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Ed Wright, Friday, 7-12-13 July 13, 2013

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Ed Wright, Friday, 7-12-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2047-BWB-2013-07-12.mp3

 

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Guest:  Edward (Ed) Wright.  Topics: Citizens In Space, Space Hacker Workshop.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.

We welcomed Ed Wright back to the program to discuss the Space Hacker Workshop to be held at the Frontiers of Flight Museum at Love Field, Dallas, Texas July 20-21, 2013.  For more information about the event and for online registration at a discount (by a certain date), please visit www.citizensinspace.org.  The specific online registration link is http://spacehackerdfw.eventbrite.com.  Ed was with us for the entire program which was 1 hour 3 minutes in length.  Ed started the discussion with an overview of both Citizens in Space and the Space Hacker Workshop program of which the first was held a few months back in Silicon Valley. Ed then shifted gears to discuss the upcoming Space Hacker Workshop to be held at Love Field in Dallas.  He spoke about some of the main speakers including the top people from XCOR.  He also said it was a hands on workshop with the participants actually engaging in building things.  We went over registration and ticket pricing, plus Ed suggested a hotel for out of town participants.  Ed received several listener questions about the workshop and Citizens In Space.  For example, a listener asked if Ed’s organization had actually paid for the ten XCOR flights he talks about or if he only has a deposit for the fights.  Another wanted to know if he had a priority choice with XCOR as to which flights Citizens In Space will get.  He was also asked when he thought XCOR would become operational with commercial flights.  In a clarification comment, Ed also told us that all the Citizens In Space flights would be citizen science flights.  Citizens in Space was not engaging in space tourism per se.  We then talked about flight opportunities, what types of projects were wanted and how to get them accepted by Citizens In Space.  He said the rules  require all experiments & results to be open source.  Another listener asked if was competing against the groups that are part of the Next Generation Suborbital Researchers Conference.  Ed explained why there was a difference in both the customer and the target market for both.  He was also asked about scaling up to orbital spaceflight.  A few listeners wanted to know the plans for the next Space Hacker Workshop after Dallas.  Ed thought it might be at KSC in Florida but he did not make it definite at this time.  He also took a question about the fact that Lynx only flies to 2/3 of the way to space and if this impacted his citizen science projects and research.  Near the end of our discussion, Ed was asked about the regulatory environment that might adversely impact citizen science experiments, flights, & the work of Citizens In Space.  For Ed’s response to these and all the questions, don’t miss this important hour long discussion.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog per above. Ed can be contacted using edward.v.wright@rocketacademy.org.

 

Rand Simberg, Tuesday, 6-25-13 June 26, 2013

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Rand Simberg, Tuesday, 6-25-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2036-BWB-2013-06-25.mp3

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Guest:  Rand Simberg.   Topics:  Rand’s new book release, “Safe Is Not An Option,” human spaceflight potential regulation.  Please direct all comments/questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments & questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright & are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those of you interested in the opportunity to submit feedback on the NRC congressionally mandated Human Spaceflight Study, please go to www.nationalacademies.org/humanspaceflight.   Please remember that your Amazon Purchases Can Help Support The Space Show/OGLF (http://www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm).

We welcomed Rand Simberg back to the program for this 1 hour 47 minute discussion regarding his about to be released book, “Safe is Not An Option.”(http://safeisnotanoption.com).  Check out the book summary: http://safeisnotanoption.com/book-summary.  During our first hour, Rand explained the production challenges he has had with the book, the name change from last fall, & delays. He compared similarities with a book printing production run to the launch/flight rate.  With both he said one needs to get the rate way up there for economies of scale.  For the balance of our discussion, we talked about human spaceflight risk taking, the regulatory environment of today, &  potential risks to this regulatory environment down the road after 2015.  Rand supports individual choice & believes that regulation regarding flight safety would be detrimental to this developing industry. The subtitle of the book makes Rand’s case:  “Overcoming The Futile Obsession With Getting Everyone Back Alive That Is Killing Our Expansion Into Space.” Jim emailed to ask Rand to compare the risk taken by Virgin & XCOR flight participants with risky terrestrial ventures.  Rand suggested this would depend on the informed consent documents required under current FAA regulations.  Trent asked about one way trips to Mars & Mars One.  This brought up the discussion of space ethics & the Mars One position of pregnancy & childbirth as an ethical issue, not a personal choice issue as is the decision to do a one way trip to Mars.  Rand stressed that his book has to do with people taking their own risk, not the government, regulators, or policy makers dictating risk taking.

