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Open Lines, Sunday, 6-28-15 June 29, 2015

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Open Lines, Sunday, 6-28-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2498-BWB-2015-06-28.mp3

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Guests: Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston; Topics: Falcon 9 launch failure, SpaceX, New Horizons, Pluto, and more.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

 

Welcome to our last Open Lines program for June 2015.  During the first segment of our 2 hour 9 minute program, we started off with my customary suggestion of a few topics including the Falcon 9 launch failure and a Space Review article from June 8 of this year by Dr. Sam Dinkin, “How much money would it take to launch enterprise into space? (See www.thespacereviewe.com/article/2766/1).  Our first caller, Dr. Dwayne Day, wanted to talk about Sam’s article and analysis.  We had an interesting discussion on its contents but see what you think after reading the short article.  Dwayne also talked about the coming Pluto flyby by New Horizons.  I then asked Dwayne for his thoughts on the Falcon 9 launch failure.  Dwayne offered us several interesting observations about the launch failure and SpaceX.  Our next caller was Tim from Huntsville and he too wanted to talk about the Falcon 9 launch attempt.  He kept repeating we have to do better than chemical rockets.  Before the break, I read an email that came in from Kelly.  Kelly is not a fan or supporter of SpaceX but as you know, The Space Show is willing to air all sides of an argument so I read Kelly’s email on air as it had much to say that was critical about SpaceX.

 

In the second segment Kelly was our first caller.  I put it to Kelly to support his critical comments about the company.  Kelly then talked about lots of issues about SpaceX processes ranging from parts, manufacturing, cutting corners, safety and more.  Several listeners sent in emails asking Kelly direct questions about what he was saying.  I made it clear that I did not agree with much of what he was saying but you give it some thought and decide the issue for yourself. Keep in mind that it is not unusual for a new rocket to have problems, even to fail to reach orbit.  Sometimes many flights have to take place to discover a problem. As I said, I have every confidence that SpaceX will fix whatever the problem is and resume launches as soon as possible.   Kelly sent in a few additional emails during the balance of the show to support the claims he was making.  Our next caller was Dr. Doug from S. California. Doug wanted to talk about the Falcon 9 launch and the need for multiple launchers which he said were a good thing.   Listner Karen emailed us with a question about the Falcon 9 debris field, then Tim called back, then Michael Listner called to continue talking about New Horizons and Pluto.  During Michael’s call, he got a listener question asking if the money would have been better spent on a Uranus mission.  He also talked about the possible regulatory impact of the Falcon 9 loss including RD180 engines, ULA, Air Force certification, and fallout with Senator McCain on his subcommittee regarding the RD180 engines.   Dwayne called back to talk Pluto, the Decadal Survey and planetary missions, plus he talked about the Applied Physics Lab (APL), the Uranus mission mentioned earlier by a listeners and more.

 

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above.  You can reach all the callers and emailers through me.

Thomas Marotta, Tuesday, 4-21-15 April 22, 2015

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Thomas Marotta, Tuesday, 4-21-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2458-BWB-2015-04-21.mp3

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Guest:  Thomas Marotta.  Topic:  March Storm 2015 Citizen Space Agenda.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

 

We welcomed Tom Marotta to the show to discuss his March Storm experiences and the March Storm agenda.  For more information, visit both the March Storm website, www.marchstorm.com and his personal website, www.thisorbitallife.com.  During the first segment of our 91 minute discussion, Tom started out by introducing us to March Storm, then he talked about his decision to participate this year and the training that followed before meeting with members of congress.  Throughout the segment he was asked about the training by various listeners.  It was one day, it included lots of role playing, and extensive familiarization with the March Storm agenda and issues.  Those participating also did due diligence on the members of congress they were intending to visit.  Efforts were made to match participants with congressional members from their local districts or at least their home state.  I asked Tom several general questions including those pertaining to the gender of the participants, age, and diversity.  Tom then spoke about the Citizens Space Agenda for March Storm which included five areas, the SEDS Act, the Cheap Access to Space act and prize, to fully fund commercial crew, to extend the learning period of the FAA for suborbital and commercial spaceflight without burying the industry in excessive regulation, and to avoid the loss of the ISS should the Russians really remove their module as they have indicated they might do.  The total number of briefings for March Storm were 127, most of which took place with staffers.  Throughout out discussion, Tom pointed out the wide range in interest, awareness, and knowledge of the staffers ranging from not interested and no knowledge to just the opposite.  Tom also highlighted Congressman Dana Rohrabacher and his staff as an example of being very interested in space and the March Storm agenda.  In fact he said that congress would pass he SEDS Act though no timeline was given.  Before the end of the first segment, I asked Tom for a realistic assessment of actual congressional support and action on their agenda. Don’t miss his assessment.

