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Dr. Julie Robinson, Monday, 12-21-15 December 22, 2015

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Dr. Julie Robinson, Monday, 12-21-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2609-BWB-2015-12-21.mp3

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Guest: Dr. Julie Robinson.  Topics:  The ISS and how it benefits humanity.  Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com.  Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm.  For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed back to the program Dr. Julie Robinson, Chief Scientist for the ISS.  During the first segment of our 1 hour 25 minute program, I started the interview by asking our guest how research on the ISS benefits humanity.  Dr. Robinson told us about a special NASA website on this subject, www.nasa.gov/stationbenefits.com. You can freely download the NASA report on these benefits and contributions, “The International Space Station Benefits For Humanity, 2nd edition,” at https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/jsc_benefits_for_humanity_tagged_6-30-15.pdf.  This website has terrific station information on it so I urge you to become familiar with it.  Our guest said that since 2011, there have been significant R&D benefits.  Dr. Robinson listed a few examples including the development and refining of ultra sound, drug work, mitigation strategies for Duchesne Muscular Dystrophy, protein crystal growth, the new discoveries regarding latent virus shredding, plus having tested the new drug, Prolia, for bone strengthening.  Listener Jackie wanted to know more about expansion plans.  Our guest mentioned the BEAM inflatable module experiment for the ISS in 2016 as one way to expand the ISS.  Our guest was asked about the priority of experiments given ISS participants are international and governed by a multi-nation ISS agreement.  Don’t miss how projects are selected and financed.  Helen sent in a note wanting to know how the ISS contributed to cleaning up global water supplies.  Dr. Robinson replied by talking about the powerful ISS observational role and close coordination with UN agencies that do help to clean up water supplies. Environmental monitoring mentioned as well.   Julie was asked about the possibility of ISS post 2024, the planned shut down date for the station.  She said the station was designed to last 30 years with good safety margins built into the design.  The actual shut down of the station will be made on a political and budgetary basis along with the station partners.  I asked her about the possibility of privatizing the station as many Space Show guests and listeners have advocated or even said would happen down the road. Our guest said the station was not designed to operate cheaply. When it was designed and built, it was pushing the edge of technology, design, engineering, and life support.  She suggested a private company would do much better developing a new station built upon what we have learned from many disciplines since the station was designed and built.  Dr. Robinson had more to say on this subject so don’t miss it.  Todd asked her about the use of robots on the station taking over most of the duties now performed by astronauts.  In short, she said that technology was not there yet, it was being worked on but it may be ten years or so out from now.  Before the break, a listener asked her about an earlier comments about the station not supporting humans to Mars.  Dr. Robinson corrected this listener.  As a National Lab, it is chartered to devote half its resources and budget to supporting humanitarian issues, projects and causes, and half to space exploration which would include Mars missions.

In the second segment, we discussed in more detail Earth Sciences, technology, education, and cognition experiments. For all these categories, our guest provided examples showing how these missions benefit humanity and the role the ISS played in them.  Listener Paul asked if the station had downward looking radar on it, then BJohn asked another question wondering how our guest would design the next station for a $100 billion dollar budget.  Julie said the station would not cost $100 billion, then she said the next station would likely be private, citing some additional examples to support her statement. Don’t miss what she had to say on this subject.  Animal experiments were mentioned, especially using mice.  She was asked about using other animals but she explained why mice and other rodents were the research animal of choice on land as well as in space.  In elaborating about technologies, she also cited many examples including one present in all our laptops as well as one involved in alloy manufacturing.  Regarding educational outreach, the ISS has many programs on a global basis but one she talked about was the one using ham radio operators to provide a link to talk to the station at various schools.  Space tourism on the station was discussed, so was commercial business including NanoRacks, and Chinese space station possibilities.  Near the end of the program, Dr. Robinson answered questions about the ISS budget and how to lower it.  Our guest offered us excellent closing comments.

Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog.  You can reach Dr. Robinson through The Space Show as well as her NASA website.

 

Dr. Pamela “Rai” Menges, Friday, 3-27-15 March 28, 2015

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Dr. Pamela “Rai” Menges, Friday, 3-27-15

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/2442-BWB-2015-03-27.mp3

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Guest: Dr. Pamela “Rai” Menges. Topics: Space innovation, privately funded research, The Space Power Lab, nuclear power & weapons, commercial space & more. Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. In addition, please remember that your Amazon purchases can help support The Space Show/OGLF. See www.onegiantleapfoundation.org/amazon.htm. For those listening to archives using live365.com and rating the programs, please email me as to why you assign a specific rating to the show. This will help me bring better programming to the audience.