In the second segment, we fielded several questions from Curt on risk taking & Congress, plus he asked Rand about the nomad gene.  Another listener emailed in a question focused on the role of the media in helping to make space important beyond the space community.  Another listener wanted to know if Rand could see a day where to avoid government regulation, private human spaceflight would take place outside the United States.  I asked Rand about feedback he has received regarding his book & thesis, his interest in a Washington, DC media event upon the book’s release, selling the book at the upcoming NewSpace 2013 Conference, & if in his research, he came across papers, books, or other works advocating similar positions to his. During the entire discussion, Rand repeated his understanding that space is not important to the policy makers.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog above. Rand can be reached through his own blog on the About page at Transterrestrial Musings at www.transterrestrial.com.

Open Lines, Tuesday, 5-21-13 May 22, 2013

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Open Lines, Tuesday, 5-21-13

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2013-BWB-2013-05-21.mp3

Guest: Open Lines with Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  Our discussion covered wide range of timely topics per the below summary.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information.

We started our 2 hour 3 minute Open Lines discussion with a five minute recorded interview with Sarah Cruddas in the UK regarding the UK astronaut Tim Peake who is now scheduled for a mission to the ISS.  Sarah told us about the impact of Tim being the UK’s first government funded and supported astronaut.  You will clearly hear her excitement about this and for sure you will understand the very positive impact of this in England along with national British excitement.  Way to go England and congratulations from The Space Show!  You can find out more about Sarah’s reporting, space, science & film work at www.sarahcruddas.com. Our next caller was Mark Longanbach from Star Systems to tell us about the Hermes spacecraft and their efforts in developing a suborbital spaceship for tourism and cargo.  We also talked about crowd funding and Kickstarter with him.  Next, Nelson called in to talk about the need for long term NASA goals and he outlined his concept for bringing the space community together and making the most out of tight budgets, assets, technology, and capabilities, all in support of repositioning our space program for doing great things in the future. Nelson requested feedback on his idea so post your comments on The Space Show blog.  Nelson’s blog can be found at www.aviationweek.com/UserProfile.aspx?newspaperUserId=219284.  Kelly called next to talk about the upcoming 20th anniversary of DC-X and he compared back then to now.  As you will hear, Kelly saw more positive things back “in the day” than today.  He talked about today’s commercial space industry, NASA, SpaceX, commercial space, etc.  We also talked about the planned commercial Mars missions, the asteroid & lunar missions.  I’m sure you will find his comments interesting & thought provoking.

In our second segment, Tim said Rossi and his E-CAT were validated by a third party.  He then took issue with much of what Kelly had to say, especially around SpaceX and the emerging commercial space industry.  We also talked about the proposed NASA-Bigelow Aerospace project and I read the NASA PR announcement about it on air.  Later in the second segment, Charles Pooley called.  He wanted to talk about the NASA-Bigelow announcement and he said he also disagreed with Kelly, especially regarding SpaceX.  While Kelly was critical of the SpaceX engine design, Charles said it was an excellent design and he told us why he thought so.  I chimed in my support for SpaceX as I think they are doing a very good job and have solved inflight problems in an impressive way.  Also in this segment, we talked some about what constitutes a commercial mission.  I suggested today’s emerging industry is a hybrid but in the end, the companies behave as commercial companies. Pooley also talked about a Scaled CATO engine failure. He later sent us emails which I read on air that described the problem, then Charles called back to explain what I read.  Another topic I mentioned included the problems with the Kepler Space Telescope.

Post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  If you want to email any of the callers, do so through me.

 

Michael Ciannilli, Leonard David, Tuesday, 7-17-12 July 17, 2012

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Michael Ciannilli, Leonard David, Tuesday, 7-17-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1816-BWB-2012-07-17.mp3