 

In the second segment, we talked more about training, writing to members of congress, I gave a rant on petitioning our government on issues we are passionate about including space, then TR asked if members of congress think about detailed issues like artificial gravity.  Tom said they did not lobby on specific issues such as stated in the TR email, instead they stuck to their agenda and were very specific in not asking for money or money driven legislation.  Human spaceflight safety came up in an email listener question as did the SpaceShip2 accident.  Space Settlement was a major topic in a call by John from Ft. Worth.  As the show was ending, we talked about a congressional joint resolution rather than a law and Tom called for those in California, Texas, Maryland and Florida to contact their members of congress on the March Storm agenda.

 

Please post your comments/questions on TSS blog above. You can reach Tom through his site or me.

 

Erik Seedhouse, Monday, 7-21-14 July 22, 2014

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Erik Seedhouse, Monday, 7-21-14

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2285-BWB-2014-07-21.mp3

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Guest:  Erik Seedhouse.  Topics:  His new book, “Tourists In Space: A Practical Guide, Second Edition.”  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

 

We welcomed back Erik Seedhouse to the program to discuss the new Second Edition of “Tourists In Space: A Practical Guide.”  In our first segment of our 1 hour 26 minute show, Erik told us that the second edition was about 80% new and that it would be released the end of August.  If you buy the book on Amazon, you can order it at the special pre-release price.  Also, be sure to use the OGLF portal explained in the archive summary statement, on the blog and on both TSS & OGLF websites.  If you purchase it using the OGLF portal, Amazon makes a contribution to The Space Show.  Erik opened with the manual part of the book and mentioned his suborbital training company, Suborbital Training located in Melbourne, Florida.  For more information on suborbital training, visit http://www.suborbitaltraining.com.  Next, Erik talked about the flight profiles for both the XCOR Lynx and the Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo.  I asked Erik for the top 3 or 4 challenges to the industry and he cited space safety as the largest challenge to overcome.  Other top challenges included the spaceship noise which will be very loud, vibrations, acceleration, and space motion sickness.  He talked about the impact mostly on the cardiac system.  Erik was asked about the use of spacesuits with by the various companies.  We also discussed orbital space tourism using the Dragon and then later using the Dream Chaser.  Erik was asked if spaceflight participant medical exams would be done by special doctors or one’s own doctor even if the doctor has no aerospace expertise or experience.  Before the break & in response to a question, Erik pointed out that the industry was on hold given the all the earlier “cry wolf” announcements about starting revenue flights.

 

In the second segment, Erik talked about going to space at the designated and approved altitude by the FAI in France, the official international record and standards keeping organization for space issues.  He pointed out that 50 miles was not space.  We talked some about the World View project, then our topic switched to spaceports here in the U.S. as well as those planned for outside the country. Erik raised some red flags given the spaceships are under ITAR control which might make it very difficult for them to be operated in a foreign country under present ITAR rules/regulations.   Orbital tourism came up for Dream Chaser, Dragon V2 and the Bigelow Aerospace habs.  In speaking about the industry, our guest pointed out how SpaceX was changing spaceflight by their success.  The Brownsville, TX proposed SpaceX spaceport got lots of discussion time and email questions.  Erik pointed out two commercial spacesuit design companies, Orbital Outfitters and Final Frontier Design.  Near the end of our program, point to point transportation was discussed as were the potential winners in the upcoming commercial crew NASA down select process.

 

Post your comments/questions on TSS blog above.  You can contact Erik Seedhouse through me.