We welcomed Dr. Pamela “Rai” Menges to the show. I suggest you visit her websites and follow along as applicable with our discussion. Visit http://arsispace.com/spacetechnology.htm and http://starsailorenergy.com. During the first segment of our 1 hour 47 minute show, Dr. Menges introduced us to Aerospace Research Systems, Inc. (ARSI) and talked about the company history dating back to its founding in 1993. We talked about research technologies, private R&D, government funding for research, and specific projects referenced by our guest including the Space Power Laboratory. At one point Dr. Menges discussed the pros and cons of taking government research money and why she elected not to do so. Also, the use of public relations (PR) and the role it plays with those accepting government money. After a brief mention and discussion of the possible space policy positions presented by Ohio Senator Rob Portman, we turned our attention toward power storage and the work our guest has been doing in this area for non-electrolytic power storage. Don’t miss this discussion. Another topic was the use of AC and DC power transmission, the Carrington Event in the 1800’s, and our electrical grid. Jack emailed about the spaceplane shown on the ARSI website, the Ramstar Model. Our guest had much to say about this experimental spaceplane concept and design. I

n the second segment, Ben in Boston asked about telemedicine commercial astronaut healthcare per the descriptive on the ARSI website. Pamela went into detail about this topic, their work with JSC and more. We then spoke to the issue of commercial astronaut safety in general with our guest expressing her thoughts of the safety issues within the industry and the regulatory environment. Later in the segment, the concept of ground effect vehicles came up along with advanced hypersonic technology and even SSTO possibilities. I asked our guest about nuclear propulsion and then several listeners asked her about it as well. Carol’s email took us on a different path as she asked about the need for lots of centrifuges for a peaceful nuclear energy program. This opened the door for our guest to speak about nuclear weapons, the current talks with Iran, and the treaty organizations that safeguard against proliferation. Pamela had much to say about this subject, our government, the Iranians, enrichment, centrifuges, trust but verify and more. Do not miss this discussion. Ft. Worth John called to ask about the use of centrifuges as opposed to other technologies such as gaseous diffusion. Near the end of the program, Luis emailed us about Reaction Engines and the Skylon project space plane. He too sent in a question about winged ground effect vehicles. Kristopher emailed us to check out “Caspian sea monster” on YouTube for an example of these vehicles. Dr. Menges talked about her new book that will be out in the near future and for Pearls of Wisdom suggested “doing what you want to do to pursue your dreams.”

Please post comments/questions on The Space Show blog above. You can email Dr. Menges through her websites or me.

Dennis Wingo, Monday, 8-6-12 August 7, 2012

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Dennis Wingo, Monday, 8-6-12

http://archived.thespaceshow.com/shows/1830-BWB-2012-08-06.mp3

Guest:  Dennis Wingo.  Topics:  Economic Development of the Moon.  You are invited to comment, ask questions, and discuss the Space Show program/guest(s) on the Space Show blog, https://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments, questions, and any discussion must be relevant and applicable to Space Show programming. Transcripts of Space Show programs are not permitted without prior written consent from The Space Show (even if for personal use) & are a violation of the Space Show copyright. We welcomed Dennis Wingo back to the program to discuss his July 16, 2012 blog article and concept, “Changing the Conversation about the Economic Development of the Moon.”  You can find his article at http://denniswingo.wordpress.com.  We started our first segment of this nearly two hour program with a shout out to NASA, JPL, & the entire Curiosity team for an outstanding job with landing Curiosity on Mars.  Dennis then pointed out that MSL and Curiosity cost about half of a Nimitz Super Carrier.  Dennis then talked about heavy lift and the fact that modern technology, on orbit fuel depots, orbital dynamics, and ISRU usage all provide reasonable and cost-effective alternatives to the need for heavy lift.  In this discussion, he also included the use of a lunar 3D printer.  Dennis listed several new technologies and applications so don’t miss this section.  Dennis next outlined a plan to eventually have boots on the lunar surface at both poles for water and development.  He would start of with robotics. He noted a preference for the north pole.  We talked about our present day capability to get to either lunar pole.  Doug called in from S. California to talk about telerobotics using telemedicine as an example.  During this discussion, we learned that in the use of robotics, about 90%  represents the robots while 10% represents the people operating, servicing, repairing, and maintaining the robots.
In our second segment, listener Larry asked Dennis about timelines.  Dennis suggested by 2020 we could be back on the Moon.  He broke this down in stages to explain why it would take so long to undertake this mission.  He then said we needed a mindset change to go back to the Moon.  The mindset change enables seeing the Moon first for economic development and then science as a secondary objective.  We talked about the international potential for such a lunar economic mission (private, not government), Another listener asked our guest if a Netscape Moment was essential for developing lunar commerce.  Michael called in to talk about the potential legal & regulatory risks for lunar economic missions.  This too was an interesting & challenging discussion, don’t miss it.  Tim called to ask about the use of space tugs and specific launch vehicles as well as new combinations of rocket fuel. Dennis offered us important closing comments about financing such missions, launch cost issues of concern, and allowing government to dictate our future.  Please post your comments/questions on the blog.
If you want to send an email to Dennis Wingo, you can do so through me & I will forward it to him.