans, rocket development costs, policy issues.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  The Space Show/OGLF is now engaged in its annual fundraising drive. Please see & act upon our appeal at https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com/2011/11/21/space-show-2011-fundraising-campaign.  We welcomed the final 2011 Open Lines program.  During our two hour discussion with one break, I outlined discussion topics up front but as you will hear, one topic struck home. Listeners wanted to talk about the New Scientist interview with Elon Musk entitled “I’ll Put Millions of People on Mars, says Elon Musk.”  You can read the full interview on The Mars Society website, www.marssociety.org/home/press/news/illputmillionsofpeopleonmarssayselonmusk.  Callers honed in on the reported development costs for the Mars spaceship ranging from the $2-$5 billion.  Those that called the program thought this was inadequate funding.  At one point I looked up the development costs for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner which so far was estimated at $32 billion.  Since all of us thought a Mars spaceship was more complicated and involved in R&D than a new Boeing jetliner, listeners seemed to be more convinced that the projected costs were too low.  One listener brought up the costs of military projects such as the F22, the JSF, nuclear powered carriers and submarines, etc.  Another listener wanted to know if Space X was planning to open up additional launch sites to those that are publicly known.  In the second longer segment, not only did the military hardware come up for cost comparisons, but John in Atlanta wanted to talk about the Space News Op-Ed by Christopher Kraft (http://spacenews.com/commentaries/111219-nasa-needs-wake-reality.html).  Mr. Kraft wrote about the need to internationalize projects and make use of publicly available international hardware rather than build the SLS.  Tim called in from Huntsville to talk about the Musk interview, the rocket development costs, and using space resources to lower the costs.  He even suggested Elon make use of the QuickLaunch idea to put lox/kerosene in orbit for refueling.  Dr. Jurist called in to talk about the human factors for a Mars mission and that they seem to be understated by the Mars advocates.  Dr. Jurist speculated that it might take 5-10 years just to be able to address most of the human factor issues, not including what might be involved in implementing solutions.  We then talked about Stratolaunch and air launch.  We talked about the small payload capacity of the proposed vehicle and the need for multiple flight depending on the mission and the needed total payload.  Our next topic was yet another Soyuz failure and what this might mean for the ISS if the Soyuz problems are not fixed.  Terry called in again from Corpus Christi to talk about the Falcon 9 & Dragon flight in early February and how the success of the flight might become a driver for more commercial crew funding from the government.  With Dr. Jurist, we also explored the idea of inviting a certain UC Davis aerospace engineering professor to the program to discuss horizontal versus vertical launch and reusability.  I concluded this program with my own wish list for more civility within our space advocacy family and for real leadership with responsibility and accountability to emerge at all levels in Washington, DC, not just for space, but for the future of our nation.  If you have comments or questions, post them on The Space Show blog URL above.