Robert (Bob) Zimmerman, Tuesday, 6-11-13 June 12, 2013

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Robert (Bob) Zimmerman, Tuesday, 6-11-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2027-BWB-2013-06-11.mp3

Guest: Robert (Bob) Zimmerman.  Topics:  Commercial space, regulations, climate science, becoming spacefaring.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We welcomed Robert (Bob) Zimmerman to the program (www.behindtheblack.com).  During our 2 hour 3 minute discussion with Bob, we covered a wide area of space, policy, budget and climate science issues.  For those of you interested in the opportunity to submit feedback on the NRC congressionally mandated Human Spaceflight Study, please go to www.nationalacademies.org/humanspaceflight.  Bob started out talking about the Commercial Space Launch Act of 2004 and his warnings back then about a heavily regulated commercial and NewSpace industry coming out of this particular legislation.  He has now reported on the evolution of regulation for this segment of the industry.  See this article on his blog, http://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/essays-and-commentaries/the-red-tape-of-the-space-bureaucracy.  He strongly suggested that the focus was misplaced on excessive safety.  Instead, it should be on risk taking, innovation, and experimental flight.  We also mentioned possible ITAR changes in which human spaceflight vehicles are being considered for addition to the munitions list.  Were this to happen, it might prove extremely detrimental to NewSpace companies and the American space industry.  Pooley both emailed and called the show to stress starting small and with non-human spaceflight missions. Bob and Charles had an interesting exchange on this subject you will want to hear.  Later in the segment, Bob talked about SpaceX and launch rates, comparing the Falcon with the Russian Proton.  We talked about the need for reliable commercial schedules for a launcher to be considered commercial.  We also talked about the successful Orbital Sciences Antares demo flight, ULA and their schedules, plus Arianespace.  Bob then commented on the first powered demo flight for Virgin, then Tim from Huntsville called in to talk abut SpaceX, a possible IPO, Bob’s comments on NASA assimilation, and the Planetary Resources Kickstarter campaign.

In our second segment, we started with another Pooley email stressing the need to start small & without human spaceflight.  I then asked Bob what he thought of the prospect of continuing to fund & develop SLS.  He said it was on the knife’s edge and to the degree that SpaceX, Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy, Dragon, and Orbital can be successful, it will likely hasten the demise of SLS.  Bob then spoke to the bulkhead cracks with the Orion, their repairs and the recent successful Orion test.  Sequestration was next up with Bob having much to say on the subject.  Our next big topic had to do with climate science which I introduced with my perspective of it here in the U.S. and what I know about what is going on in the field in the UK and throughout Europe.  Bob talked about climate models and referenced the work by Roy Spencer who depicts in graph format all 72 climate models referenced by the industry (see www.drroyspencer.com/2013/06/still-epic-fail-73-climate-models-vs-measurements-running-5-year-means).  Bob dealt with many climate science issues so if this topic interests you, don’t miss this discussion.  Later, we talked about the Chinese spacecraft now in orbit for about a two week HSF mission.  Also discussed was the JWST and its impact on NASA astrophysics budget issues, the Kepler Space Telescope, and our on orbit repair capabilities. Both Bob & I used JWST and Kepler as examples of why we need to develop a true spacefaring capability though being able to repair hardware so far out in space is not going to happen for a very long time, if ever.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can email Bob through his blog or by using zimmerman at nasw dot org.

Open Lines, Sunday, 10-7-12 October 7, 2012

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Open Lines, Sunday, 10-7-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1867-BWB-2012-10-07.mp3

Guest:  Dr. David Livingston.   Topics:  Open Lines discussion on various space topics per the choice of the listeners calling today’s show.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. Welcome to today’s two hour 15 minute Open Lines discussion.  The program was in three segments but as we focused on just a few topics for the entire discussion, this summary will not be divided by segments.  I started the discussion by describing upcoming Space Show programs, then putting out a few discussion topics.  As it turned out, the dominant topic discussed by the listeners had to do with astronaut safety and the recent program with guest Rand Simberg from Monday, Oct. 1, 2012. Rand talked about our being too risk averse, the need for more lives to be at risk to do valuable space missions, etc. You can hear his program at http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1863-BWB-2012-10-01.mp3. Several callers took issue with much of what Rand said and for the most part thought that space missions were valued and that human spaceflight was already risky.  Listeners went back and forth on this topic across all segments of the program, talking about shuttle accident rates, proposed accident rates for Constellation, Orion, Dragon, and more.  Some listeners even talked about aviation safety rates, military jets, and the track records of the Atlas 5, Delta IV, and Arianne V rockets.  For part of this discussion, we also talked about the liability limitation laws passed in spaceport states including California which recently signed into law its version of law. We talked about what this might mean for the industry, for spaceflight participants, and even if the would hold up in an accident.