Lessons Learned from the Columbia accident & NASA’s human spaceflight experience

Guests:  Michael Ciannilli, Leonard David.  Topics:  Columbia lessons learned & human spaceflight safety issues.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright.  We welcomed Michael Ciannilli of NASA to the program to discuss lessons learned from the Columbia accident & NASA’s history of human spaceflight. Leonard David of Space.com returned as a co-host for this program.  Our nearly two hour no break discussion started with Michael providing us with an historical overview of the Columbia accident.  We talked about the debris retrieval process & the fact that about 38% of Columbia was retrieved.  Michael was asked about surprises & among the many he mentioned, one in particular dealt with the tile & thermal impact showing burning on the inside & how that was a clue to what happened to Columbia.  Michael then listed several lessons learned.  When I asked if he could prioritize the items he mentioned, he said they were all important.  We talked about the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB), return to flight, incorporating lessons learned, & more.  Leonard asked about the idea of NASA HSF safety excesses & we asked Michael if lessons learned & HSF safety issues were shared with both the private sector companies & the Russians.  I asked Michael about educational outreach & he had some interesting things to say about the international internet audience as well as the local audience.  The subject of urban legends came up in the outreach discussion & we honed in on the idea of the possibility of a rescue mission.  You do not want to miss this important discussion.  Other issues discussed included the foam problem, Leonard asked about the “bone matrix” he saw in use at the CAIB hearings, & I mentioned the need to really know & understand the hardware given our recent intimate visit with Endeavour.  Cultural issues were a part of this discussion, including the risk of workforce lulls & the need to avoid complacency.  Michael cited tile issues as an example going back to STS 1 and studying all missions to really understand tile concerns.  One email dealt with NASA risk aversion & some space enthusiasts saying that to open the space frontier we need to “kill more people.”  Michael addressed these issues, going over the NASA mission & imperatives, their responsibilities, and the risks of all sorts of consequences coming to life.  We talked about individual worker responsibility and accountability with Michael giving us both NASA and personal insights into this subject.  We then talked about the balancing act required in weighing the risk trades of cutting costs, cutting corners, taking more risks, taking less risks, etc.  He suggested private companies will go through a similar process and talked about the consequences of decisions which can be devastating with the loss of a crew to the termination of a program or the loss of the company.  Michael explained the Criticality One status and what it means in the risk analysis process.  Another listener asked if shuttles still had life left in them at the time of retirement. The short answer was yes but don’t miss what Michael has to say about the condition of space shuttle fleet at the time of retirement.  Another issue discussed dealt with trying to find a lower cost way of operating shuttle and dealing with all their infrastructure without compromising safety.  Near the end of the program, we took a Southern California call asking about potentially different standards for government astronauts and private-sector astronauts.  I was asked to lead off with my opinion which I did from a business liability perspective, then Michael and Leonard discussed the subject. We had lots to say about informed consent, litigation, & the uncertainties inherent when involved in a jury trial.  As we were winding down the program, Michael provided us with his closing comments, then I added in my own comments that focused on the sports inspirational speaker, Ray Lewis, linebacker with the Baltimore Ravens, who gives a terrific inspirational speech to teams around the country, “Pissed Off For Greatness.”  You can find lots of information about this by using Google for his name or the speech title.  Essentially, this is about not accepting mediocrity in what you do & I extrapolated it to space.  HSF workers, regardless of being with NASA or any company as well as others involved in the space field cannot accept mediocrity.  Being pissed off for greatness implies that if you are not pissed off for greatness, then you willing to settle for being mediocre in what you do.  Michael, Leonard and I talked about this at the end of the program.  I hope you will concur with me that extrapolating this inspirational sports talk to space fits.  Michael closed us out by saying it takes courage to stand up and say something if you believe something is off or not right in the program.  He further said it takes a lot to challenge the bureaucracy and stand up but that we all have to do it when the situation arises.

Please post your comments and questions on The Space Show blog URL above.  If you want to email Michael or Leonard, do so through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com and I will forward it to the person of your choice.

The John Batchelor Show “Hotel Mars,” Wednesday, 3-14-12 March 15, 2012

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The John Batchelor Show “Hotel Mars,” Wednesday, 3-14-12

John Batchelor, Andrew Nelson, Dr. David Livingston

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1735-BWB-2012-03-14.mp3

Guests:  John Batchelor, Andrew Nelson, Dr. David Livingston.  Topics:  XCOR Aerospace and suborbital spaceflight/research.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. This program is archived on The Space Show website, podcasting, and blog sites with permission from John Batchelor. Please visit the John Batchelor Show website for more information about this fine program, www.johnbatchelorshow.com. The topics in this 11 minute plus segment focused on XCOR Aerospace, their Lynx vehicle, space tourism, and suborbital research missions.  Mr. Nelson, the COO of XCOR, spoke about their wanting to fly up to four times a day, vehicles that go to 200,000 feet as well as to 350,00 feet, the views that can be seen from the edge of space and much more.  We talked about the great success XCOR has had in gaining international interest and partners with their Lynx and their business model.  In response to questions, Andrew talked about microgravity and oncology research.  At one point he suggested that research revenues might come in around 60-70% of their total gross revenues.  Andrew also talked about ticket sales and prices and said that the $95K price includes the training, testing, and the flight.  If you have comments or questions, post them on The Space Show blog URL above.

If you want to email either Andrew Nelson or John Batchelor, please send your note to me and I will forward it to the person of your choice.