As part of the HSF safety discussions, we also talked about launch abort and escape systems.  We took a call at the first of the second segment from Charles in Oregon who  wanted to talk about the lunar space elevator, SLS and propellant depots, our second most talked about topic for the day.  Charles is a strong proponent of the lunar space elevator and depots, but others called in from the skeptical side of things which was my position.  At times the discussion switched to the space elevator here on Earth but everybody agreed that the lunar space elevator was much more doable. I kept challenging Charles and proponents of this and the depots to show me the complete and thorough financial analysis and trades for these missions with assumptions as that would be the only way to know if these concepts had legs to stand on.  If Charles does get me some of this documentation and its viable, I will use it in a future Space Show program.  Tim in Huntsville wanted to know my thoughts on various alternative launch systems & my preferences for which type of space missions.  There were other topics scattered throughout our program including the 23 mile skydive by Felix Baumgartner with Red Bull scheduled for Oct. 8th, fusion propulsion, and the SpaceX launch going to the ISS later today.

     If you want to email any of the callers to this program, send your note to me and I will forward it for you.  Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog URL above.

Rand Simberg, Monday, 10-1-12 October 1, 2012

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Rand Simberg, Monday, 10-1-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1863-BWB-2012-10-01.mp3

Guest: Rand Simberg. Topics: “Our irrational Quest For Absolute Safety in Spaceflight.” You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We welcomed back Rand Simberg to discuss his views on space safety with human spaceflight. On the heels of his successful Kickstarter campaign to finance his upcoming book on the subject, he discussed his early draft book ideas on this subject. While the program was two hours in length in two equal segments, this summary will reflect our discussion without regards to the segments because our overriding themes and our discussion carried over from segment to segment. Rand provided us with the background for his interest in this topic, he shared some logistical information with us as to how Kickstarter works and then we talked about the topic. Rand is purposely provocative both in the draft of the book that I read plus in our discussion today. Rand wanted to be provocative to help drive the point that in his opinion, we need a national discussion as to the importance of our space program & missions. He points out through a good historical summary in the book and on the show that in past exploration and big projects, we were willing to risk human life to accomplish the mission. To be clear, he does not advocate carelessness, stupidity, or anything like that but he says if space is really important, the mission or the objective should be more valuable than the life of the crew. Since we pursue ultimate astronaut safety, it confirms that what we are doing in space is not important. He cited example after example of this & I brought in additional examples including DOD & our Rules of Engagement in our Middle Eastern wars as our military safety takes second place or worse to the policy goals. The Hubble repair mission was an example of NASA reversing the initial policy where clearly the administrator at the time would not risk a crew and instead would let the HST be destroyed. Dr. Griffin reversed that decision showing that keeping Hubble going was valuable and worth the human risk. We had lots of callers and emailers, some agreeing with Rand and others more or less in agreement with him but challenging him in some areas of his discussion. Rand has some terrific one liners in the book and he said some on air. One such impactful line can be found near the end of the draft version of his book that I have as he is writing about opening up the harsh frontier & needing a rational approach to the space safety issue by saying “If we really mean it, we will dedicate a (large) national cemetery to those who will die in doing so.” Again, his purpose is to be provocative to make his point. Rand was asked if he has talked up his ideas to members of congress, staffers, policy makers, and such. Listen to how he responded to these questions. He was completely frank about it, including responding to questions about the impact his blog writings and those of others have on our current policy. Calling for a national discussion as to what our space policy should be, including how we value the purpose & the mission as compared to the astronauts is an important idea.
     If you have comments/questions for Rand Simberg regarding this two hour discussion, please post them on The Space Show blog above. If you want to email Rand, you can do so through me or his blog, http://www.transterrestrial.com.

Michael Ciannilli, Leonard David, Tuesday, 7-17-12 July 17, 2012

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Michael Ciannilli, Leonard David, Tuesday, 7-17-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1816-BWB-2012-07-17.mp3

Lessons Learned from the Columbia accident & NASA’s human spaceflight experience

Guests:  Michael Ciannilli, Leonard David.  Topics:  Columbia lessons learned & human spaceflight safety issues.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed Michael Ciannilli of NASA to the program to discuss lessons learned from the Columbia accident & NASA’s history of human spaceflight. Leonard David of Space.com returned as a co-host for this program.  Our nearly two hour no break discussion started with Michael providing us with an historical overview of the Columbia accident.  We talked about the debris retrieval process & the fact that about 38% of Columbia was retrieved.  Michael was asked about surprises & among the many he mentioned, one in particular dealt with the tile & thermal impact showing burning on the inside & how that was a clue to what happened to Columbia.  Michael then listed several lessons learned.  When I asked if he could prioritize the items he mentioned, he said they were all important.  We talked about the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB), return to flight, incorporating lessons learned, & more.  Leonard asked about the idea of NASA HSF safety excesses & we asked Michael if lessons learned & HSF safety issues were shared with both the private sector companies & the Russians.  I asked Michael about educational outreach & he had some interesting things to say about the international internet audience as well as the local audience.  The subject of urban legends came up in the outreach discussion & we honed in on the idea of the possibility of a rescue mission.  You do not want to miss this important discussion.  Other issues discussed included the foam problem, Leonard asked about the “bone matrix” he saw in use at the CAIB hearings, & I mentioned the need to really know & understand the hardware given our recent intimate visit with Endeavour.  Cultural issues were a part of this discussion, including the risk of workforce lulls & the need to avoid complacency.  Michael cited tile issues as an example going back to STS 1 and studying all missions to really understand tile concerns.  One email dealt with NASA risk aversion & some space enthusiasts saying that to open the space frontier we need to “kill more people.”  Michael addressed these issues, going over the NASA mission & imperatives, their responsibilities, and the risks of all sorts of consequences coming to life.  We talked about individual worker responsibility and accountability with Michael giving us both NASA and personal insights into this subject.  We then talked about the balancing act required in weighing the risk trades of cutting costs, cutting corners, taking more risks, taking less risks, etc.  He suggested private companies will go through a similar process and talked about the consequences of decisions which can be devastating with the loss of a crew to the termination of a program or the loss of the company.  Michael explained the Criticality One status and what it means in the risk analysis process.  Another listener asked if shuttles still had life left in them at the time of retirement. The short answer was yes but don’t miss what Michael has to say about the condition of space shuttle fleet at the time of retirement.  Another issue discussed dealt with trying to find a lower cost way of operating shuttle and dealing with all their infrastructure without compromising safety.  Near the end of the program, we took a Southern California call asking about potentially different standards for government astronauts and private-sector astronauts.  I was asked to lead off with my opinion which I did from a business liability perspective, then Michael and Leonard discussed the subject. We had lots to say about informed consent, litigation, & the uncertainties inherent when involved in a jury trial.  As we were winding down the program, Michael provided us with his closing comments, then I added in my own comments that focused on the sports inspirational speaker, Ray Lewis, linebacker with the Baltimore Ravens, who gives a terrific inspirational speech to teams around the country, “Pissed Off For Greatness.”  You can find lots of information about this by using Google for his name or the speech title.  Essentially, this is about not accepting mediocrity in what you do & I extrapolated it to space.  HSF workers, regardless of being with NASA or any company as well as others involved in the space field cannot accept mediocrity.  Being pissed off for greatness implies that if you are not pissed off for greatness, then you willing to settle for being mediocre in what you do.  Michael, Leonard and I talked about this at the end of the program.  I hope you will concur with me that extrapolating this inspirational sports talk to space fits.  Michael closed us out by saying it takes courage to stand up and say something if you believe something is off or not right in the program.  He further said it takes a lot to challenge the bureaucracy and stand up but that we all have to do it when the situation arises.

Please post your comments and questions on The Space Show blog URL above.  If you want to email Michael or Leonard, do so through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com and I will forward it to the person of your choice.